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post #121 of 131
the albums that perpetually stick with me, help conjure up the past and clarify the present:
Massive Attack - Protection
Smashing Pumpkins - Siamese Dream
Nirvana - Nevermind

i encountered them at interesting times in my life and thus they have a certain indelible meaning to me
post #122 of 131
Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick
-I was in tears when this albm concluded - a concept album so great in story, that it was powerful enough to make one tear come out of my right eye.

Pink Floyd - Dark Side of the Moon
-Showed me how incredibly good somebody's drumming could be by being simple - it made the drummer I am today, and made me listen to the music I do today

Nirvana - In Utero/Nevermind
-These two albums opened my world to how incredibly emotional music could get - having witnessed the suicide of Kurt Cobain I started listening to his music, and it really got me thinking about how somebody's personal life can interfere with music while conversely at the same time allowing them to "succeed" - succeeding was also a questioned thought in my mind after hearing these records

The Beatles - Sgt. Pepper
-I just always aspired to come even close to the tallent, skill, and pure beauty this album produced... such incredible ability and strength in lyrics.. just wow
post #123 of 131
I'm in bussiness for quite a while...

1976: Beatles for Sale. My first record ever (was 10 then)

1982: Visage - Fade to Grey. First contact with non 70's based sound.

At about 1995: Xingu Hill - Maps of the Impossible (ebm artist from Belgium). First Contact with the sound I prefer since then.

At about 1997: Mozart's Requiem. "Reminded" me how much I love classical music.
post #124 of 131
In 1965 - Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, it's either self-titled or now available as "Impulse" (but 1st track is "Alamode"). I grew up as a serious musician and fan of big band jazz but the Blakey LP introduced me to small group, straight ahead jazz which has stuck with me my entire life (ok, so I'm older than you...) A fantastic set I still listen to.

In 1969, "It's A Beautiful Day," self-titled. This LP launched me into my flower-child years (which continue to this day, except without the drugs.)

"Thick As A Brick" - IMO best rock recording ever. Genuine tour de force.

And to whoever said "Spirit - Twelve Dreams of Dr. Sardonicus," good call!

That said, it's still all about jazz for me...
post #125 of 131
Pink Floyd -- The Wall

That album encompasses everything an album should be: Original Sound, thought provoking lyrics, identification, Amazing seamless presentation, and most importantly, pulls at EVERY single one of your emotions. Happy, Sad, Temptation, Pure Joy, Depression, Rebellion, and PRIDE.

While other Pink Floyd albums hold a special place in my heart, Dark Side of the Moon, The Final Cut, and Wish You Were Here; The Wall seems to have something extra. They all have this Opera or Ballet like presentation quality to them, but The Wall is like everything Pink Floyd was ever trying to say or do in one album. And what's more is that it's TIMELESS. I wasn't even ALIVE when The Wall came out. I didn't discover Pink Floyd until around 1999, and each message speaks just as true today as it did then. Truely a masterpiece.

Other great artists have produced similar production albums since, (Radiohead, Smashing Pumpkins, Tool, NiN, and it pains me to admit, but I can actually classify Green Day's latest into this Epic Opus production category) but I feel they all owe something to The Wall.
post #126 of 131
Joe Satriani --- Surfing with the Alien

started playing guitar when i entered Highschool, formed a band, but it was mostly hard rock. then after graduation we disbanded, didn't touch a guitar for a year or two when i was in college, then a friend lent me the CD. looked pretty cool on the cover, as it was a character i knew; Silver Surfer. it was the Melody of "Always with me, always with you", that inspired me to pick up the guitar again.
post #127 of 131
Hearing "The needle and the damage done" from Neil Young's Unplugged in a record shop.... go and ask what this is, buy the CD and leave with that joyful feeling that you had found "THE SOUND" that you were looking for, without knowing what it was before...

if that makes sense....hehehe....

Papy
post #128 of 131

Reviving a really old thread about life-changing albums because that is what's on my mind tonight.

 

For me? Stevie Ray Vaughan's Texas Flood.  Up to that point in my life, I had only briefly heard those old Blues guys with names like Pinetop and Blind Lemon whatever. That wasn't my cup of tea. But until I heard SRV, I had never heard anyone play the blues LIKE THAT.

 

SRV introduced a whole generation of stoners, rockers and head-bangers to the Blues.

 

Rest in peace Stevie. You changed my life, Brother.
 

post #129 of 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldSkool View Post

Reviving a really old thread about life-changing albums because that is what's on my mind tonight.

 

For me? Stevie Ray Vaughan's Texas Flood.  Up to that point in my life, I had only briefly heard those old Blues guys with names like Pinetop and Blind Lemon whatever. That wasn't my cup of tea. But until I heard SRV, I had never heard anyone play the blues LIKE THAT.

 

SRV introduced a whole generation of stoners, rockers and head-bangers to the Blues.

 

Rest in peace Stevie. You changed my life, Brother.
 

 

 

Cool thread ... think I'll put that SRV in the player and "revisit it" (with new equipment).   (and perhaps add something to the thread ... problem is, right now it's about 25 Jazz albums, in no particular order ... just a heap of 50's Jazz. :)


Edited by ChevyVan - 11/9/12 at 10:34pm
post #130 of 131

I'll toss in a few more, not only personally influential and mind-opening but also to this day highly tasty headphone treats:

 

Supertramp - Crime of The Century

Allman Brothers Band- Live At Fillmore East (my avatar)

Pink Floyd - Wish You Were Here

Dire Straits - Dire Straits

Miles Davis - Kind of Blue / Dave Brubeck - Take Five (the beginning of a journey, the 'laced candy' so to speak)

The Beatles - really hard to choose an album ...

Stevie Wonder - Talking Book

 

smily_headphones1.gif

post #131 of 131

Good list, thanks. Let me add a couple more that have influenced my musical tastes.

 

AC/DC- Back in Black

 

The lead singer for AC/DC, Bon Scott, died in 1980 just before Back in Black was released. We all wondered how the band's sound would change with a new singer. No worries, Brian Johnson had it under control. biggrin.gif

 

 

U2- War

 

I love early U2 much better than the later "commercialized" stuff. The first three albums (Boy, October, and War) had a raw edge to the music, no pun intended. War was my favorite of the early stuff and blew me away from first listen.

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