or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › What does wood do to sound exactly in a headphone
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What does wood do to sound exactly in a headphone - Page 2

post #16 of 31
Wood is good! All my favorite headphones use wood housing. Coincidence? I think not...
post #17 of 31
I don't personally think wood makes a major difference to the sound, my phones are mostly woodied because it's easy to work with when modding phones and it looks pretty.

Many top phones use wood as it's part belief that wood is better, partly because it looks nice and partly because top of the line products are presented as a mixture of fine engineering and art. You think Jaguar uses a burl walnut dash to make the car work better? No, it's a status thing. Top of the line deserves all the trimmings to convey the impression of exotic quality. Same with using real leather instead of vinyl or pleather.
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post
I don't personally think wood makes a major difference to the sound, my phones are mostly woodied because it's easy to work with when modding phones and it looks pretty.

Many top phones use wood as it's part belief that wood is better, partly because it looks nice and partly because top of the line products are presented as a mixture of fine engineering and art. You think Jaguar uses a burl walnut dash to make the car work better? No, it's a status thing. Top of the line deserves all the trimmings to convey the impression of exotic quality. Same with using real leather instead of vinyl or pleather.
I read somewhere that wood doesn't change the sound, and I have kind of just accepted that.

Your analogy with a car isn't relevant since the sound reflects off the wood and will have an effect. What that effect is... I don't know. On cars, it's just for looks and won't interact with anything that has to do with performance.

I do know that the PS-1 and HP-2 have a very refined smooth sound, and the wooden Grados have a warmer softer sound to them, but I'm sure the drivers has a lot to do with that.
post #19 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by nikongod View Post
There are very few woods that actually resonate. Basically EVERYTHING about wood avoids resonances. The inconsistencies in its density, cellular structure, and grain all serve to internally dampen a piece of wood. Dampened things dont resonate.

MDF is used because its actually flat. Cut boards are almost never flat, which makes building a tight enclosure virtually impossible. You can find small speakers and high frequency drivers mounted in solid wood cabinets.

The shell of the D5000 is mahogany. I would argue against calling mahogany almost non resonant, it is VERY non resonant. plastics depend on the plastic and how its formed. metals: most are resonant enough to make a functional bell out of.

the beauty with a "hybrid design" using BOTH metals and wood is that the wood dampens the ringing of the metal, and a little metal gives the wood exceptional strength. i'd say its QUITE cool.
That is not what he thinks about the different kind of woods...Probably resonance was not the right word to be used in that context but maybe vibrations, or any other....

BTW you can get wood flat as well, with an industrial process, and also you can use playwood, and it is avoided as well...MDF is far better in being a dead support for speakers...But for headhones will be really ugly.

Also there is cost factor, as plastic molds, and injection process, tend to be cheap in the way you increase the number of units, but if you are going to run a limited edition heapdhone or the like, maybe a 2000 pieces or less, like the R-10, some AT, etc....a program in a CNC machine, and wood will be a lot cheaper than the plastic whole process...it is the opposite of what many people think, I'm a CNC programmer, and I can tell you that a CNC could do wonders for real cheap...
post #20 of 31

I've Only One Question...

I've only one question for you "skeptics"...

... would Perlman play a plastic violin?

You must be kidding!
post #21 of 31
Well, the thing i am missing here is that wooden cups, because of the way it is made, have a much thicker wall then plastic cups. This alone has a very great influence. The bigger masse should make it harder to move (mass inertia law).

And as a Bassplayer with experience with both wooden and plastic woods. Wooden instruments tend to absorb the vibration while plastic instruments have much longer sustain because it does not absorb the tone. Before you start burning and pointing out what i said above. That plastic instruments have always much thicker walls with harder kinds of plastic then the standard soft plastic thin walls most headphones are build of.

Edit: I like the colouring of wood. While the better sustain and clearer definition of plastic basses (f.e. basslab) i am always missing the colouring of a wooden instrument. Wood just sounds nicer. Still waiting for a good mixture of both... sigh....
post #22 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradofan2 View Post
I've only one question for you "skeptics"...

... would Perlman play a plastic violin?

You must be kidding!
It will be really hard to find an Stradivarious made of plastic, specialy at that time...

From the Britanica encyclopedia:

"...Resonance is particularly important in music. For example, the sound box of a violin does its job well if it has a natural frequency of oscillation that responds resonantly to each musical note..."

The reason they use wood is becasue they want resonance in the instruments...

See here as well...

We do not want the headphones to resonate like an instrument, all the opposite...
post #23 of 31
We're talking about itty-bitty little pieces of wood used as a housing, mated with metal or plastic and often heavily damped, not something specifically designed as a resonance chamber like a violin is.

As to would whatsisface use a plastic violin, dunno but carbon fiber ones are making good inroads.
post #24 of 31
I wish I could offer more information, but I've actually been thinking about this because I've thought to myself:

"Self, what could be do to make our grados better? Buy new grados? Maybe a mod? Oh, look! There's some gentlemen who make wood cups with a reversible mod for updating the drivers. Self...do we take the plunge?"

And it's not like I can send them back if I don't like them (although, I don't think I can return them). So...this thread asks exactly the question that I've been pondering.

Here's to hoping to see more opinions.

Nylan
post #25 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sovkiller View Post
It will be really hard to find an Stradivarious made of plastic, specialy at that time...
Im sure they could have found a plastic violin at the time when pearlman was playing.

very few of the current violin makers are using plastics or composites for much more than experimentation or electronic instruments.

i saw a video of pearlman playing an electric violin, it was still jawdroippingly good, but the sound was the difference from a acoustic guitar to a flying-V.
Quote:
From the Britanica encyclopedia:

"...Resonance is particularly important in music. For example, the sound box of a violin does its job well if it has a natural frequency of oscillation that responds resonantly to each musical note..."

The reason they use wood is becasue they want resonance in the instruments...

See here as well...

We do not want the headphones to resonate like an instrument, all the opposite...
I think that you are drawing the wrong conclusion from that.

Its the chamber volume that causes the amplification of the sound of the vibrating strings. When you tap the plates of a well made violin it is clear that there is virtually no resonance in the body of the instrument. If the body of the instrument had resonances the sound of the tap would exhibit a ringing decay. The key is that when the outside "stimulus" stops, the sound does to and promptly. There is some leeway to the violin maker to design a LITTLE resonance into the instrument, but this is no different from the leeway given to speaker and headphone makers in voicing their products. The great violin masters all knew that the only proper way to build a violin was their way, but they did agree on a couple basic points from the sound of things.

When the enclosure resonates it can have an effect on the attack and decay of the music. Are you listening to the driver moving or the enclosure? At the end of the day, it makes a HUGE difference.
Quote:
Originally Posted by smeggy View Post
We're talking about itty-bitty little pieces of wood used as a housing, mated with metal or plastic and often heavily damped, not something specifically designed as a resonance chamber like a violin is.
but the parts of the headphone are not usually dampened with anything but the natural properties of the wood.

Grados use naked wood, denons use naked wood, JVC uses naked wood, Sony used naked wood, Audio-TEchnica uses (you guessed it) naked wood!
Quote:
As to would whatsisface use a plastic violin, dunno but carbon fiber ones are making good inroads.
CF does have cool properties, but i think that the ability to REALLLLY finely tune the thickness of a single piece of wood in a violin will give some advantages no mater how far along CF gets....
Quote:
Originally Posted by nylan8301 View Post
"Self, what could be do to make our grados better? Buy new grados? Maybe a mod? Oh, look! There's some gentlemen who make wood cups with a reversible mod for updating the drivers. Self...do we take the plunge?"
regarding having cups made up to modify lesser grados:
the depth of the cup has more effect on sound than the material. im sure this will be taken out of context, so i will add: if you had 2 otherwise identical cups made of wood and metal there would be differences based on material, but the fact is you probably dont have 2 otherwise identical cups. 1mm is significant when dealing with a port depth of less than 40mm...

you can compare deep and standard woodie versions of whatever grado you like after lary at headphile has touched them. they dont sound at all like eachother despite starting out as sr-the same number.
post #26 of 31

Ever hear of a Marimba? The RESONANT bars are made of either mahogany or rosewood. How about Wood Blocks used for sharp percussive effects in orchestras? Now, argue that hardwoods are not resonant.

post #27 of 31
Wow! An almost six year thread dredge! Is that a new record?
post #28 of 31

Hey, you found it!

Still a valid thread as far as content goes, headphones haven't changed much since then.

post #29 of 31

I wish there was an LCD X wood variant. :(

post #30 of 31

audeze just emailed me saying that ¬ 

 

Quote:
 

Hello Patrick,

Thank you for contacting us. I am sorry to inform you that fitting the X with wood rings would make the sound quality decrease. Some of us around the office have also asked the same question to our sound engineers and they are very stern about not doing that modification.

Have a great weekend.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › What does wood do to sound exactly in a headphone