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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 131

post #1951 of 3448

Would it be out of place in this thread to offer the observation that having ridden bicycles enthusiastically for over fifty years that I am now really loving the switch to a recumbent trike? No pain, heads up riding position, stop on any hill no matter how steep and restart again without any trouble, absolutely incredible downhill thrills letting it rip?

 

Thanks,

 

Steve Z

post #1952 of 3448

Not out of place. Although I might be one to snicker at perfectly healthy with no physical limitations, bearded ex-hippy types still bucking the system riding their recumbents, yours is a different situation. Keep pedaling, man--I'm also approaching the age of 60.

post #1953 of 3448

Hey, I'm curious how people warm up for rides?
I take a good 30 minutes to properly warm up when I play badminton.
When I ride I tend to take the first 30 minutes slower, and easier than the rest of the ride, but I'm not sure it's the best way to warm up
(I live on a hill, connected to a hill in either direction, so I can't warm up gently on the flat)

post #1954 of 3448

What you could do is exercise off the bike. One that comes to mind is to lie flat on your back and raise your knees back and pedal in place, in the air. Graeme Obree "The Flying Scotsman" was always seen doing this exercise as a warmup/workout.

post #1955 of 3448

I usually warm up on my bike. When I'm warmed up, I get off and do some stretching. It usually makes the rest of the ride more comfortable.

 

Besides, if you're like me and you enjoy going farther and visit new places, wasting energy warming up before getting on the bike just sounds silly. biggrin.gif

post #1956 of 3448

Sometimes I think it takes me about 15mi to warm up properly. Before that muscles feel overstressed for a given effort, and flexibility is not all there. On one of my rides there are three hills starting 2min out of the front door, before climbing the mountain pass to the other side of the island. Its one of my best rides, but am not a fan of having to climb so early.

 

In the 90's I ran into (and joined for a little while) Tinker Juarez while climbing up a favorite Honolulu climb. It was race day and he was doing his  warm up. The race course was about a 65mi round trip.

post #1957 of 3448
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent One View Post

What you could do is exercise off the bike. One that comes to mind is to lie flat on your back and raise your knees back and pedal in place, in the air. Graeme Obree "The Flying Scotsman" was always seen doing this exercise as a warmup/workout.


Sounds like a nice idea, I'll give it a go :]
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KimLaroux View Post

I usually warm up on my bike. When I'm warmed up, I get off and do some stretching. It usually makes the rest of the ride more comfortable.

 

Besides, if you're like me and you enjoy going farther and visit new places, wasting energy warming up before getting on the bike just sounds silly. biggrin.gif


That's what I've been doing, but it doesn't feel Ideal to me...

post #1958 of 3448

Not been on HF in a long time. Thought I'd share pics of my bike which I finally received in August.smile.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

post #1959 of 3448

Very nice!!

post #1960 of 3448

My goodness, shamrock134! Thanks for the afternoon inspiration.

beerchug.gif

post #1961 of 3448
Quote:
Originally Posted by shamrock134 View Post

Not been on HF in a long time. Thought I'd share pics of my bike which I finally received in August.smile.gif

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have something in common (more later).

post #1962 of 3448

Have my hand in too many pots again. This will hopefully become my singlespeed city commuter.

 

 

post #1963 of 3448

Whoa!  Nice!

post #1964 of 3448
Quote:
Tim Isaac of Match Cycles, built the 60th Anniversary Paramount in 1998 for Schwinn. The Isaac Paramounts were fantastic Reynolds 853 frames. The Isaac Paramount program lasted until 2000. Among the names who worked at Isaac were Steve Hampsten (Andy's brother), Kirk Pacenti and Curt Goodrich, who was the Master Frame Builder for Issac. Goodrich was the guy who put the flame to metal and brought Isaac's Paramounts to life. While Issac was building the 60th Anniversary bikes. Schwinn had Ben Serotta build titanium Paramounts with the same color scheme as the 60th

 

 

Its description. Not sure where I'm going with this but if the Peg gets sent out for refinish and head tube shortening, it can be built up as a road bike. 

post #1965 of 3448

Hi everyone,

 

What do you think of belt-driven bikes?

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