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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 189

post #2821 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post
 

Some pics from todays travels.

 

 

 

 

 

I got a chance to test my top speed with the current 28T/16T gearing with a speed detector that normally monitors cars.  Was only able to hit 18MPH with the current gearing.  That's OK I guess, but I'd be comfortable being able to max out at around 25MPH.

 

 

That's what it is all about. Air and sunshine.

post #2822 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post
 

Some pics from todays travels.

 

Gaw! Where do you live? It's beautiful.

 

And why are you so angry?! Omg! Good article. I just sold (money reasons) my SS :(

post #2823 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 

Angry, Maybe, Against the grain, allways.

 

Reminds me of beat up drift or rallycross cars.  It may not look pretty, but it's enough to go out there and have some fun.


Edited by PFULMTL - 10/13/13 at 10:06pm
post #2824 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by treal512 View Post
 

 

Gaw! Where do you live? It's beautiful.

 

And why are you so angry?! Omg! :D

That's the Columbia River by PDX airport.

post #2825 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 

Angry, Maybe, Against the grain, allways.

 

What better than a bad pic of a wreck of a bike.

 

 

That seat level reminds me of my smallest frame in use.

post #2826 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

That seat level reminds me of my smallest frame in use.


Known as the "Roadie Rake" old habits die hard. I actually have a Giant I built that is even smaller, the concept being more of a geared BMX bike. The seatpost on that I had to build.

 

That trimble looks suspiciously like the old AlpineStars bike. Is that what became of it?

post #2827 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PFULMTL View Post
 

Got around to converting my Fuji Folder to singlespeed.  I still need a new crankset.  Running on the 28T chainring haha, and 16T ACS Crossfire Pro freewheel.  It feels like a 26" BMX.  I can hillclimb very easily, but I need more top end speed.  I'd be fine with a 32-34T chainring.

It's still kinda heavy at 29bs...might swap out the stock handlebar and seatpost.  Too poor for anything else.

 

28:16!? with slicks like that you must be riding on roads... I can't imagine even bothering riding with a gear ratio like that... I crank a 53:17 on my singlespeed, on anything that isn't uphill I always feel like it needs to be a little higher still, but uphills it's a bitch, I do have to really put my head down and keep the pedals spinning... I do love single speeds though :]
Just wow, you really need a bigger chainring if you don't want to be spinning like mad at 20kmph or so 0.o
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by joshwalnut View Post
 

I know the differences between a fixed gear and a free wheel... fixed gears are usually single speed.. hence why i asked.. lol

 

I've heard good things about fixed gear, something to do with better momentum... not entirely sure how the science works... maybe the same idea as with clipless pedals? 

 

Well where i live i doubt "i" could use a single speed because the hills are so steep and long.. if i stayed in the same gear when going my normal speed when i'm on flat ground and try to climb some hills here, i would have to get off my bike and walk up. Actually i had a single speed stunt bike when i was a kid and i could never make it up those hills no matter how fast i got going... that had puny tires too.


I've never heard of a fixed geared bike with a derailleur, that would be an awful idea, every gear change would be a dance with death.
The idea behind fixed gear is that there is absolutely minimum loss of power between your legs and the road, that's why they use them for track cycling, On road a fixed gear turns into
a bit of a thrill thing, especially for those that ride without brakes, you have to use your legs to resist the cranks turning in order to slow down, or lock them and throw your weight over the handlebars to skid (which from the part of me that likes being alive, is a bloody stupid thing to do) Hence it being a thrill seekers kind of bike anywhere other than the confines of a velodrome. Other cool things that come as a result though, are being able to ride backwards and pull off epic trackstands.
Clipless pedals are however a fantastic way of increasing your power output, your foot is attached to the pedal, so you not only push on the pedal, but also pull on it, so you get power out of your whole pedal stroke, not just half of it.

post #2828 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


Known as the "Roadie Rake" old habits die hard. I actually have a Giant I built that is even smaller, the concept being more of a geared BMX bike. The seatpost on that I had to build.

 

That trimble looks suspiciously like the old AlpineStars bike. Is that what became of it?

No, This was in fact the second carbon mountain bike ever made late 1980s. He also built the first carbon mountain bike and first carbon road bike. Brent Trimble then sold the company to Schwinn who continued to make his carbon road bikes. They may still make em? Brent also started to reintroduce the Trimble X-Frame in 2006.

 

The Brent Trimble Patent:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4923203.html

 

News here....

 

http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2006/news/02-10

 

 

 

 

Buy em here..........

 

http://trimblemtb.com/Main.html

 

 

 

 

 

Amazingly, my bike and this one were made in 1991.:D 

 

 

 

The Kestrel was the first successful selling carbon road bike. That is why Schwinn purchased it.


Edited by Redcarmoose - 10/13/13 at 11:05pm
post #2829 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

No, This was in fact the second carbon mountain bike ever made late 1980s. He also built the first carbon mountain bike and first carbon road bike. Brent Trimble then sold the company to Schwinn who continued to make his carbon road bikes. They may still make em? Brent also started to reintroduce the Trimble X-Frame in 2006.

 

The Brent Trimble Patent:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4923203.html

 

News here....

 

http://autobus.cyclingnews.com/tech.php?id=tech/2006/news/02-10

 

 

 

 

Buy em here..........

 

http://trimblemtb.com/Main.html

 

 

 

 

 

Amazingly, my bike and this one were made in 1991.:D 

 

 

 

The Kestrel was the first successful selling carbon road bike. That is why Schwinn purchased it.


I wonder if Trimble did the design work for alpinestars?

 

Oh I remember the kestrel quite well. We had one in town for a while and I happened to be in the shop when he brought it in with a cracked seat tube. New frame time.

post #2830 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


I wonder if Trimble did the design work for alpinestars?

 

Oh I remember the kestrel quite well. We had one in town for a while and I happened to be in the shop when he brought it in with a cracked seat tube. New frame time.

 

 

Weight of this frame is 2 pounds 9 ounces. I have cracked a Kestrel 4000 myself. Never this bike. I think it is more strong? I have an 8 speed corn cob rear cassette and three front chain rings with the middle a classic shimano ( oval ) Bio-rhythm chain ring.

 

 

 

I would think that they copied him as his patient is for carbon only.


Edited by Redcarmoose - 10/13/13 at 11:22pm
post #2831 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

 

Weight of this frame is 2 pounds 9 ounces.

 

 

I would think that they copied him as his patient is for carbon only.


I would not think they'd risk the chance when they could just pay him. It's not like they had any in house expertise, they would have had to go outsource anyway.

 

Scary when you think how far frames have come and how little advancement has been made in the drivetrain. Ti cogs are about as far as it's gone.

post #2832 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post
 


I would not think they'd risk the chance when they could just pay him. It's not like they had any in house expertise, they would have had to go outsource anyway.

 

Scary when you think how far frames have come and how little advancement has been made in the drivetrain. Ti cogs are about as far as it's gone.

 

Chain used 1880 -1890  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_bicycle

So true,   !!!     that our chain drives are almost the same as when they first appeared in the late 1800s after the big wheel chain-less bikes. I have seen belt and drive shaft bikes with transmissions. You would think all expensive bikes now would have drive shaft/transmission power transfers.:confused: Chains still have the same qwerks they have had for over 100 years. Why?


Edited by Redcarmoose - 10/13/13 at 11:31pm
post #2833 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

 

So true,   !!!     that our chain drives are almost the same as when they first appeared in the late 1800s after the big wheel chain-less bikes. I have seen belt and drive shaft bikes with transmissions. You would think all expensive bikes now would have drive shaft/transmission power transfers.:confused: Chains still have the same qwerks they have had for over 100 years. Why?


Chain is still the most efficient power transfer mechanism. I thought Honda was on to something when they introduced the RN01 with the enclosed transmission. They won their cup and buggered off.

 

post #2834 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post
 

28:16!? with slicks like that you must be riding on roads... I can't imagine even bothering riding with a gear ratio like that... I crank a 53:17 on my singlespeed, on anything that isn't uphill I always feel like it needs to be a little higher still, but uphills it's a bitch, I do have to really put my head down and keep the pedals spinning... I do love single speeds though :]
Just wow, you really need a bigger chainring if you don't want to be spinning like mad at 20kmph or so 0.o
 

 


I've never heard of a fixed geared bike with a derailleur, that would be an awful idea, every gear change would be a dance with death.
 

 

you can't use a fixed gear with anything on the back, derailleur or tensioner.  when you pedaled backwards it would literally blow up the device

 

there are some sturney archer 3-spd hubs that are fixed gear

 

as for the chain drive, chains are very nearly 100% efficient.  a shaft drive would be lucky to hit 80% and they are complex and prone to breakdown.  belts are highly efficient but have their own set of problems...once someone makes a really light gearbox that works well bikes will probably all be belt drive with a gearbox.  there are a few good examples of gearbox bikes out there (nicolai), but the vast majority are DH bikes since the weight and lack of gear choice isn't really as big a deal.  


Edited by ferday - 10/14/13 at 11:08am
post #2835 of 3475

A bicyclist's worst enemy... 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

 

lol, on my last bike ride i must have dodged at least 50 of those caterpillars.. they come out of nowhere!!

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