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My first DSLR, and I have a $1000 budget...

post #1 of 105
Thread Starter 
Major edit: At post #94, I finally went through and bought the Canon Rebel XSi w/ kit lens! Thanks to all who helped (eventually) steer me through this experience!

Hey guys, I now know my budget for a DSLR, and I was wondering what is a fine balance of a nice entry-level DSLR and a few good lenses for around $1000.

I was thinking something along the lines of a Nikon D40(x), but any suggestions would be very welcome.

I'm going to Circuit City tomorrow where they have most of the "main" DSLR cameras, and I'm bringing an SD card and my laptop along, so I can see what they look like blown up on a 17" screen.

But in the meantime, I would appreciate any comments or guidance on what I should do to narrow my focus down.

Thanks!
post #2 of 105
D60, i say no to D40x, its like a D40...

with 1000$ budget, d60 (nikon), xti (canon) are both good and its not a "budget" dslr liek everyone else has.

if i were u, Id get either a XTi or D60(yes, not XSi) and then pair it up with used lens. ususally many photographers baby their lens, so you wouldnt have any problem buying used AND at a significantly cheaper price too.

remember this though: in terms of DSLR... its the LENS that matter most, the body comes 2nd.

also: once u stick with 1 company, chances are, ull never change over... cause lens only fit their own respective company =P.
post #3 of 105
Thread Starter 
I would prefer to go with Nikon, because they are a more "dedicated" camera company, but until you get to the D80, then you have a wide range of lens available to you, while with the XTi it looks like all the lens are already "unlocked" for you to use.

EDIT: Reading this huge thread right now about D40 vs. D60 vs. D80:

How did you decide to buy YOUR D40 vs. D60 vs. D80? [Page 1]: Nikon D80/D70/D60/D50/D40 Forum: Digital Photography Review
post #4 of 105
Based on your budget, I think the Nikon D40 will be one to get. My friend just bought one for AU$1300+, it came with a tripod and a flash.
post #5 of 105
We got my father a D40 for Christmas 2007. He absolutely loves it. I think the photo quality is as good as my D70s, and it is nearly as functional.

Funny this comes up because this morning I went and got him the 55-200mm VR lens for Father's Day. We haven't given the lens a try yet, but it should see some action tomorrow.

The 18-55mm D40 kit lens takes some nice photos and I've been pleased with it. I also use the 18-70mm kit lens that came with the D70s, as well as the 70-300mm and 50mm prime. They all take great photos and have (mostly) killed any lingering upgraditis. I've been eyeing a nice macro lens, but that will likely be my last lens purchase for a long time.
post #6 of 105
Rebel XTi gets my vote.

My dad has a D40 and it's good too.
post #7 of 105
You could look at the comparison chart on Nikon and see what you could
live with or without thats what I did which led to the d-80 and lens availability. Another important factor was how it felt in my hands.
post #8 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheMarchingMule View Post
I would prefer to go with Nikon, because they are a more "dedicated" camera company
Canon are just as good, and that's coming from a Nikon 'tard like me. The differences are minimal at best, so go for whichever one feels better in your hands.
post #9 of 105

Go d40 with 18-200 VR if you can

I have a d200 in the draw at home and hardly use it.

The d40 is a rocking good camera. Don't be misled by the megapixel myth. More does not equal great quality!
Don't feel shy about only a d40 around your neck. Remember it's the pictures you want to proud of not the machine that takes them.

If you were in front of a fantastic painting in an art museum, would you spend your time looking at the paint brush that the artist used or the painting itself?

Happy snapping!

Sceptre
post #10 of 105
Used Canon 20D with a Tamron 17-50mm f2.8. That will walk all over the Nikon entry level stuff.
post #11 of 105
I'd get an Canon XSi for a more modern camera or a Nikon D80.
post #12 of 105
I think the D40 is the best bang for the buck and you can spend the rest on lenses. The D60 and D40X are more money for a few extra megapixels.
post #13 of 105
In my experience, prime lenses (lenses with a fixed focal length) offer the best value and performance and generally trump zoom lenses of similar cost. Unfortunately, Nikon's entry level camera's can't AF with over 90% of Nikon's prime lenses as you probably know - so I'd suggest sticking with an entry level Canon and dumping the rest into, say, a 50mm f/1.4, and an 85mm f/1.8.
post #14 of 105
i dont know what you mean by... canon isnt a "dedicated" photography company... but the last time I checked, MOST people were choosing 50/50 between canon and nikon.

IMO, id never get a d40, if i was go to into photography, id get at least a "step up". Many people say the D40 is the best "bang for bucks"... but then a lot of people say D60 is too.. (its like the arguement between best bang for SR60 vs SR80)
post #15 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by TSi View Post
i dont know what you mean by... canon isnt a "dedicated" photography company... but the last time I checked, MOST people were choosing 50/50 between canon and nikon.

IMO, id never get a d40, if i was go to into photography, id get at least a "step up". Many people say the D40 is the best "bang for bucks"... but then a lot of people say D60 is too.. (its like the arguement between best bang for SR60 vs SR80)
If the D40 had an autofocus motor, I'd recommend it everytime to over 90% of people. Unless you're really looking for a pro-quality build and a few extra features, there's nothing "inhibiting" about even the most entry-level SLR; they take great pictures, have a nice form factor, and, with the exception of continuous shooting speed, compare competiitvely performance wise with many more expensive models.

The only real difference in quality I've noticed moving from a D40 to a D200, for instance, stems from the pro-grade lenses I've used with it - in terms of megapixels, the jump from 6 to 10 really isn't as pronounced as many people imagine.

So, again, I'm standing by my recommendation for the Canon XTi or even XT, because they can all use high end lenses while leaving you the budget to accommodate them.
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