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Marantz 2275 Repair: $400 - Is this right???

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I have had an old Marantz 2275 receiver just laying around for the last year that will not power up. I brought it to a local guy here in Austin who has worked on Marantz equipment for a long time, and I was shocked with the quote I received. In his words the repair would be "about 400 dollars". I trust this guy, but I just don't know what to do.

The receipt he gave me said that it "NEEDS RECAP PLUS LEFT CHANNEL REPAIR". Also stated was that in parts the cost is $160, and labor is $240. He said it would take him 4 hours to do it.

I understand that my Marantz has a lot of problems, but it just seems like way too much to me. I guess I am looking for a second opinion here, any feedback is greatly appreciated. Just ask if you need anymore info. Thanks guys.

-Craig
post #2 of 15
Does seem a bit steep, as that looks like not far off what those units are going for 2nd hand. Depends really on if you've got much sentimental attachment to that unit...
post #3 of 15
Yes, it's about right. I paid about $300 for my Marantz 2270 to be serviced and there was no major problems with it. It just needed to be cleaned and tuned up a bit. Nothing major.
post #4 of 15
We once spent $90 to fix a $250 TV. Tell me that wasn't stupid.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Now that I think about it, I don't know if I want to buy something like this secondhand. I may spend three or four hundred dollars on something that seems really nice, but a month later it could be in need of a four hundred dollar repair. I am the original owner of this.
post #6 of 15
While it might sound high to you, before spending the money to have it repaired, you might price out what a quality new 2 channel amp/receiver will cost. I think you will be shocked at how expensive they can be. It will make spending the money to get that one fixed seem more reasonable. Also the 2275 is one of the more desireable Marantz models.

I had a Marantz which I was the original owner of, it was a 4240. It started having problems, so I decided to seek a more modern model. Ended up getting a Denon. It was the biggest hi-fi mistake I have ever made. Black plastic constrution, and sounded like crap when compared to the vintage Marantz gear. After about a month of use the Denon went to the closet and has never been used since. I went out and found a good condition 2285 and have never looked back.

- augustwest
post #7 of 15
For 4 bills, I'll recap it with Black Gates, shower it in DeoxIT and even gift wrap it when you pick it up.
post #8 of 15
Thread Starter 
Ok, so if I do decide to go through with this, is there anything I should ask of him to make sure my Marantz is fixed up perfectly?
post #9 of 15
Drop 100 more on that figure and get a new model that will beat the dust of that oldie, and will be beter built, those old models usually has pin connectors for the speakers, and nickel plated jacks, most of the times all rusted by the age...I have a PM7200, and IMO it sounds miles ahead of those old receviers...

If you are 100% fond to those oldies, and want to have one so badly, just try to win this one, I do not think it will go that high...
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
I respect your opinion, but I have found the same results as augustwest. I think you would have to spend near $800 to compare with a lot of vintage equipment. I have demoed a lot of new stuff (with high price tags) in the last few years and I find myself disappointed every time. Of course, this is all just my opinion!
post #11 of 15
That's not that unreasonable a cost. If you're getting a full recap, four hours is reasonable. It usually takes 30-40 minutes just to disassemble and reassemble one of those. Going through 18-20 caps in three hours is reasonable, as well. I'm not sure what the left channel repair entails, but I don't think the request is too far off base.

I do like the older units. Generally, they use a higher quality transformer and power supply - those are important. Today, you generally get cheap parts since the manufacturers expect you to put it out on the curb after 4-5 years. Not so back then.

Another area the old units are much better in is the receiver section for the radio. Today they use a bunch of cheap crap because hardly anyone listens to the radio and they don't know any better. Back when FM was vital, they put in proper receiver circuits and built them to last. You won't get that in a newer unit. Same with the casing and build quality - that's tough to find south of four figures these days.

Considering that you can use it for a headphone amp, speaker amp, receiver, and a phono preamp, $400 is a bargain.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by texashorn91 View Post
I respect your opinion, but I have found the same results as augustwest. I think you would have to spend near $800 to compare with a lot of vintage equipment. I have demoed a lot of new stuff (with high price tags) in the last few years and I find myself disappointed every time. Of course, this is all just my opinion!
I have owned vintage amps my whole life, Pioneer, Technics, Sansui, Kenwood, Trio, Sony, Marantz, Luxman, along with tape decks, reel to reel, etc...first in my native country, and not becasue I want to have them, just because those were the only available, and I found them really cheap most of the times...Later on as soon as I came here the Salvation Army gave a couple of good surprises, but once I began to audition new stuff, there is no way I could go back...There is a lot of crap, I know that, but choosing wisely, and if you get discrete designs, (not IC based) today you can find a lot of killer amps out there, of course maybe not in Best Buys or Circuit City, (but even in those places, you can sometimes find one or another good model, from Denon, Yamaha, etc...) Aslo the so called "digital amps" are now hitting really hard...and the prices will go down overtime...

Vintage amps has their strenghts, they are build like tanks, they are mainly good designs, but also rarely you can find one that will work in Class-A, and today we have better parts if you look around, and you can choose similar designs as well. The pots they used to inlcude were IMO a joke in comparison to a good ALPS we have nowadays...the kind of transformers they used were more noisy than a good toroidal, the carbon based resistors they used, that people love so much becasue of the sound, tend to change their value overtime, and even if you find them in good shape, be prepared to replace a lot of them, that due ot the age will be in the limit of the span life, specially caps, pots, resistors, switches, etc...

But if you are happy with them, good for you, I will not be the one to tell you otherwise, but I suggest you, that just do not close the door to the new technology, and do not get crazy spending on old gear...
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
I think I'm going to go through with it. (That sounds way to serious!)

Is there anything important that I need to make sure he does when repairing it? I don't know how all of that works, and a little input will be very appreciated! Thanks a lot, guys.
post #14 of 15

pride in workmanship... things were made to last. i am the proud original owner of the 2275 and it works perfectly. i haven't heard anything new that has the warmth and fullness of sound. i saw one on ebay that was just rebuilt and they wanted $1200 for it.  my unit has no age damage on any of the connectors, it looks like new. 

post #15 of 15
Wow - your first post was an epic three-year thread from the dead dredge! But I love my 2275 too, so we will look past it biggrin.gif
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