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Klipsch Custom 2

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
How does this model do? Is it easy to wear (get a proper seal)?

And IEMs don't damage hearing because it's closer to the ear drum right? Can I get an external medical link that confirms that?

Thanks.
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goit View Post
And IEMs don't damage hearing because it's closer to the ear drum right? Can I get an external medical link that confirms that?
It is loud volume that causes hearing damage. IEM is as safe as any headphone when used properly. Read this and this(pdf).

Better yet, why don't you find a scientific research that provides solid confirmation which indicates IEMs cause hearing damage because it's closer to the ear drum? I doubt you'll find any.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClieOS View Post
It is loud volume that causes hearing damage. IEM is as safe as any headphone when used properly. Read this and this(pdf).

Better yet, why don't you find a scientific research that provides solid confirmation which indicates IEMs cause hearing damage because it's closer to the ear drum? I doubt you'll find any.
Are IEMs more expensive than regular cans? Like for the same price, will a the can sound better or the IEM sound better?
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
https://www.audiologyonline.com/theH..._10_p10-16.pdf
It does appear that in ear phones are more likely to cause hearing damage. Number 10 says it, 7 to 9 db higher on the same volume level! That's a lot.
post #5 of 15
probably IEM would sound better cause you would be cutting out the external noise that spoils your music.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by western120 View Post
probably IEM would sound better cause you would be cutting out the external noise that spoils your music.
Yes, but would an IEM be worse, because they are smaller and thus costs more for the same quality? Like notebook vs desktop? The large headphones have like 50mm drivers.
post #7 of 15
well depends on your budget and the kind of sound signature and portability you are looking for.
I use IEM since they cut out outside noise when I am roaming around in college. Right now I am working and still use IEM in my office.

So it depends on a lot of factors.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by western120 View Post
well depends on your budget and the kind of sound signature and portability you are looking for.
I use IEM since they cut out outside noise when I am roaming around in college. Right now I am working and still use IEM in my office.

So it depends on a lot of factors.
My budget is 150 dollars, I'm looking at the Klipsch custom2, equation audio RP21, Maudio Q40. The latter two are studio monitors and also have sound blocking cups.
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goit View Post
https://www.audiologyonline.com/theH..._10_p10-16.pdf
It does appear that in ear phones are more likely to cause hearing damage. Number 10 says it, 7 to 9 db higher on the same volume level! That's a lot.
As quoted:
Quote:
"We observed that the in-ear and earbud-style earphones produced 7 to 9 dB higher output than the over-the-ear earphones at the same volume control setting. Unfortunately, the popular media over-interpreted this observation and earbud-style headphones got a bad rap!"
You are, too, over-interpreted what that one paragraph said. If you read on:
Point 17:
Quote:
"I’m glad we got back to this, as this is an important point. In our study, we found that the level of background noise had a direct effect on a user’s chosen listening level. For instance, in a quiet sound booth (background noise level is low, about 28 dBA) about 6% of headphone users chose levels above 85 dBA. (We might consider 85 dBA as a cutoff for “riskier listening behavior.”)

When background noise was raised to 80 dBA of airplane cabin noise (as though subjects were listening to their headphones while flying on an airplane), 80% chose levels above 85 dBA. This was seen irrespective
of whether they used an earbud or an over-the-ear earphone, as long as the
earphone provided no sound isolation.

However, when subjects listened in that airplane noise condition using the ER6i (Etymotic Research, Inc.), an earphone with sound isolation, only 20% listened above 85 dBA. This earphone provided an average of 25 dB of sound isolation according to our measures for each of our 100 subjects."
Point 18:
Quote:
"Yes, using a sound-isolating earphone will generally cause a person to moderate their listening levels. This assumes that it isn’t necessary for the person to be able to hear in their surroundings (that is, it’s not necessary for safety or communication reasons to be able to hear well).

Consider it a matter of signal-to-noise ratio. If background noise is masking the sound you want to hear (like music), you’ll turn up that signal. In a noisy background (for example, on a plane), people will typically turn up the music so they can hear it over the noise. For those people who would usually choose a moderate level in quiet, but turn it up in high background noise, using sound-isolating earphones has a direct impact on listening behavior."
What the author means is: if you use an IEM, you are more likely (as 80% of people do) to turn down the volume, thus resulting in less volume and less likely for hearing damage to occur. In fact, many people choose to use IEM because we can turn our volume down yet enjoy great SQ in noisy environment.

Also note that, while an good closed headphone can block out about 80% (or less) of noise, an good IEM can easily block out >90% of noise.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goit View Post
My budget is 150 dollars, I'm looking at the Klipsch custom2, equation audio RP21, Maudio Q40. The latter two are studio monitors and also have sound blocking cups.
Shop around for the Atrio M5/M8. You might stretch your budget by 10-20 bucks but it's worth it. ER4P also a contender in your range, but depends on the type of sound you prefer.
post #11 of 15
Thread Starter 
I decided to raise the budget to 300 dollars. I'm now looking at the custom 3. Klipsch says that they are designed for classical music. They are supposd to be

Very rich in tone colors
lush
bright
warm
good sound separation
airy
tight controlled bass

etc...

Is that true?

And also, do IEM users get tinnitus more often? Do they get ear pain/infections all the time?

Thanks.
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm getting very few replies. Why does no one like the klipsch?
post #13 of 15
About the Klipsch Custom 3s, lots of people were complaining about fit issues and stating that the gel ear inserts they come with don't work well.
post #14 of 15
I admit, they are finicky, but the klipsch ear gels are the most comfortable I've had so far. I haven't tried the shure black foamies, so I can't comment on how easy it is to get a seal or how comfortable they are in comparison. I posted some fit tips on the Klipsch website, or if you get some custom-3s just shoot me a pm with any fit questions.
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fud View Post
I admit, they are finicky, but the klipsch ear gels are the most comfortable I've had so far. I haven't tried the shure black foamies, so I can't comment on how easy it is to get a seal or how comfortable they are in comparison. I posted some fit tips on the Klipsch website, or if you get some custom-3s just shoot me a pm with any fit questions.
People complain that the klipsch customs have poor highs, thus unfit with classical. Something about the highs not "shimmering", with the cymbals or something like that. Do you find your custom2 to have poor highs? Because klipsch loudspeakers are known for very sharp highs.
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