New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bicycle-Fi! - Page 134

post #1996 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

 Obviously a rigid mountain bike with touring tires won't be as quick and smooth as a carbon road bike, but unless you are commuting long distances or racing then you are better off getting a bike that can stand up to the abuse of commuting. 

That's what I thought too.

 

So here's what we have :

 

A rigid frame

 

Front and rear disc brakes

 

Single speed (If I ever want to change that I'll be able to, so why not try something new?)

 

 

About the frame : do you think that, within my tight budget, I should go for a front suspension or a rigid fork? 

 

Thanks

post #1997 of 3472

In your budget you won't be able to really get anything that is worth the money so I would go for the rigid and then maybe in the future you could make the move to front suspension but you won't really need it if you are not riding trails.  Another thing to think about is if the bike is going to be locked up outside a lot then you might be better off with a rigid fork so you can run bolt on thru axles rather then quick release, this would mean that you would have to carry a wrench with you to take the wheels off if you were to ever get a flat, but most thick touring tires like the continental gatorskins would be unlikely to get flats.  The upside to bolt on axles is that the chances of someone steeling your wheels is much lower as it takes far to long to get them off, this is why I ride a fixed gear as most people won't bother to steal it because of the difficulty to ride it and everything is bolted on and I use bolts that look like something you would use allen keys with but only have five sides so I dont have to lock my wheels to my frame or take my seat with me.

post #1998 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by customcoco View Post

That's what I thought too.

 

So here's what we have :

 

A rigid frame

 

Front and rear disc brakes

 

Single speed (If I ever want to change that I'll be able to, so why not try something new?)

 

 

About the frame : do you think that, within my tight budget, I should go for a front suspension or a rigid fork? 

 

Thanks

How about something like these:

 

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=80998

 

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=84760

 

http://www.bikeradar.com/gear/category/bikes/urban/product/review-vitus-vee-1-29-13-46662

post #1999 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackmarket View Post


i (used to) ride my hardtail DJ mtb on the street all the time and it was completely fine. I use 2inch XC tires at 50psi. chromoly steel frames are pretty flexy. I've honestly never experienced this jumping back and forth you speak of with disc brakes. I use hydro's and my fork hardly even sags. Honestly you don't need a specially super rigid for disc brakes; they aren't THAT powerful, unless your fork is really just that weak that it bends everytime you brake, which i've honestly never seen happen. Fork flex, though is pretty normal for rigids and 32's and honestly brake flex shouldn't be much of a strain on the fork. Even if it was, modulating the brake, which you should be doing anyways, should solve that completely, OR get a stronger rear brake and just use that. My bike only has a rear avid elixir on it and i can stop fine (though it IS a bit dangerous)

 

Well duh, of course you've never seen it. All forks with the mounts for disc brakes are already designed to be solid enough to handle disc brakes.

 

I was making reference to forks like this:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=69709

You won't ever see disc brakes on such forks, as they simply aren't strong enough to handle it. These forks are very flexible, especially with the bend on the fork. This acts as a damper, which makes the ride a lot more comfortable than a fork like this:

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=84760

post #2000 of 3472

 


They all look nice, thanks a lot for the links...

But as I've said before I'd prefer to build the bike by myself even though these bikes fit right in my budget and have all the options that I want.

Many thanks anyway.

 

About the frame, what do you think of this :  http://maddogcycles.com/product/surly-1-x-1-frameset-79216-1.htm

post #2001 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by customcoco View Post

About the frame, what do you think of this :  http://maddogcycles.com/product/surly-1-x-1-frameset-79216-1.htm

I don't know about this particular frame, but Surly has many loyal riders among the mountain bike community. 

 

Check out this forum for more info if you like.

MTBR is equal to Head-Fi in the mountain bike world.

http://forums.mtbr.com/

post #2002 of 3472

Don't know how i just learned of this threads existence. 

 

image2.aspx?w=500&h=500&filename=2002%20Kona%20Blast.jpg&f=Photos

This is what I'm riding right now. A 2002 Kona Blast on Avinir Streetsters. I switch back to the mountain tires when my friends want to go on trails, but the road tires are a huge improvement from the mountain tires. 

But once my wallet stops leaking all my money away I'll be getting my vintage Nishiki 10 speed back into riding shape. 

post #2003 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by customcoco View Post

But as I've said before I'd prefer to build the bike by myself even though these bikes fit right in my budget and have all the options that I want.

Many thanks anyway.

 

About the frame, what do you think of this :  http://maddogcycles.com/product/surly-1-x-1-frameset-79216-1.htm

 

 

Great choice. IMO Mountain bikes make the best commuters, for those who don't want to got the road bike route. The thing about the Surly for those on a budget, is its equipped for both discs and v-brakes. Cheap disc systems suck, so it allows for future upgrades if desired.

post #2004 of 3472
duh

Edited by pigmode - 11/3/12 at 3:54pm
post #2005 of 3472

My vote would be for the surly and was what I was going to recommend for you, as pigmode said you can rune either type of brakes although if I was building a commuter bike I would get a set of Avid BB5 disc brakes as they are cheap but work AMAZINGLY, I used to use a set on my mountain bike that were almost ten years old, but they still work perfectly to this day.  The reason I replaced them was to get some hydraulic brakes that had more stopping power and self adjusting pads, but as far as disc brakes go the BB5s are the best brakes you can buy and would be perfect for a commuter bike and disc brakes are definitely worth it over rim brakes as the stopping power cannot be compared.  My father use to have a pair of avid rim brakes that are top of the line and probably the best rim brakes I have ever tried and he use to rave about them.  Then I let him try my Avid BB5s after I got some new brakes and he immediately dropped the new rim brakes for the BB5s despite the BB5s costing a third of the price the Avid rim brakes did.  Even a cheap pair of disc brakes will be far better than the best rim brakes especially when wet and you don't ruin your rims with disc brakes.

post #2006 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

My vote would be for the surly and was what I was going to recommend for you, as pigmode said you can rune either type of brakes although if I was building a commuter bike I would get a set of Avid BB5 disc brakes as they are cheap but work AMAZINGLY, I used to use a set on my mountain bike that were almost ten years old, but they still work perfectly to this day.  The reason I replaced them was to get some hydraulic brakes that had more stopping power and self adjusting pads, but as far as disc brakes go the BB5s are the best brakes you can buy and would be perfect for a commuter bike and disc brakes are definitely worth it over rim brakes as the stopping power cannot be compared.  My father use to have a pair of avid rim brakes that are top of the line and probably the best rim brakes I have ever tried and he use to rave about them.  Then I let him try my Avid BB5s after I got some new brakes and he immediately dropped the new rim brakes for the BB5s despite the BB5s costing a third of the price the Avid rim brakes did.  Even a cheap pair of disc brakes will be far better than the best rim brakes especially when wet and you don't ruin your rims with disc brakes.

 

Thanks, I've read a lot of great things about those brakes. And they're pretty cheap. what levers do you use?

 

The only things left to figure out are the wheels and the drive-train plus the usual "accessories" like saddle, handlebars etc...

 

I'm not sure yet about the tires.. it's getting pretty rainy around here so road tires like continental's sport contact aren't a safe bet anymore.

post #2007 of 3472

When I used the BB5s I used these levers: http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/16814-035_AVDD78-3-Parts-911-Brakes/Rim/Avid-Speed-Dial-7-Brake-Levers-2012.htm

They are really nice levers and the weight of them is more than reasonable, try to stay away from the all in one shifter/brake lever combos as you will eventually have to replace them when you want to upgrade something so it just makes it cheaper to get separate units.

 

As for the other parts here is a few suggestions:

http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/13964-270_WTBPV5-3-Parts-67-Saddles/WTB-Pure-V-Race-Saddle.htm  This seat is super comfortable especially for climbing as the nose is angled down so you can sit more forward, this version is the cheaper version with the synthetic leather, but you can get it in the real leather version which is what I have.  The leather one feels a bit better but you have to put shoe polish on it to keep it in good shape so it is not really worth the extra money as the synthetic one feels really good to.

 

As for the handlebars you can never go wrong with a pair of Easton monkeylite carbons and I can attest to their toughness as I have hit far to many trees with them than I car to admit, because they are carbon they will take out some of the small chatter of the road and give a smoother feel: http://www.jensonusa.com/!5lSuWlpLQMOcSW-TQ0f2cg!/Easton-EC70-Monkeylite-Carbon-Handlebar?utm_source=FRGL&utm_medium=organic&gclid=CKXX1cbjurMCFQqe4AodjWsAGQ

 

For the stem and seatpost you will have to decide what you will fit you the best as stems come in a wide range of lengths so you will need to figure out what size is comfortable and also depends on the size frame you buy.  When you are looking at the frame sizes, ignore the sizes small, medium, etc. Instead focus on the top tube length as there is no standard to frame sizes so one companies medium might be the same as another's large, to figure out what size works best you should try out a few bikes at a local bike shop to figure out the reach that is comfortable for you and as long as the frame is with in an inch + or - you can adjust it using a stem of the correct length to offset it.  For stems the best budget brand would be Race Face but if you can afford it go with Thompson as they probably make the best stems and seatposts and I doubt anyone would argue about that, not to mention they are extremely lightweight aluminum parts even by carbon standards.  For the seatposts look at easton, truvativ and crankbrothers for the budget stuff, but again if you can afford it go with the Thompson as it will last you forever.

 

For a headset you can choose to get a cheap one or you can spend some money and get a good one which I HIGHLY recommend as a good headset will outlast you while cheap ones will only last a couple of years and feel no where near as smooth.  I used to have a cheap FSA headset that always wanted to return the front wheel to center because the bearings had become worn after a few years of riding.  Chris King and Cane Creek both make the best headsets hands down and no one would argue about that, Cane Creek does make some cheaper ones so make sure you stick to the 110 series, which they back with a 110 year warranty, hence the name.  Chris King backs there's with a 10 year warranty and tend to be a little more pricey although they always outlive there warranty.  A good headset will have a huge difference over the cheap ones as they feel so much smoother and you won't even notice they are there, I have a highend Cane Creek headset on my road bike and a Chris King on my mountain bike so I have experience with both.  The Chris King does feel smoother but it was also double the price of the Cane Creek, but the Cane Creek is still incredibly smooth, I can attest to the longevity of the Cane Creeks as my dad is a huge fan and that is all he will ride and his headset has been going strong for about ten years and it still feels perfect with no signs of wear, I have only had the Chris King for a year but it is on my Yeti 575 so it sees a lot of abuse from the rocky New England trails but still feels just as good as the day I got it.

 

For pedals get Crank Brothers regardless of flats or clipless as they make the best pedals you will ever use and the egg beaters allow you to clip in no matter what kinda crap you have on the bottom of your shoe and the flat pedals are indestructible.  For tires the continental gator skins are pretty tough and should work well for you, as for tires in the rain, it is a common misconception that you can't run slicks in the rain, just look at any bike racers in the rain they will be running slicks without a problem.  Regardless of tires, I see some many new riders make common mistakes in wet weather (especially tri athletes who have the fancy time trial bikes yet know nothing about how to ride), stay off of obvious things like man hole covers and sewer grates, but it is the painted lines on the road no one expects to be slippery and I have seen many people go down because they rode on them.

 

For a crankset look at Race Face or try to find a couple year old Shimano XT as they make fantastic cranks that are very reliable and make sure it comes with a bottom bracket that will work with your bike.  The only thing I'm at a loss for is the wheels, the Surly frame will allow you to run any size wheels you want so you will have to decide what size will work best for you and you may have to lace up the wheelset yourself or have a shop do it for you which would be my reccomendation as it is a hard task although doing it your self would give you a TON of knowledge that few people have.

post #2008 of 3472
Quote:
Originally Posted by micrors4 View Post

 

 

 

For a headset you can choose to get a cheap one or you can spend some money and get a good one which I HIGHLY recommend as a good headset will outlast you while cheap ones will only last a couple of years and feel no where near as smooth.  I used to have a cheap FSA headset that always wanted to return the front wheel to center because the bearings had become worn after a few years of riding.  Chris King and Cane Creek both make the best headsets hands down and no one would argue about that, Cane Creek does make some cheaper ones so make sure you stick to the 110 series, which they back with a 110 year warranty, hence the name.  Chris King backs there's with a 10 year warranty and tend to be a little more pricey although they always outlive there warranty.  A good headset will have a huge difference over the cheap ones as they feel so much smoother and you won't even notice they are there, I have a highend Cane Creek headset on my road bike and a Chris King on my mountain bike so I have experience with both.  The Chris King does feel smoother but it was also double the price of the Cane Creek, but the Cane Creek is still incredibly smooth, I can attest to the longevity of the Cane Creeks as my dad is a huge fan and that is all he will ride and his headset has been going strong for about ten years and it still feels perfect with no signs of wear, I have only had the Chris King for a year but it is on my Yeti 575 so it sees a lot of abuse from the rocky New England trails but still feels just as good as the day I got it.

 

For pedals get Crank Brothers regardless of flats or clipless as they make the best pedals you will ever use and the egg beaters allow you to clip in no matter what kinda crap you have on the bottom of your shoe and the flat pedals are indestructible.  For tires the continental gator skins are pretty tough and should work well for you, as for tires in the rain, it is a common misconception that you can't run slicks in the rain, just look at any bike racers in the rain they will be running slicks without a problem.  Regardless of tires, I see some many new riders make common mistakes in wet weather (especially tri athletes who have the fancy time trial bikes yet know nothing about how to ride), stay off of obvious things like man hole covers and sewer grates, but it is the painted lines on the road no one expects to be slippery and I have seen many people go down because they rode on them.

 

For a crankset look at Race Face or try to find a couple year old Shimano XT as they make fantastic cranks that are very reliable and make sure it comes with a bottom bracket that will work with your bike.  The only thing I'm at a loss for is the wheels, the Surly frame will allow you to run any size wheels you want so you will have to decide what size will work best for you and you may have to lace up the wheelset yourself or have a shop do it for you which would be my reccomendation as it is a hard task although doing it your self would give you a TON of knowledge that few people have.

 

Thanks for your advices.

 

For the headset I think I'll go with the cane creek, they are really less expensive where I live.

 

About the pedals: I'll buy the crankbros mallet (not sure about the version), because I can use them with sneakers while still having the possibility to clip.

 

What do you think about these cranksets ?

 

http://www.wiggle.fr/pedalier-alfine-shimano-avec-garde-chaine/

 

http://www.wiggle.fr/pedalier-cinelli-bianca-a-vitesse-unique/

 

thanks again everyone. beerchug.gif

post #2009 of 3472

The Shimano crank is more for comfort bikes rather than a mountain bike so they won't stand up to the abuse as well, as for the other one I have never heard of them so can't really comment on it. You don't have to limit yourself to a crank made purely for a single speed either like the ones you linked to, for your standard three chain ring crank you can just remove the outer most ring and replace it with a bash guard then remove the inner most ring so you are only left with the middle one.  I have always been a fan of Shimano cranks and have been clinging to my XT one now for now because you can't get them in the style I have anymore unfortunately, for a crank you would be better off with this one:

 

http://www.wiggle.fr/pedalier-triple-shimano-fc-m590-deore-9-vitesses-44322-dents/

 

The prices on parts in France seem to be marked up pretty high, the crank above can be had for $50 in the US, about half the price if you convert currency.  Seeing as you are ordering a lot of parts it might be worth ordering through a site like this: http://www.cambriabike.com/    which ships internationally, but shipping is on the high side so unless you are ordering a lot it doesn't really make sense.

post #2010 of 3472

If you live in France, bike parts prices are cheaper in this site:

 

http://www.alltricks.fr/vtt/pedaliers-boitiers/pedaliers-manivelles-9v/shimano-pedalier-complet-deore-9v-hollowtech-ii-fc-m590-223244-175mm-boitier-310-1173.html

 

They also have a store in St. Quentin-en-Yvelines where you can directly buy them. Excellent customer service and the store staff are very knowledgeable and helpful.

But I'd also advice you to get a one ring crank for a single speed bike. I don't know much about the road bike parts but  Raceface Face is a MTB brand which is a bit expensive but light weight & highly durable.

 

The new 2013 Shimano Zee is also a good crankset.

http://www.probikeshop.fr/shimano-pedalier-zee-36-dents-fc-m64/80199.html

 

Check your frame's bottom bracket type first before buying a crankset.

Hope this helps!

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home