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Recabling Denon AH-D1001 (&D1000)

post #1 of 84
Thread Starter 
When I performed the Markl type mods on my Denon AH-D1001/D1000 (documented in this thread http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f4/mar...-d1000-350167/ ), I saw how easy it would be to recable these cans, and less than a week later, I was inside them again. This thread provides some info on the recabling job I did. I assume you already have a soldering iron and some quality electronics solder, and that you know how to solder and use heat shrink tubing.

To do the recable, I used:

Mogami Mini Quad 2893 wire, 4 feet
Switchcraft 3.5mm gold plated stereo plug 35HDBAU
Various sizes of heat shrink tubing

I ordered the wire and plug from Markertek, although they are available at many other places.

I chose not to encase my cable in braided sleeving, but if you decide to use sleeving, the recommended item for use with Mogami 2893 would be Techflex 1/8-inch Multifilament Nylon. The Multifilament Nylon sleeving is softer to the touch than conventional Techflex. The 1/8-inch size Techflex is large enough to fit over Mogami 2893 cable, but small enough to be squeezed through the rubber grommets at the cable entry points to the Denon ear cups. I chose not to add the sleeving because my phones will stay indoors in one place, so they don’t need the added protection. In addition, the cable without sleeving is less microphonic and more flexible. I don’t mind seeing the colored internal wires exposed (it’s really easy to tell left from right), but if you do, go ahead and sleeve it.

The picture below shows a comparison of wires from the original Denon cable (left) and those from the Mogami 2893 (right). The Mogami wires are specified as 26 AWG. The original Denon wires look like 30 AWG, although I don't have a way to measure them precisely. Besides being thicker, the copper strands of the Mogami wire could also be a higher grade of OFC, because the sonic differences between the cables seem greater than what could be accounted for just by the thickness. The Denon copper strands are also wound around nylon fibers (which I separated for the photo). Presumably these fibers are to strengthen the overall cable. In the Mogami cable, strength is added with cotton fibers between the wires (not between the copper strands).



The four wires inside the Mogami cable are red, black, blue, and clear, plus a bare copper shield. I arbitrarily decided that I would assign them:

Red = Right Positive (+)
Black = Right Negative (-)
Blue = Left Positive (+)
Clear = Left Negative (-)\

I didn’t take a photo of the Switchcraft connector insides, but like all 3.5mm stereo plugs with standard Tip, Ring, Sleeve configuration (Wiki TRS connector ):

Tip = Left Positive
Ring = Right Positive
Sleeve = Left & Right Negative

Therefore, the wires were soldered thus:

Tip = Blue wire
Ring = Red wire
Sleeve = Black & Clear wires, plus Copper Shield

The copper shield gets soldered to the plug sleeve, along with the black and clear wires, but the other end of the copper shield is left unattached. That way, the shield acts as a drain for any RF noise that might be picked up.

If you happen to rewire the ear cups before doing the plug, make sure you slide the outer housing of the Switchcraft connector and a couple of pieces of heat shrink tubing (and optional Techflex) onto the cable before you solder the wires to the connector.

For the Y-split in the cable to go to the separate left and right ear cups, I used an X-Acto knife to peel off the outer insulation from about one-and-a-half feet of the Mogami cable. Do this very carefully to avoid nicking any of the insulation around the internal wires. (Start a slit in the insulation with the X-Acto blade facing outward, away from the internal wires. You can then peel away the insulation by hand.) Snip off the cotton reinforcing fibers and the excess copper shield (this end of the shield does not get attached to anything). I then twisted the wires in each pair around each other and used heat shrink to protect the Y-split, as shown in the photo below.



To open the ear cups for rewiring, see the instructions in the Mod thread (http://www.head-fi.org/forums/f4/mar...-d1000-350167/). Pull a few inches of the wire inward through the rubber grommet so you can lay down the driver apart from the cup.

Unsolder the stock wires from the rear of the driver. Unknot the stock cable, and pull it out through the rubber grommet.

On the rear of the driver, the positive (+) connection side is marked with a red dot, but if you have done the Markl mod, the dot may be covered by Dynamat and no longer visible. In my unit, on both the left and right drivers, the marking is the same as shown in this picture, but check yours as the polarity could be swapped on one or both of the drivers.



The following pictures are of my phones that already had the Markl mods and fiber stuffing, so yours won’t look the same inside if you haven’t already done the mods. (Of course, right now while you have the phones open would be a good time to do those mods.)

Checking to make sure you’ve got the correct pair of wires for your left or right ear cup, thread the new twisted wires from outside the ear cup through the rubber grommet, then pull five or six inches inside. (If you're using Techflex around your new wires, you may need to temporarily remove the grommet from its hole in the ear cup to fit the Techflex wires through the grommet.)

If you’re leaving the wires bare, slide a 3/4-inch long piece of heat shrink onto the wire at least three inches from the end. Then, tie the cable into a knot. Slide another piece of heat shrink onto the wires down to the knot. Shrink up the heat shrinks. (If you’re covering your cable with Techflex, you can omit the first piece of heat shrink. Knot the wire with the Techflex on it, then use a piece of heat shrink where the wires emerge from the end of the Techflex.) Solder the wires to their appropriate pads on the driver. What you have at this point should look like this:



From the outside of the ear cup, gently pull the wires back out until the first piece of heat shrink protrudes from the grommet. Seat the knot into the slot inside the ear cup. Push the wire with the second piece of heat shrink into the curved portion of the slot. (The tip of a letter opener is useful to stuff the wire into the curve.) It will look like this.



Then, simply reassemble the cups and reattach the ear pads, as described in the mod thread.

Final result:



You're done. Plug in and enjoy. (Get ready to be shocked at how much better they sound.)
post #2 of 84
Wow very nice writeup with pix Bostonears!!
post #3 of 84
If anyone wants to re-cable their 1000/1001 I have a stock D2000 cable up for sale. Just got my D5000 cable today :-D
post #4 of 84
Thread Starter 
I've added a picture comparing the wires of the original Denon cable with those of the Mogami 2893. See revised original post in this thread.
post #5 of 84
Great walk-through!! Thanks so much for this one as well as the Markl-Mod thread. You're awesome
post #6 of 84
Can anyone suggest some folks that could do a d1001 recable (maybe the other mod too)? I haven't decided on the Markl-mod yet, but I'm very interested in the recable.
post #7 of 84
would canare star quad be better or worse than mogami (in any category...sq durability, reliability etc)?
post #8 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ub3rMario View Post
would canare star quad be better or worse than mogami (in any category...sq durability, reliability etc)?
Which specific part number Canare are you considering?

Canare makes excellent cable. (I use some as speaker wire.) However, the outer diameter of Canare quad tends to be pretty big, which isn't usually desirable for headphones, due to weight and microphonics. For example, the Canare 4 conductor microphone cable with 25 AWG (Canare Multichannel Star Quad Microphone Cable specs) has an outer diameter of 0.429 inches. That's HUGE. It wouldn't even fit into a 3.5mm plug. The Canare 4S6 speaker cable (Canare Star Quad Speaker Cable specs) is 0.242 inches diamater with 20 AWG, but the stranding isn't as fine as the microphone cable, and it's unshielded. And that's still pretty big to fit into a 3.5mm plug. (It would probably be OK for use with a 1/4 inch plug.)
post #9 of 84
I'm now using Canare L-4E6S on my HD25-1 and it sounds real fun!
It's shielded and its (I think) 21 AWG. But the downside is, there are some microphonic.. But for the rest, great cable!
post #10 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ub3rMario View Post
would canare star quad be better or worse than mogami (in any category...sq durability, reliability etc)?
Check this for one person's take on the difference between Mogami 2893 and Canare L-4E5C.

I believe the Canare mini starquad is very similar in outer diameter (0.189 according to Markertek.com) to the 2893.

My parts are en route I went with Mogami.
post #11 of 84
Done My first recable, and really, my first true soldering experience.

I had to solder and resolder a few times to get it right, broke the ring lead off of one neutrik plug (nobody told me I wasn't supposed to bend it 90 degrees ), accidentally poked a little crater into my headband with a hot iron (doh).

I was a pretty worried about cold joints / shorts / damaged drivers but it i plugged it in and it worked great. Thanks so much for the help Bostonears, couldn't have done it without you.

Question though, if my joints are semi-crappy, would the SQ be affected or is it more of a "if it works, it works" type of deal? I'm trying to convince myself not to resolder the whole thing again
post #12 of 84
When you say your joints are crappy do you mean in appearance? As long as you don't have a ton of solder and you have a good secure joint, appearence won't really matter. Might be best to leave well enough alone if the are presently working good. They can always be repaired later if need be. In the mean time you can practice your soldering skills. Just get you some wire and any kind of spare parts you can scrounge up with different types of terminals (lugs, pins, ect...) and start practicing. That is the way we did it when I was in college. Then you can progress up to surface mount devices. Hell in no time you will be building amps and cables like a pro. Doesn't take a genius, just some skills that can be developed with a lot of practice.
post #13 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by googan View Post
Done My first recable, and really, my first true soldering experience.

I had to solder and resolder a few times to get it right, broke the ring lead off of one neutrik plug (nobody told me I wasn't supposed to bend it 90 degrees ), accidentally poked a little crater into my headband with a hot iron (doh).

I was a pretty worried about cold joints / shorts / damaged drivers but it i plugged it in and it worked great. Thanks so much for the help Bostonears, couldn't have done it without you.

Question though, if my joints are semi-crappy, would the SQ be affected or is it more of a "if it works, it works" type of deal? I'm trying to convince myself not to resolder the whole thing again
Googan,

Congrats on your first recable.

Bad solder joints would typically exhibit themselves as intermittent sound, that is, you move your headphones or cable around and one of the channels momentarily cuts out. Unless you used the wrong kind of solder (i.e. one not designed for electrical applications), a bad solder joint would not just make the headphones sound bad. The knot in the cable and the curved groove inside the ear cup help to minimize movement of the solder joint, so if it's working OK now, it should be fine. Of course, if a problem does develop, you know what you need to do...

ronnielee54's suggestion to practice soldering scraps of wire and spare connectors before working on the headphones is good advice for anyone with limited soldering experience.
post #14 of 84
I guess I'm just being paranoid. The joints don't look too bad but I thought maybe I didn't apply enough solder, or maybe I remelted the solder one too many times (to adjust the wire position), that it might cause a problem. My biggest concern is actually the plug. I twisted the copper shield + black + clear wires all into one big twist, and some of the strands of copper look like it might eventually end up touching either the ring or tip leads.

They sound great though. No intermittent noise/cut-outs. Thanks for clearing that up for me.
post #15 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by googan View Post
My biggest concern is actually the plug. I twisted the copper shield + black + clear wires all into one big twist, and some of the strands of copper look like it might eventually end up touching either the ring or tip leads.
If the plug isn't all covered in heat shrink already, go back inside and just lay a small piece of electrical tape between the copper strands and the other leads.
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