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Bicycle-Fi! - Page 9

post #121 of 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by ronin74 View Post
The beauty of track bikes (fixies) is the lack of weight, it's like peddling nothing.

M11a, how much does your bike weigh? BTW you need more yellow, yellow carbon/aero spoke (radial pattern), yellow alloy nipples, yellow crank-set, and a decent water-bottle.
I just weighted it without a bottle, it's 15.8 pounds, full steel too.

I would totally invest more into my bike but it's too damn expensive. yellow wheels (Aerospoke) would cost about 800 for a set. No company makes crank-set but I am going to get a black crank-set instead since my color scheme is bi-colored (black and yellow). What's wrong with my bottle cage? Hehe....
post #122 of 3449
Since the Australian dollar has plummeted 10% that has increased the cost of sleek sa6 10% so I'm just gonna wait till it goes back up.
In the meantime someone recommend me a starter bike for 200-300 $450 is the going rate for the Giant OCR3 but I just want a basic road bike.

Is this decent for $220?
EUREKA 1000 - FULL SHIMANO POWERED ROAD BIKE RACER - eBay Complete Bikes, Road Bikes, Parts, Cycling, Sport. (end time 14-Aug-08 19:00:00 AEST)
Seems to be the going rate.
Thanks
Steve
post #123 of 3449
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2162 View Post
Is this decent for $220?
First thing, would it fit you? I'm 5'9" and ride a 54-55cm road frame in most geometries. That's a 51cm.
post #124 of 3449
I thought i'd post this here -concept bike from BMW and Specialized
BMW Taras Silenko - BMW Bicycles
post #125 of 3449
Don't do it. The frames are of the cheapest quality, and some of the parts are no-name. Buy a re real bike like these from GVH(just one place that comes to mind).

Complete Bicycle Special!!!

Any of the frames listed below with this kit:

SRAM Rival group

Fulcrum Racing 7 wheels

Michelin tires

Fizik Aliante saddle


KHS Flite 700 red: 56, 58, 60 $1200
KHS Flite 800 burgundy: 56, 58, 60 $1300
Soma Smoothie green: 54, 56, 58, 60cm $1300
Ridley Triton silver: 52, 53, 54 ,57, 59
white: 52, 53, 55, 56, 57
$1400
Viner Comp blue: 46, 50, 52
red: 45, 46, 47, 49, 50, 51, 53
$1400
Gary V steel, red: 52, 56(traveller)

titanium: 55(aero), 57
$1500
Viner Nemo standard: red: 50, 53

sloping: red: S, M, XL
$1600
Torelli Toccata black: 48, 54, 60

red: 53, 56, 60

yellow: 53, 56, 60
$1700
post #126 of 3449
Thread Starter 
post #127 of 3449
I'm picking this goldmine up after work today:

post #128 of 3449
Thread Starter 
That looks like a lot of fun. Lots of neat little elegant parts. Good bikes are almost as much fun to work on as ride.
post #129 of 3449
Yeah, for me is just as much about building something as it is being able to use it for transportation.

There's a real satisfaction in knowing what's under you as you fly down a hill at 50mph.
post #130 of 3449
I have a Klein Mantra Comp:


It's the last year they built them, 2003. I ditched most of the stock parts, and went all XTR (replaced LX brakes, rear derailleur, shifters, brake levers), Selle San Marco Aspide racing saddle, Easton Monkey Light carbon handlebars, Thompson stem, Marzocchi Marathon air front fork, SRAM 9 spd racing chain, and teflon coated cables, Ti skewers, Eggbeater pedals, King headset, Panaracer Fire XC tires and ultralight tubes (plus a few other things here and there). Took that beast down from almost 34 pounds to about 26.5. This bike is built like a tank, but is so responsive it's almost TOO twitchy...it feels like a road bike more than a mountain goat, lol...

Funny thing is right after I got done with upgradeitis, I cleaned, lubed, and adjusted everything, and then stopped riding. This was four years ago, lol...it's just been gathering dust, but I just quit smoking and need to get back in shape, so last weekend I busted it out, cleaned it again, retuned, adjusted the shocks to compensate for my 20-odd pound weight gain, and plan to go for a spin this week. *sigh*...
post #131 of 3449
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRobbStory View Post
There's a real satisfaction in knowing what's under you as you fly down a hill at 50mph.
Or, alternatively, that what's working between you and the pavement is going to continue working between you and the pavement.
post #132 of 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRobbStory View Post
I'm picking this goldmine up after work today:

Delta Brakes! I have not seen them in a while. I used to owned them w/ a C-Record Group including Syncro back in 1989. They were installed on my Kestrel bike. The delta brakes are gorgeous and you need to use to feathering braking versus the more powerful brakes of the time.

In hindsight I preferred the Modolo brakes w/ their sinterized pads. Boy, am I showing my age or what!
post #133 of 3449
I'm thinking about getting a bike to keep in the trailer behind my motorhome. It would be used in a number of different situations, from road to trail, but not heavy off-road stuff. I'll be 46 next month, and overweight and out of shape. So speed isn't a key factor. It's just for exercise. Cost is, however.

The bike that I have in Cayman suits me fine. It's a Specialized Crossroads. I bought it a couple of years ago, but sadly, haven't used it much (and thus the overweight and out of shape thing).

So today I went to the local bike store in Idaho Falls where I've been hanging out of late. They didn't have the exact model, but I could get a Specialized Expedition Elite for $470, which is the MSRP per the Specialized website. It would fit the bill, and I'll probably go that direction.

But while I was there, I test rode a couple of recumbent bikes from Rans Bikes (out of Hays, KS, which is kind of cool if you like supporting the small towners like I do). Check out their website:

RANS Recumbent Bike Gallery

It would take a bit of time to get used to, but they provide a pretty smooth ride and don't stress the back, neck, wrists, or the all important prostate nearly as much as conventional bikes do. Yet, the one I liked best was actually the most conventional design. It's called a "crank forward" bike rather than a recumbant. The model name was Dnyamik. See here: crankforward

Anyway, I loved the ride and feel that I'll probably use it more than the Specialized bike I had in mind going into the store. Of course, we're talking more like $1,500 than under $500.

I'll have to give it some thought. Anyone have experience with these kinds of bikes?
post #134 of 3449
Trikkes are even lower stress on the joints than any bike, recumbent or not. If you're going for a commute, consider recumbent, it you want exercise, consider the Trikke. It's truly a full body workout. Excellent for your upper body and core in addition to the legs. I lost 10lbs in the first week. My wife was ticked because she only lost one lb.
post #135 of 3449
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwkarth View Post
Trikkes are even lower stress on the joints than any bike, recumbent or not. If you're going for a commute, consider recumbent, it you want exercise, consider the Trikke. It's truly a full body workout. Excellent for your upper body and core in addition to the legs. I lost 10lbs in the first week. My wife was ticked because she only lost one lb.
I think I'll get a Trikke and a Bikke...

No, seriously, a Trikke would be great exercise and a lot of fun to have in the trailer for general purposes. On track days especially, you always need a way to get around. Lots of people keep golf carts or mini bikes in their trailers for that purpose. Plus, it would be a blast to have when I've got other people on board, whether at a KOA or a national park, or just to jet across the parking lot at WalMart (great place to overnight for free in a motorhome, BTW... at least when you don't need to be running your generator).

I'm going to take a quick trip out to Jackson Hole, WY, tomorrow and make a decision about the bike. The Rans dealer there also carries Specialized so there will be lots of choices. The nearest Trikke dealer is in Salt Lake City so that will have to wait for another day.
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