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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 183

post #2731 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post


I'm also 5'11, I ride Large frames o.0 I've been professionally fitted twice, both times they looked at me, put me on a medium. On both occasions the medium felt cramped and didn't sit well,

On a large frame I fit very well, I never feel over stretched or bunched up, on my road and mountain bike.

I could never imagine riding a bike with a small frame seriously 0.o

That being said, my Flatmate is 5'10.5 and rides a medium, he looks natural on a medium frame, and really really awkward and stretched and unstable on a large.

so I guess at 5'11 a medium is reasonable too. Just something I can't do....

Nice to see you on a new bike though biggrin.gif

 


Years ago we would stand with the top tube under our crotch. On road bikes it was actually pretty easy. They say always ride the smallest frame you can. On the small I was really not over the pedals. I was behind em.


It seems spin positioning is the true key here. There is a perfect place to be over the pedals I think. Truly every bike design is different. It's the geometry, as some bikes just have long top tubes. Plus every person is different as far as back measurements, leg measurements.


You should ride what your comfortable with. The fitters are using a cookie cutter science and the variables are more than that. My Specialized FSR Pro in medium fits best. After years I'd have to say my Lemond is too big. That's the strange part is that you can come to conclusions even after a year or two?


There are rules here. Still if you were riding PCH and this super fast guy passed you on a way, way too small of frame there was always that question. Weight to power ratio?

Would the guy be that fast on anything?


Answer number two is maybe the correct answer.
post #2732 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post


Years ago we would stand with the top tube under our crotch. On road bikes it was actually pretty easy. They say always ride the smallest frame you can. On the small I was really not over the pedals. I was behind em.


It seems spin positioning is the true key here. There is a perfect place to be over the pedals I think. Truly every bike design is different. It's the geometry, as some bikes just have long top tubes. Plus every person is different as far as back measurements, leg measurements.


You should ride what your comfortable with. The fitters are using a cookie cutter science and the variables are more than that. My Specialized FSR Pro in medium fits best. After years I'd have to say my Lemond is too big. That's the strange part is that you can come to conclusions even after a year or two?


There are rules here. Still if you were riding PCH and this super fast guy passed you on a way, way too small of frame there was always that question. Weight to power ratio?

Would the guy be that fast on anything?


Answer number two is maybe the correct answer.

I do agree with the riding what feels right, and and being in the right position, I don't agree with the cookie cutter science.
The science behind it, is getting your body set up so your legs are sitting in the right position for spinning, with the right extension, they do that, then they set your bars up so that your back and arms are in a relaxed, sensible position. it's nothing complicated really.
Biomechanics is a serious science, I don't think cookie cutter fit really describes a proper fitting of a bike.
Obviously they can be done that way, but that's what I'd call a bad fitting.
 

post #2733 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post
 

I do agree with the riding what feels right, and and being in the right position, I don't agree with the cookie cutter science.
The science behind it, is getting your body set up so your legs are sitting in the right position for spinning, with the right extension, they do that, then they set your bars up so that your back and arms are in a relaxed, sensible position. it's nothing complicated really.
Biomechanics is a serious science, I don't think cookie cutter fit really describes a proper fitting of a bike.
Obviously they can be done that way, but that's what I'd call a bad fitting.
 

 

 

I remember a couple years ago seeing the science lab fitting Lance Armstrong. They were using special equipment to get the wind drag down in very small increments. There was even a slight difference in hand or arm position that they were able to calculate the air drag effects over an entire race.

 

For me at my age. I just want to be comfy and have fun. It's nice to be efficient and fast too.

 

 

I just saw a strange photo ( from the eighties) of the Tour de France where they took the front rider and flipped his bars up so the rest of the team could draft behind. lol

post #2734 of 3475

Heads up for tubeless tire owners.  I saw these really cool American Classic tubeless stems and for $15 thought they'd be a fun upgrade.  I have Campy Eurus wheels and the base of the American Classics was round and I couldn't get the tire bead to seat so finally put the old one's back in and boom they seated right away.  One of the stems snapped while I was pushing it in too.  I was a little rough on it sliding by the tire bead but not crazy.  Probably great for a MTB tubeless but unless the rim is a bit wider you'll run into trouble.

 

post #2735 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post
 

937049

 

My new repair stand - Feedback Sports "Sprint" model. Free rotate 360* or locked position:

 

http://feedbacksports.com/shop/Sprint-Work-Stand-P74.aspx

Your bike made my private parts feel funny.

post #2736 of 3475

:dt880smile:

post #2737 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0str3ss View Post
 

Your bike made my private parts feel funny.

My new bike cost as much as the stand only.

post #2738 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

My new bike cost as much as the stand only.

I think something something just exploded downthere.

post #2739 of 3475

During the shoot, all the neighbors kept passing by looking :biggrin:puzzled...

post #2740 of 3475

How can you have two possible have 2 of the most expensive hobbies there are. It's mind boggling to a student that has two do a effort of a life to get some 300$ iems. But I sure like to see some multi-thousand dollar bikes.

 

I am planning to get a road one two, but used tho. I am still in the surface of my research to get a non btt bike.

post #2741 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by n0str3ss View Post
 

How can you have two possible have 2 of the most expensive hobbies there are. It's mind boggling to a student that has two do a effort of a life to get some 300$ iems. But I sure like to see some multi-thousand dollar bikes.

 

I am planning to get a road one two, but used tho. I am still in the surface of my research to get a non btt bike.

 

A vintage lugged road bicycle is where it's at. Especially if you're pulling for money.

post #2742 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by treal512 View Post

 

A vintage lugged road bicycle is where it's at. Especially if you're pulling for money.

 

I'm still pushing riding a custom built 1988 Schwinn Prologue :normal_smile :

post #2743 of 3475

Where I live you can get really nice used bikes for 1000$, I am currently pointing at that price range.

post #2744 of 3475

For me, cycling is so much fun - and has the benefit of travel, scenery and friendship - I never worry about what I don't have. A nicer bike, car, audio gears... nuthin'. I enjoy living in the moment and make what I do have, do what they do. And right now that ain't too bad. On a given Thursday, I could be found riding along the Pacific Ocean. Then Saturday, on a World class indoor Olympic track with Siberian Pine hardwood.

 

Trust me, if I rode a $50 bike along the beach, I'd still be smiling...

post #2745 of 3475

I like to ride long distances and with a iron bike with thick tires a do way less distance than what I want to do.

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