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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 130

post #1936 of 3475

@ pigmode

Dude is that Hawaii? It is so beautiful!!

post #1937 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

The way up, or fear of concrete roads IMG_0136

The Top IMG_0150 IMG_0147 Another day, another hill DH_Wiliwilinui DH_Laukahi Whoa, should have seen it on the way up Cobbles

What a bummer you have to ride in such conditions!  smile.gif

post #1938 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post

Finally worked out how to cycle at a higher cadence for longer periods...
61.3km, 2 hours 20 minutes...
I'm wanting to work up to a metric century, and then a 'proper' century, but damn, 60km is hard work.
How do you guys ride your centuries? Do you ride them solo or in groups?
What kind of pace do you aim for?

 

A metric you can do by yourself and it's pretty easy. A regular century I recommend going to an event. It's hard to carry enough food/water/tools on yourself for ~6 of riding and with the events you get regular supplied rest stops and on-course support if you need something on your bike fixed. Plus you get the safety of riding on a marked course with other people, and when you finish there's a big party! Once you're more used to them and get your time down then you can do it by yourself and start working for double metric and double century!

post #1939 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocswing View Post

 

A metric you can do by yourself and it's pretty easy. A regular century I recommend going to an event. It's hard to carry enough food/water/tools on yourself for ~6 of riding and with the events you get regular supplied rest stops and on-course support if you need something on your bike fixed. Plus you get the safety of riding on a marked course with other people, and when you finish there's a big party! Once you're more used to them and get your time down then you can do it by yourself and start working for double metric and double century!


And my friends this that 60km is nuts, let alone 200, or 320 km
you people are crazy! (in a good way, I'd love to do that kind of distance)

post #1940 of 3475

Although I have not myself done a century (because I haven't had the time to figure out a route), I say from experience that circa 120km by yourself with a 2kg bicycle lock + the usual necessities is fine. Another 40km wouldn't have killed me. I was using a backpack and riding a triathlon bike. It was a relatively flat route with a 300+metre climb. 

 

Also, I have done about 100km with 40pounds of weight, of which 20 were on my back, again on that damn triathlon bike. This was far more difficult with about 1100metres of climbing. If it were flatter, a century would've been quite possible. 

 

Note to self, cycle touring and camping with a race bike is not ideal, but it's possible. 

 

However, for your first century, make it special, do an event or with a group of friends, it's more fun that way. 

post #1941 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by silwen View Post

 

However, for your first century, make it special, do an event or with a group of friends, it's more fun that way. 


I don't have a group of friends who cycle.... and I like to ride alone anyway....

post #1942 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by PleasantNoise View Post

Finally worked out how to cycle at a higher cadence for longer periods...
61.3km, 2 hours 20 minutes...
I'm wanting to work up to a metric century, and then a 'proper' century, but damn, 60km is hard work.
How do you guys ride your centuries? Do you ride them solo or in groups?
What kind of pace do you aim for?

 

 

 

Except for a 2-3 yr false start in '05, injuries have prevented me for cycling for over 15 yr. I started the long journey to recovery 3 years ago, and never thought I would climb another hill again, and that would have been okay actually.

 

My first rides were 4 mi in length, on bike paths and sidewalks. My first 15/20/30 mi rides required 1-2 week rest and recovery periods, and there were other times where recovery periods were needed. The first year I iced both knees in the morning and evening, and sometimes after rides as well. 

 

Basically you start at the starting point and continue increasing your limits until you reach your goal.

 

IMO mastering the biomechanics of cycling, and becoming a good technical cyclist in that sense has more than a lot to say for itself. Its the basic stepping stone to moving up from the hobby level.

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by bravo4588 View Post

@ pigmode

Dude is that Hawaii? It is so beautiful!!

 

 

 

Honolulu, Hawaii. Its pretty despoiled from when I was a kid, but still cool where you can find it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Icenine2 View Post
What a bummer you have to ride in such conditions!  smile.gif
 
 
I fogot about those pictures. Need to climb some more hills. :)

Edited by pigmode - 9/12/12 at 12:28pm
post #1943 of 3475

Yesterdays climbs with various shots of Diamond Head. Halekoa Drive is considered the second hardest climb on Oahu, with a max gradient of 19%. The next climb, Waahila Ridge, is supposed to include the steepest grade on Oahu at 24%+. My first time since '95.

 

 

Halekoa with DH way in the back.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edited by pigmode - 9/20/12 at 12:08pm
post #1944 of 3475

Awesome!!!

post #1945 of 3475

Icenine, I'll be refreshing the Pegoretti in the first 2 weeks of Oct. Will update.

post #1946 of 3475

Very nice...and your shots continue to inspire. I'm closer totongue_smile.gifgetting back off the couch now.

post #1947 of 3475
post #1948 of 3475

 

Thanks:thumb:for making sure we get only the best! Question: What's the black item attached to the rear part of your frame (lower right) in the foreground? Sensor for revolutions?

 

 

440fe622_alohaCapture-Copy.jpeg


Edited by Silent One - 9/20/12 at 2:45pm
post #1949 of 3475
Its a Garmin cadence/speed sensor.
post #1950 of 3475
Quote:
Originally Posted by pigmode View Post

Icenine, I'll be refreshing the Pegoretti in the first 2 weeks of Oct. Will update.

Yes!

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