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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 218

post #3256 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by musicmonkey View Post
 

Cheers Bluenote1553, once your muscles get used to it an SS is alright for the hills as long as they are short n' sweet and you can power up them before your lungs try and climb out of your chest - but i admit now that i've crept out of my 30's (gulp!) a few gears on a bike makes sense.

 

I like the matching accessories that come with the cargo bike above, are they an optional extra or do they both come as standard?:bigsmile_face:

Unfortunately aside from the short climbs, there are some longer ones to contend with. I also begin my rides with descents as I live UP from everthing in my town so the ride home is what does me in. Lil bit past 40 myself and time seems to be catching me faster that I'd like. I'm sure there is a slight extra charge for the lovelies!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

Couple of my friends have cargo bikes. I'd rather not go that route, but carrying groceries tends to alter ones perceptions, desires. Still need to try out my new and bigger backpack, a missionworkshop Fitzroy.

Like to see some pics of you new pack, pigmode. I have been throwing around the idea of a Seagull courier bag myself:

 

http://seagullbags.com/site//

post #3257 of 3879
Will try to get a pic. Here's what I've been using on commutes, a Chrome Bravo which is a pretty good size at 22L. Still while carrying a good load, trying to get at the U lock and cables multiple times during a ride is a major hassle.

So I'm riding a single speed and loving it. Get the correct gearing for your ride profile as well as your conditioning. Of course with SS setting up for the hills often compromises speed on the flats. I have a 32x18 and find it great for my favorite 1700' climb. On the flats I spin out at 17mph, and can't hold 15.5 mph for very long because of the rpm.



post #3258 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

Will try to get a pic. Here's what I've been using on commutes, a Chrome Bravo which is a pretty good size at 22L. Still while carrying a good load, trying to get at the U lock and cables multiple times during a ride is a major hassle.

So I'm riding a single speed and loving it. Get the correct gearing for your ride profile as well as your conditioning. Of course with SS setting up for the hills often compromises speed on the flats. I have a 32x18 and find it great for my favorite 1700' climb. On the flats I spin out at 17mph, and can't hold 15.5 mph for very long because of the rpm.



I have a pocket with a lock in it, pigmode, but it doesn't get much use in the my town. If I am out on a cruise, generally I leave her in one gear. 

 

1700' climb makes you a harder man than I. Would be a bit of a mess with a SS after that ride, fo sho!

post #3259 of 3879

As soon as I got back to the US, I did my tax return and ordered a new bike.  This time I bought a mini velo from a company I never heard of named Alton.  

http://www.altonus.com/altonusweb2014/?wpsc-product=mini-velo-duplicate

Actually until recently, I didn't pay much attention to mini velos until I went to Japan again.  I should have bought one when I was in Japan, but I wasn't in dire need of a new bike.

 

I did some research and couldn't really find many negatives for a mini velo except that it's more bumpy with smaller road tires - And it is!

Will get some Easton grips again because they worked well on my last bike to absorb the bumps.  Will get a new saddle too, because the stock one hurts my butt.

 

Going from a 30lb bike to a 22lb bike is kinda exciting.  My last bike had a really short gear ratio, which was good for blasting off from stoplights and climbing hills in my area.  I kinda want to replicate it with this bike, but the smaller wheel has me confused on gear ratio.  Currently it has a 48T chainring with 18T freewheel.  I'm not sure how it would react with a smaller chainring.

Just got it the other day and haven't had a chance to really ride it.  Only rode it down the street T^T

 

 


Edited by PFULMTL - 3/8/14 at 8:33pm
post #3260 of 3879

:wink_face: Sunday... get down the street!

 

Congrats on the new ride!

:beerchug:

post #3261 of 3879

Cool how the brake cable sleeves match that graphic on the seat tube.

post #3262 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post

As soon as I got back to the US, I did my tax return and ordered a new bike.  This time I bought a mini velo from a company I never heard of named Alton.  
http://www.altonus.com/altonusweb2014/?wpsc-product=mini-velo-duplicate
Actually until recently, I didn't pay much attention to mini velos until I went to Japan again.  I should have bought one when I was in Japan, but I wasn't in dire need of a new bike.

I did some research and couldn't really find many negatives for a mini velo except that it's more bumpy with smaller road tires - And it is!
Will get some Easton grips again because they worked well on my last bike to absorb the bumps.  Will get a new saddle too, because the stock one hurts my butt.

Going from a 30lb bike to a 22lb bike is kinda exciting.  My last bike had a really short gear ratio, which was good for blasting off from stoplights and climbing hills in my area.  I kinda want to replicate it with this bike, but the smaller wheel has me confused on gear ratio.  Currently it has a 48T chainring with 18T freewheel.  I'm not sure how it would react with a smaller chainring.
Just got it the other day and haven't had a chance to really ride it.  Only rode it down the street T^T








Neat ride!

For gear info, try here http://sheldonbrown.com/gears/
It will directly compare your old ratio to the new one with tire size etc taken into account. The same gain ratio/gear inches means the exact same feel at the pedals regardless of tire diameter

I had a killer ride today on my fixie which I haven't ridden in a long while (winter!). Man am I out of single gear shape!
Edited by ferday - 3/9/14 at 4:35pm
post #3263 of 3879

Did an 18 mile ride earlier today on the new bike.  I had a little kid tell me "cool bike!".  Also overheard someone passing by say "hey, a mini velo!", along with many looks.

 

I can definitely say that the smaller wheel is much more agile.  Now I understand why they are so popular in Asian cities.  Good for zig zagging through pedestrians, cars, and other obstacles.

I dig the wheels and tires.  It had very little rolling resistance and I was able to coast for very long distances.
I think the gearing was fine, but I'm going to try a slightly smaller 42T chainring because I like a little faster acceleration and hill climbing ability.

 

I really want to get into downhill mountain biking this year because I didn't last year.  Can I have too many outdoor hobbies?  I rallycross in the summer, but only once or twice a month.   However, I will probably pick up a bike, and have it just in case I don't have a race on the weekend. 

 

I still have my eye on the Specialized P3.

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/bmxdirt-jump/pseries/p3


Edited by PFULMTL - 3/9/14 at 9:45pm
post #3264 of 3879

Your account makes me wanna joy ride it some and check it out! :D

post #3265 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post



I really want to get into downhill mountain biking this year because I didn't last year.  Can I have too many outdoor hobbies?  I rallycross in the summer, but only once or twice a month.   However, I will probably pick up a bike, and have it just in case I don't have a race on the weekend. 



 



I still have my eye on the Specialized P3.



http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/bmxdirt-jump/pseries/p3


 



as a former DH racer and current DH fun rider, i recommend getting a used heavy travel full suspension bike for DH playing. it's just so much fun to ride a couch!
i spent all my racing years on a shorter travel bike for the agility, but when i quit racing i got into a 9" travel monster and i've never had so much fun being stupid!
post #3266 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferday View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post
 


 

I really want to get into downhill mountain biking this year because I didn't last year.  Can I have too many outdoor hobbies?  I rallycross in the summer, but only once or twice a month.   However, I will probably pick up a bike, and have it just in case I don't have a race on the weekend. 

 

 

 

I still have my eye on the Specialized P3.

 

http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/bmxdirt-jump/pseries/p3

 



as a former DH racer and current DH fun rider, i recommend getting a used heavy travel full suspension bike for DH playing. it's just so much fun to ride a couch!
i spent all my racing years on a shorter travel bike for the agility, but when i quit racing i got into a 9" travel monster and i've never had so much fun being stupid!


So full suspension is like riding in a old Cadillac?  I have a strange fear that I will break a cheap bike, which in turn, could possibly break a bone or two.  I've seen some pictures of high end frames broken in half though.  It makes me wonder if the product was tested in those environments like cars are.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

Your account makes me wanna joy ride it some and check it out! :D

If you are ever in the Portland area, let me know.

post #3267 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post


So full suspension is like riding in a old Cadillac?  I have a strange fear that I will break a cheap bike, which in turn, could possibly break a bone or two.  I've seen some pictures of high end frames broken in half though.  It makes me wonder if the product was tested in those environments like cars are.


i've broken high end and cheap frames (and a dozen bones LOL). frame failure is normally rare...it's wheels followed by small components (seatposts, handlebars) that normally break first. A simple chain break In the wrong spot can be disastrous.

a good quality full suspension is safer, and usually more fun, for proper DH riding. a good DJ hardtail like the P3 is nice if you are going to use for urban assault, or at the skatepark etc. as well as some DH riding. dirt jumping is much easier on a hardtail but hitting large gaps or drops is not only harder, but much harder on the body using a hardtail.

here's my big DH bike
283765.JPG


and my hardtail DH bike
272546.JPG

And because why not, my light DH bike
283774.JPG
Edited by ferday - 3/10/14 at 4:45pm
post #3268 of 3879

I live in a good city for urban jumping.  I live down the street from an indoor/outdoor bike place that has all sorts of ramps, but you pay to get in.  Across the street from that building is a public skate park that is part of a school.  How cool is that?  However it is crowded there unless it is raining.  There are two more skate parks that I know of in the city that are also free.

 

Kool ride collection by the way!

 

 

edit.  Rode the mini velo on some hills yesterday in Portland, it's apparent that I should lower the gearing.  The uphills were killing me.


Edited by PFULMTL - 3/12/14 at 5:05pm
post #3269 of 3879

I normally do not shop for bicycle gear at Lidl or Hofer - but that mountain/race saddle 

http://www.lidl.ie/cps/rde/SID-9D8A3D81-0EE4C27E/www_lidl_ie/hs.xsl/Offers.htm?action=showDetail&id=3360  

did lure a whopping EUR 9.99 ( yes, in my country more expensive than in Ireland ... ) out of my pocket.  Wittkop is actually a saddle manufacturer with quite a "mileage" and tradition - and word has it these saddles are actually hand made in Italy - according to the "recipe" by Dr.med.Torsten Werlich . 

 

It proved to be a VERY good saddle - at least during the first 30 km or so ride. Hard enough to support on the climb, great cushioning when crossing less-than-ideal-filled -with-potholes roads - and it does not allow you to slip back and forth on it.  No sore points, gel working as it should. I am REALLY curious if it will stay that way in the long run - but 3 year warranty does inspire confidence !

 

Crazy how it shows pricing policies etc - normal price for this saddle in LBS is EUR 29.99, with Lidl action offer slashing that  to 1/3rd.  It is mind boggling to specuate how much do premium priced saddles actually cost the manufacturer ...

 

I will report how it goes after say first 500 or so km. If it does not desintegrate, deform etc - I *guess* I will have to include this purchase in best buy category. 

post #3270 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by analogsurviver View Post
 

 

I'll be on the side of the virtual road watching and see how things work out with your saddle. While my COBB Gen2 saddle cost me a bit more than I'd like to spend, so far so good.

 

Gen2Black.jpg 


Edited by Silent One - 3/16/14 at 2:34pm
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