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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 141

post #2101 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by treal512 View Post

 

When I use my rear brake on slick roads, dirt, or gravel, my rear wheel skids quite a bit. This happens when I countersteer my body to the left (bike to the right) and hit the rear brake, which makes the rear end slide to the left. It looks similar to this:

 

 

Scary dangerous!

Oh, okay, you made it seem like it happens just about every time you touch it when on a normal road or bike path.  Ya, its happened to me while on dirt, didn't realize it correlated with me pulling the back brake but usually im very slow and cautious when on dirt so it isn't too scary. By the way is that on a fixie or multiple geared with disc/rim brakes?

 

I have another question to ask.  The bike community is massive, much bigger than the audiophile community.  So why is information in the biking world, and reviews missing or very hard to find on the internet? I can't find any multi item review/comparisons comparing road tires, or tubes, or chains, or just about every item every biker has purchased. Its hard to decide what products to buy, and a lot of it is probably because everyone is buying from their LBS.  But, my LBS for instance only carries Bontrager tubes and tires, which i can't really find any solid reviews of online. How do i know my tubes or tires are going to have good price to performance ratio. I've tried going around bike forums, but i haven't them them generally being much help.

 

Edit: Oh, and that GIF is super cool haha.

post #2102 of 3525

Road Bike Sites:

http://www.roadbikereview.com/

http://road.cc/

 

Bike News:

www.bikerumor.com

 

Mountain Biking:

www.mtbr.com

www.pinkbike.com

www.vitalmtb.com

singletrackworld.com

 

I'm a mountain biker so more MTB sites tongue_smile.gif

post #2103 of 3525

Nice!

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

 

 

 

"Liiike a glove"  Ace Ventura

 

 

 

 

Here's hoping my singlespeed will be completed in the next couple of weeks.

 

post #2104 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamerzhell View Post


Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

> What I'm reading in your post is you haven't fully developed your braking skills, but are misinterpreting that as a general limitation of the equipment, which is not true.

 

From the master himself: http://sheldonbrown.com/brakturn.html

 

 

 

 

I don't agree with some of the stuff he's saying, although I do believe his message is watered down for the lowest common denominator. You have to smile at him sometimes, because he'd definitely take a flyer out to left field if it helped to prove his point.

post #2105 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by customcoco View Post

Hi everyone,

 

What do you think of belt-driven bikes?

 I don't like. Nothing wrong with chains been working since the year dot and will be around for ever. easy to repair while out. easy to carry spare links.

post #2106 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by tintin40 View Post

 I don't like. Nothing wrong with chains been working since the year dot and will be around for ever. easy to repair while out. easy to carry spare links.

I guess that it depends on what you mean by "chain", standard dérailleur or I.G.H...
post #2107 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

"Liiike a glove"  Ace Ventura

 

Exactly! I had to look the scene up though. It's been a while biggrin.gif

post #2108 of 3525

I'll have to hunt one of these down once my headphone buying spree has ended

1987 Kirk Precision, a magnesium framed bike. Nothing says cool like a highly flammable/reactive frame :D

post #2109 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nixon View Post

I'll have to hunt one of these down once my headphone buying spree has ended
 

1987 Kirk Precision, a magnesium framed bike. Nothing says cool like a highly flammable/reactive frame :D


Magnesium is fairly reactive as a metal. if you put it in strong acid, it slowly makes some gas, and some salt. but it's not that interesting... it holds 12 year olds attention for about 10 seconds..
And it does burn very well... once you get it going. it's not highly flammable though. you need a decent bunsen to light a small ribbon. lighting a frame like that would be pretty difficult really...
Volkswagen make engine components out of the stuff.... a metal block designed to contain explosions, made of magnesium...
it's just metal really.
/rant over
I just don't like when people get all excited over different metals, making them out to be amazing, they're all pretty boring really.


Edited by PleasantNoise - 12/18/12 at 1:46pm
post #2110 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post

Volts Wagon
 

 

Volts Wagon?

....

Volkswagen

post #2111 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nixon View Post

I'll have to hunt one of these down once my headphone buying spree has ended

1987 Kirk Precision, a magnesium framed bike. Nothing says cool like a highly flammable/reactive frame :D

Nice find. If your interested in vintage bikes then visit here 

 

www.retrobike.co.uk

 

 

post #2112 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by leftnose View Post

 

Volts Wagon?

....

Volkswagen

 

I think it was meant as a pun, referring to the awful electrical systems on volks.

 

When magnesium is used to create mechanical components, it's not left bare metal. Just like aluminum, the last step is to create a layer of oxide on the whole part. This creates a hard, inert shell that protects the metal. You'd need to scrape off the paint and grind the oxide layer off before you can see reaction to the magnesium. And even then, a new oxide layer will create itself in the scratch.

post #2113 of 3525

How is that frame made?  It looks like it was just CNC'd from one big chunk of magnesium but that seems a little crazy.

post #2114 of 3525

I believe Serotta and Zinn both make Magnesium frames.

post #2115 of 3525
Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

 

I think it was meant as a pun, referring to the awful electrical systems on volks.

 

When magnesium is used to create mechanical components, it's not left bare metal. Just like aluminum, the last step is to create a layer of oxide on the whole part. This creates a hard, inert shell that protects the metal. You'd need to scrape off the paint and grind the oxide layer off before you can see reaction to the magnesium. And even then, a new oxide layer will create itself in the scratch.

that's not a production step really is it? seeing as the metal does it on it's own when exposed to air.

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