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The album that changed ... - Page 4

post #46 of 131
Quote:
Originally posted by Iron_Dreamer
Judas Priest - Turbo

Yes, it was the attemped sell-out wanna-be hair-metal career nadir of these metal pioneers that actually made me get really interested in music, to the point where it became a major part of my life. The title track was the first I'd ever heard Halford, and I remain hooked on his voice to this very day.

I would also mention Dream Theater - Images and Words, which I bought after reading favorable opnions on some random metal site, and it really opened my ears to the possiblites of more complex music, as well as the sheer beauty that music makes possible.
boy I really wanted to like TURBO. I did for a year maybe, then I kind of lost interest in it. I don't even go back to DEFENDERS as much as I used to, maybe I got burned out on it. The ones I go back to more often are POINT OF ENTRY, SIN AFTER SIN and STAINED CLASS.

-jar
post #47 of 131
One night, when I was in junior high, me and my friends were down at the beach grunion hunting. Grunions are small fish that, believe it or not, wiggle up onto the wet sand on the night or a full moon to lay their eggs. Hard to believe, huh? Anyway, I didn't want to leave you guys confused.

Anyway, I was in my mom's car taking a break and all of a sudden, Bob Dylan's Like a Rolling Stone came on. It was a transforming experience for me. Didn't join my friends on the beach the rest of the night...just waited for the song to play again.
post #48 of 131
Smashing Pumpkins - Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, and Machina
post #49 of 131
Nirvana - Nevermind
post #50 of 131
1967, the seminal year in Rock. This was the famous Summer of Love in San Francisco and the Monterey International Pop Festival.

There were quite a few landmark albums released that year including some that forever changed people's perception of what popular music was meant to be:

The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Jefferson Airplane - Surrealistic Pillow
The Doors - The Doors

From the liner notes of Weird Scenes Inside The Gold Mine (a 2-LP Doors collection) - "After listening to The Doors, sitting down to dinner with your parents wasn't the same anymore."
post #51 of 131
Real rip roaring rage to match my own, and an expulsion from school!

post #52 of 131
Brahms' Clarinet Quintet (Budapest Qt with Oppenheim on Columbia)

An anthology of Charlie Parker stuff on Pickwick
post #53 of 131
Quote:
Originally posted by daycart1
[B]Brahms' Clarinet Quintet (Budapest Qt with Oppenheim on Columbia)B]
HOW? (Just idle curiousity,I have some interest in Brahms)
post #54 of 131
[QUOTE]Originally posted by eyeteeth
Real rip roaring rage to match my own, and an expulsion from school!

Go eyeteeth!!

I was there in 1976 (freshman in college) when that album broke. What a life changer is right! What a change in music it wrought!
post #55 of 131
[QUOTE]Originally posted by chadbang
Quote:
Originally posted by eyeteeth
Real rip roaring rage to match my own, and an expulsion from school!

Go eyeteeth!!

I was there in 1976 (freshman in college) when that album broke. What a life changer is right! What a change in music it wrought!
Revelation I felt as if I was mankind and had discovered both Fire & Sex on the same day! The Venom within me had found a voice! Of course you had to be a messed up kid & hear it when it was new. AHH, the Good old Bad Days
post #56 of 131
Quote:
Originally posted by eyeteeth
HOW? (Just idle curiousity,I have some interest in Brahms)
My mom played it a lot when I was a little tyke. Got my own when I went to college.
post #57 of 131
Quote:
Originally posted by daycart1
My mom played it a lot when I was a little tyke.
The free flexible 45rpm's cut square that came in the mail as advertisments to purchase Tchaikovsky or Beethoven had an affect upon me. I listened to them over & over. I was about 8 years old.
post #58 of 131
Glassworks by Philip Glass was quite influential to me -- it opened my attention to the possibilities of minimalism.
post #59 of 131
husker du -- zen arcade
- for how it changed me as a person

tom waits -- swordfish trombones
- for how it changed the way i listen to music.

new day rising and rain dogs, respectively, probably ended up getting more play, and became my preferred albums. but these two albums were the catalysts... they transformed me.
post #60 of 131
Quote:
Originally posted by Masonjar
boy I really wanted to like TURBO. I did for a year maybe, then I kind of lost interest in it. I don't even go back to DEFENDERS as much as I used to, maybe I got burned out on it. The ones I go back to more often are POINT OF ENTRY, SIN AFTER SIN and STAINED CLASS.
-jar
It's funny, since I really don't like Turbo very much, save the title track and Reckless. I would rate it below all Priest albums, save Rocka Rolla and Demolition, but it still holds a special place for me, since it was my first. My second Preist album was Stained Class, which is still my favorite by a hair over Painkiller.
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