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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 224

post #3346 of 3555

I always ride with a tube and pump (road and mountain) and I've flatted on both.  But they're few and far between.  I've never flatted due to running over something and getting it lodged in my tube.  What happened to me is if the tires aren't pumped up enough you'll get a  snake bite.  I don't find any difference between road and MTB as far as flats go.

post #3347 of 3555

I've had my share of both types of flats. I watch the road as close as possible for debris - glass, rocks, nails, screws and anything that can screw with inflation. :rolleyes: But sometimes pedestrians and traffic force me to run over stuff with virtual fingers crossed "Please don't flat...". 

 

There are also moments in a ride where I'll purposely choose a debris strewn path in order to avoid a nasty severe pothole or something to avoid damage to my carbon bike/carbon rims. Better to fix a flat than the ride itself. 

 

On a serious side note, laws in California regarding the deaths of pedestrians and cyclists need amending badly. Motorists are getting away with murder even if they don't flee the scene of the crime. :angry_face: 


Edited by Silent One - 4/29/14 at 1:19am
post #3348 of 3555

The years of memories with road bikes and California road technique against flats. We would look down for glass and even try to brush off our front and back tire while riding to remove glass sticking on the tire from not eventually becoming impregnated into the rubber.

 

There was the off time when a shard was 1/2 way in the tire and the protruding part would cut your hand as it came around. That was rare but I like many didn't wear gloves so it was always a possibility.

 

In the seventies they had these little wire loops which would rub against to top (road contact) area of your tire to brush off glass.

 

 

I ride now in a third world country and glass is too valuable, so no one ever throws it onto the street but saves it. It is never on the road like California.


Edited by Redcarmoose - 4/27/14 at 11:03pm
post #3349 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
  Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

The years of memories with road bikes and California road technique against flats. We would look down for glass and even try to brush off our front and back tire while riding to remove glass sticking on the tire from not eventually becoming impregnated into the rubber.

 

There was the off time when a shard was 1/2 way in the tire and the protruding part would cut your hand as it came around. That was rare but I like many didn't wear gloves so it was always a possibility.

 

In the seventies they had these little wire loops which would rub against to top (road contact) area of your tire to brush off glass.

 

 

I ride now in a third world country and glass is too valuable, so no one ever throws it onto the street but saves it. It is never on the road like California.

This is amazing to hear! Wish more folks had incentive to do the right thing regarding litter and beautification here in Cali.

post #3350 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

This is amazing to hear! Wish more folks had incentive to do the right thing regarding litter and beautification here in Cali.

No there is trash everywhere as littering is not enforced, just not glass.:o

 

I remember when there was litter in California in the 1970s.

post #3351 of 3555
^lolz
post #3352 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 
 

No there is trash everywhere as littering is not enforced, just not glass.:o

 

I remember when there was litter in California in the 1970s.

:p Obviously I was expanding on your theme with a whole lotta hope! It'd be great if people took pride and were emotionally invested in their surroundings. But there is nuthin' like value or scarcity for that swift kick into action. 

post #3353 of 3555
I'm still surprised at the amount of people that don't wash their hands after using the restroom, let alone littering problems. But this stuff is just the tip of the iceberg my fruend. I'm purty sure I've lost some of my sanity from all the things I notice. I mostly taken an observer role in all of it but do lose my self at times, speaking my mind out loud.

I witnessed a guy get mad at people leaving trash on the table, proceed to slap said trash unto the floor, and comment, "people are such animals". I asked him if he plans to pick it up(in vain I'm sure) and he said no. I let him know about the irony I just witnessed, we laughed, I picked up the trash.... (T_T)<- me inside.

Still, I've found some solace in laughing it off... some.
post #3354 of 3555

My last two rides the past week in warm temps under the cover of darkness got me thinking...before I get killed...I should invest in a lighting system for my Cervelo. Perhaps, a hi-tech German offering. What are some of you using for night rides?

:popcorn:

post #3355 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

My last two rides the past week in warm temps under the cover of darkness got me thinking...before I get killed...I should invest in a lighting system for my Cervelo. Perhaps, a hi-tech German offering. What are some of you using for night rides?

:popcorn:

The answer is a resounding YES.

 

Depend$ what you are after. If it is "only" repeatedly carrying your head home on the shoulders, can be as lowly as ( or similar too ) :

 

http://www.dx.com/p/bicycle-led-cobra-style-silicone-safety-light-grey-white-red-249653#.U2IXx_l_v9Q

 

http://www.dx.com/p/2-led-3-mode-white-red-light-fog-bicycle-lights-black-pair-2-cr2032-51737#.U2IkKPl_v9Q

 

Testing this on open road in pitch black night produces the desired result - vehicles will change their long lights to short lights at a very comfortable , but above all safe distance ; if you position the rear red LED safety light correctly, the same for the vehicles coming from behind. Front "light" is even "enough" to dimly lit the road in front of you, FAR better condition than using no lightingat all. Best of all - these silicone lights are small, light, can be permanently attached to the bike, batteries last surprisingly long time ( setting the mode to blinking will make you "annoyingly" visible and save on battery life ...) - kinda hard impossible to forget to take them with you on the ride. At 5 or so $, absolutely no excuse it is expensive...

 

It is also po$$ible to $pend a$olutely $illy money - but there are reasonable priced models both for front more serious lighting

http://www.dx.com/p/solar-power-self-recharge-bicycle-3-white-led-front-light-3-red-led-safety-tail-light-2-aa-46717#.U2IlWPl_v9Q

as well as the rear one  http://www.dx.com/p/essen-el-605r-6-mode-5-led-red-light-bicycle-safety-tail-lamp-black-white-218049#.U2Ia-fl_v9Q

 

Here a nice vid on the above rear safety light - that somewhat helps adding aero feature to a common round seat post :

 

http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XNDg3MzI2NTU2.html

 

I used to go out on the ride in the hot summer late afternoons>evenings, to escape the greatest heat - returning at dusk or even night.

 

BLINK -blink -BLINK -blink .... - many safe kilometers/miles everyone !


Edited by analogsurviver - 5/1/14 at 5:32am
post #3356 of 3555

"Collateral damage # XY" -

 

 http://www.dx.com/p/vertu-ccav-s-cycling-bike-bicycle-hollow-out-seat-saddle-black-230766#.U2JI7Pl_v9Q

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-Multi-Color-Comfort-VERTU-CCAV-S-Cycling-Bike-Bicycle-Hollow-Out-Seat-Saddle/251328102406?_trksid=p2047675.c100010.m2109&_trkparms=aid%3D555012%26algo%3DP

 

This does look tempting :evil: - review from dealextreme says it can also support heavier riders. And unlikely someone will come up with yet more "ventilation" :cool: .

 

Some more research basically says unfortunately it is a waste of money : http://www.amazon.com/Lerway%C2%AE-CCAV-S-Cycling-Bicycle-Hollow/product-reviews/B00ESV8FW2/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1&sortBy=bySubmissionDateDescending

 

Wonder how does the original Tioga sadle fare in the long run ?


Edited by analogsurviver - 5/1/14 at 6:43am
post #3357 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

My last two rides the past week in warm temps under the cover of darkness got me thinking...before I get killed...I should invest in a lighting system for my Cervelo. Perhaps, a hi-tech German offering. What are some of you using for night rides?

:popcorn:

 

 

What is your budget? I use a Dinotte 300R or a Niteflux Redzone 8. Also had a Dinotte 400R which is more compact than the 300R, but has a bit more power and has an external battery. These lights are pretty effective during day light hours as well.

 

Dinotte is better known for quality, the Redzone has superior side visibility.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #3358 of 3555
If you are DIY inclined at all, making some lights out of LED's is cheap (well it can be), and rewarding.

My home built was around $200 (bars and helmet) and is ~several thousand lumen, more than enough for full speed DH down twisty trails at night. Or for blinding car traffic wink.gif. For in town riding I use a single bar light

It's time to update mine to li-Po batteries as they use heavy ni-mh right now
Edited by ferday - 5/1/14 at 8:28am
post #3359 of 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post


Them pictures... 👍

I've used my flashlight before but a dedicated bike light should be better I hope. My current set up is a Fenix PD35 flashlight, ORBTRONIC rechargeable, and XTAR VP1 charger. I DIY'ed the mount.

post #3360 of 3555

Thanks everyone! Looking good, pigmode! I've always had the Schwinn outfitted, updating the lighting system now and then with something newer. Still have the last one that's easily detachable and could simply transfer it over.

 

But no...

nea

 

I want the newest ride to have the newest tech. :wink:

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