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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 212

post #3166 of 3879

This is cool.  32 hour straight ride through French Alps.

 

Not riding here because it is really cold.  High today is 3 degrees!

post #3167 of 3879

  Quote:

Originally Posted by Icenine2 View Post
 

Treal512,

 

I can ride for sure.  I live outside Chicago and it is -8 right now not adding the wind chill which brings it down to -20 something.  No riding for me for months until Spring!

 

Ooh, I didn't connect the dots on that. I understand now, yes. Here in Texas near Austin I've been riding around in low 30s (winds making it feel a little colder), so I can't imagine what the Chicago area must be like. Yikes! I'll keep riding for all the shut-in northerners :)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carlrider View Post
 

Well, I am only going to ride throughout the city and on plain roads. Basically, I am going to ride that when I need to go to work apart from that on weekends I am going to use it for workout purpose. I believe that I can ride that it's not something rocket science that is difficult to do. I don't want to consider used bikes, especially when a new one is available at a cheap cost.

Quote:
Originally Posted by carlrider View Post
 

Hey Red, The bike looks good but my budget is max $300 but its a nice choice. I have seen a similar one for $219 at critical cycles. Here it is http://www.criticalcycles.com/white-black-fixed-gear-single-speed-fixie-with-pista-handlebars.html , they are also offering free shipping service. The bike looks good, what do you say about it ?

 

Yes, it is definitely not rocket science. Just don't forget to ride the bicycle after you buy it, haha!

As for Critical bikes, make sure you're getting the right size if you go with them. And by right size I don't mean a chart you can find on the internet. That can be a good starting point to find your frame size range, but your most accurate method of finding your frame size will be going to a bicycle shop to get sized. Afterwards, buy online if you're not going to get anything locally. I also noticed Critical has a fairly large sizing gap between the 53 and 60cm frames. Don't settle on frame sizes if you're buying new.

post #3168 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

 

I had a Mercier once it was great. These are $399 at

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/trackbikes.htm

 

The Windsor is $279 on that page.Free dilivery.

 

That's a good looking bike!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icenine2 View Post
 

This is cool.  32 hour straight ride through French Alps.

 

Not riding here because it is really cold.  High today is 3 degrees!

 

Nice find. I'm gonna watch this.

post #3169 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlrider View Post
 

Hey Red, The bike looks good but my budget is max $300 but its a nice choice. I have seen a similar one for $219 at critical cycles. Here it is http://www.criticalcycles.com/white-black-fixed-gear-single-speed-fixie-with-pista-handlebars.html , they are also offering free shipping service. The bike looks good, what do you say about it ?


That's why the link had a bike for $279. Maybe the Critical is perfect for $219. I have had some recent experience with low cost bikes. But not these fixies. I ride a Lemond that was about $700 in 08 as a fixie.

 

I do know though, that you don't want to get stuff that your always having to have worked on. This concept in this thread is ongoing it seems. An experienced bike repair guy can walk into a sale somewhere and find a 1980s or 1990s used bike and because of his experience can buy one that has potential, take off parts and add stuff and get a long lasting bike for $100-$200. That is because he knows what to look for in the used market, and repairs stuff himself.

 

 

The perfect shape $100 10-speed from the 1980s that was $1000 new are still out there but they are a find that comes with a ton of searching and luck. A lot of folks find a nice old bike that a friend owns and never thought about selling but does not ride.

 

That said the main issue with low cost bikes is how much use and abuse are they going to get. I purchased a $260 used 2012 mountain bike in January last year. I rode the piss out of it, going on 4 and 5 hour rides almost everyday for 10 months. I needed to have the bottom bracket redone twice  and the front and rear hubs repacked. So I did figure that I needed to upgrade, as the repairs are maybe a trend.

 

A better built bike will save you money in the long run. If you pay more up front you spend less on repairs down the road. But the experts that find super well built old bikes that are in great condition, can find a lower cost bike that requires less maintenance because of the potential for use and wear still left over.

 

I try and find a happy medium. I don't have a cheapo race bike yet but am looking at something like this Giant Defy 5 for $700. The issue with super low cost bikes are that you end up paying a lot in repairs down the road unless you can do it yourself.

 

The other thing is the ride. Better bikes are a joy to ride. There is also the safety factor. Most folks on this thread have had a chain slip 6 cogs during a sprint or climb and got a chance to taste some road. A more expensive and better maintained bike is safer and more fun to ride.

post #3170 of 3879

//raises hand for chain slip

 

I wouldn't mind that Critical Cycles bike for a commuter.  

I've never had a nice bike.  But I didn't start riding bikes again until the other year.  I'm still learning after every purchase.

After getting a cheap bike stolen last year, I think it's a good idea to have an inexpensive bike just for commuting.  Then have a nicer one for those times you just want to ride and don't have anywhere to be. 

 

 

//inserting random story

 

Since I've been in Japan, I didn't lock my bike for a month.  Part of it was because I didn't bring a lock with me to save weight in the luggage and didn't pick one up yet.  The other reason was because I wanted to really see how safe it is in Japan to leave your bike unlocked.  I lock it now, but I don't think I even need to.

Also I've been really lucky that I haven't been stopped by the police for not having a bike registered sticker.  There is no penalty for not having one, except getting questioned by the cops.


Edited by PFULMTL - 1/29/14 at 5:14am
post #3171 of 3879
No love for Wabi? If I get on roadbikes again it'll be a Wabi Classic, with Campy Pista cranks of course.
post #3172 of 3879
Wabi's are awesome! They are made with better lighter weight steel than your typical direct order bike or most any other steel bike. The owner/designer makes the bikes he wants to ride which are based on 1970's sports touring bikes. He prefers fixed but you can get the single speed as well. The geometry is for street riding not track and they come with front and rear brakes and are made for serious cyclists not fixi fashionistas.

I've been commuting on one here in Los Angeles for 4 years with zero problems and almost no maintenance. Check out these bikes and then call and talk to Richard (owner) with any questions http://www.wabicycles.com/index.html

BTW, Richard and his brother originally started Performance Bicycle. That's how he has such good manufacturer connections and can get what he wants made for his boutique bike company.
post #3173 of 3879

I was so close to ordering one, but need time off the road to heal a bulged disc at l4-l5. The plan is to make the Wabi my go to roadbike, at least until I start climbing hills again.

post #3174 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by treal512 View Post
 

  Quote:

 

Yes, it is definitely not rocket science. Just don't forget to ride the bicycle after you buy it, haha!

As for Critical bikes, make sure you're getting the right size if you go with them. And by right size I don't mean a chart you can find on the internet. That can be a good starting point to find your frame size range, but your most accurate method of finding your frame size will be going to a bicycle shop to get sized. Afterwards, buy online if you're not going to get anything locally. I also noticed Critical has a fairly large sizing gap between the 53 and 60cm frames. Don't settle on frame sizes if you're buying new.

Hey treal, that is a really helpful tip. Thanks, I appreciate that. I like the bicycles at critical cycles and I was thinking to get the same. So, as of now I would require to get the desired frame size range from a bicycle shop. I will have to do that quick because I can't wait to ride that bike. I am so excited!!! :)

post #3175 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 


That's why the link had a bike for $279. Maybe the Critical is perfect for $219. I have had some recent experience with low cost bikes. But not these fixies. I ride a Lemond that was about $700 in 08 as a fixie.

 

I do know though, that you don't want to get stuff that your always having to have worked on. This concept in this thread is ongoing it seems. An experienced bike repair guy can walk into a sale somewhere and find a 1980s or 1990s used bike and because of his experience can buy one that has potential, take off parts and add stuff and get a long lasting bike for $100-$200. That is because he knows what to look for in the used market, and repairs stuff himself.

 

 

The perfect shape $100 10-speed from the 1980s that was $1000 new are still out there but they are a find that comes with a ton of searching and luck. A lot of folks find a nice old bike that a friend owns and never thought about selling but does not ride.

 

That said the main issue with low cost bikes is how much use and abuse are they going to get. I purchased a $260 used 2012 mountain bike in January last year. I rode the piss out of it, going on 4 and 5 hour rides almost everyday for 10 months. I needed to have the bottom bracket redone twice  and the front and rear hubs repacked. So I did figure that I needed to upgrade, as the repairs are maybe a trend.

 

A better built bike will save you money in the long run. If you pay more up front you spend less on repairs down the road. But the experts that find super well built old bikes that are in great condition, can find a lower cost bike that requires less maintenance because of the potential for use and wear still left over.

 

I try and find a happy medium. I don't have a cheapo race bike yet but am looking at something like this Giant Defy 5 for $700. The issue with super low cost bikes are that you end up paying a lot in repairs down the road unless you can do it yourself.

 

The other thing is the ride. Better bikes are a joy to ride. There is also the safety factor. Most folks on this thread have had a chain slip 6 cogs during a sprint or climb and got a chance to taste some road. A more expensive and better maintained bike is safer and more fun to ride.

Red, I understand your concern and got your point regarding the low cost bikes i.e. you end up spending more money on repairs. Firstly, I am not getting a used bike. Secondly, I have read the reviews about their bicycles on the internet and also on their website. Everybody has said fairly good about the bicycles. Moreover, I am going to use it for commuting to work purpose, therefore, it won't be of much expense though I am going to ride it daily and on weekends I am going to use it for workout purpose as they are good for legs. I think I'll settle down with this one because my budget is not upto $700. May be in future, I'll think about it. But for now, this cheap fixed gear bike will do :)
I liked the way you explained the things.

post #3176 of 3879

I had an idea last night and wanted to put it into use today, but it was raining.  I tied my camera (Son NEX) strap to the top handle of my backpack and put my head through the loop of the camera...  The camera was snug around my throat.  The weight of the backpack keeps the camera from moving down.  However, I need to make it aim higher since when I ride my bike I lean forward.  I could lower the seat all the way down though.

I could make a cheap mount for the handlebar, but it is more prone to shaking that way, and it takes away from the immersive feeling.

Expect a montage of my next long ride once I figure this out.

 


Edited by PFULMTL - 1/30/14 at 3:53am
post #3177 of 3879
Quote:

Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post

 

//raises hand for chain slip



 



I wouldn't mind that Critical Cycles bike for a commuter.  



I've never had a nice bike.  But I didn't start riding bikes again until the other year.  I'm still learning after every purchase.



After getting a cheap bike stolen last year, I think it's a good idea to have an inexpensive bike just for commuting.  Then have a nicer one for those times you just want to ride and don't have anywhere to be. 



 





I totally agree with you PFULMTL, this is what I had always in mind, since I need to get a bike for commuting to work and just to exercise my legs, therefore, such a cheap bike would be best suitable for me. There is no point to buy an expensive bike for that purpose and moreover, if its stolen, you won't regret buying that bike. Critical cycles have definitely got some nice bikes.

post #3178 of 3879
Quote:
Originally Posted by carlrider View Post
 
Quote:
 
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post

 

//raises hand for chain slip

 

 

 

I wouldn't mind that Critical Cycles bike for a commuter.  

 

I've never had a nice bike.  But I didn't start riding bikes again until the other year.  I'm still learning after every purchase.

 

After getting a cheap bike stolen last year, I think it's a good idea to have an inexpensive bike just for commuting.  Then have a nicer one for those times you just want to ride and don't have anywhere to be. 

 

 

 

I totally agree with you PFULMTL, this is what I had always in mind, since I need to get a bike for commuting to work and just to exercise my legs, therefore, such a cheap bike would be best suitable for me. There is no point to buy an expensive bike for that purpose and moreover, if its stolen, you won't regret buying that bike. Critical cycles have definitely got some nice bikes.


Don't know about that. My Trek 700 was stolen and I was mightily PO'd about it.

post #3179 of 3879

Pics from todays ride to Abiko, which is about 15 miles Northeast from my apartment in Horikirishobuen.  Made it there in time for sunset.  I got lost on the way back, and had to go back to the right street two times, so add a few extra miles to todays total.

My body was not ready.  Recovering from being sick for a week, I had to get out.  I've just started to learn Lightroom and so I used this trip as a RAW test.  If they look funny, I'm still trying to get used to the program. :P

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by PFULMTL - 2/2/14 at 7:58am
post #3180 of 3879
I never knew it was possible to be in a place or even take pictures in Tokyo without a single soul in sight. Nicely done!
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