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IEMs - how do you know what a safe volume is? - Page 2

post #16 of 25
For me it is a good volume that when I take out my IEMs -in the city- my first thought is 'what a noisy place is this'. ;-)
post #17 of 25
If you manage to scream for 8 yrs, 7 months, 6 days...u ll generate enough energy to boil a cup of water.


but with headphones it might be shorter...now how shorter that i dont know.

after 3 hrs of a movie i need to take off my headphones otherwise it gets sweaty.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nocturnal310 View Post
If you manage to scream for 8 yrs, 7 months, 6 days...u ll generate enough energy to boil a cup of water.


but with headphones it might be shorter...now how shorter that i dont know.

after 3 hrs of a movie i need to take off my headphones otherwise it gets sweaty.
that's a great deal of energy. abit worried for my ears. im literally cooking my ears everyday.
post #19 of 25
Each person is different. I have extremely sensitive ears and I listen at very low levels. Sometimes at a level that the source can't even achieve- ie. the lowest sound level on creative stone plus with er-4p is too loud for me.

Just put volume at LOWEST while still being able to hear.
post #20 of 25
Same here. My ears are very sensitive to loud noises, which is why these days I hate going to see the movies because I come out with very painful ears afterwards.

I always take breaks every half hour, and I don't push the volume much at all to remain comfortable, even in a noisy environment like an aeroplane or bus.

My sensitivity has gotten worse since I had a traffice accident and took quiet a knock to my head.....
post #21 of 25
I listen to low levels too.

Like with my P2 I listen to about 2-3/30 at night, and about 4-6 when in a loud enviroment, and both seem very good for hearing all the detail and bass in the music I listen to.

Of course thats with using EQ, but some of the EQ is - also.

A while ago I was watching a south park episode and had to jack the volume up to 10/30.
Then I switched to music without changing volume and my ears got hot real quick lol, good thing for hardware volume buttons on the P2.
post #22 of 25
If it's fatiguing after a short period of time, it's likely too loud.
post #23 of 25
I have tinnitus and I would find that my iem's aggravate it because unconsciously id raise the volume. There is just so much detail in an iem that I would want to hear every last detail and raise the volume to achieve that. Much to the agony of my ears. I have begun to listen at lower volume levels although I miss the encompassing detail when I turn it up. I'm hoping an amp will remedy this problem.
post #24 of 25
Yep, I find using an Amp gives me all the details without having to cope with the volume.
post #25 of 25
I have started to use efficient IEMs (Triple Fi's) only recently. My volume setting on my Cowon D2 is at 10-15 most of the time, compared to 30-40 on previous hps. I'm actually surprised that I can hear clearly at such low volumes because my job for 8 years has involved a lot of transcription from poor quality recordings (audio cassettes) and I just assumed they would damage my hearing. The danger signals that I was listening too long earlier was that my ears would just get tired...I felt like taking a break. But nowadays, because of lower volume settings, I listen for longer without fatigue - the danger signals are gone. I suppose it comes to the same thing - I am damaging my ears through longer exposure - only the damage will be more gradual.
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