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What's the point of big fat thick high quality cables? - Page 6

post #76 of 82
I think that it is a blend of the artistry and the skill of the person putting the cables together. I enjoy my ALO Super cotton dock in part due to its 'artistic' value as well as its sound.
post #77 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by edstrelow View Post
This table appears to show that as diameter decreases, resistance rises.

American wire gauge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sorry , I goofy it up, I was at the office, thanks sejarzo, let me fix this mess....the table is right, while the diameter increases, the resistance decreases, and vice, the bigger the AWG (gauge) the thinner the wire is....in other words, gauge 30AWG is a thinner cable than a wire 10AWG...OTOH the opposite happen with the lengh, the longer the cable is the worst, as all the bad guys increase with the lengh...unless you want an antenna...
post #78 of 82
Sovkiller, that table is right.

edstrelow and you both wrote the same thing.....just from the opposite starting point.

The table shows a 10 AWG wire has a diameter of 0.102 inch, while a 30 AWG wire has a diameter of 0.0100 inch.
post #79 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by sejarzo View Post
Sovkiller, that table is right.

edstrelow and you both wrote the same thing.....just from the opposite starting point.

The table shows a 10 AWG wire has a diameter of 0.102 inch, while a 30 AWG wire has a diameter of 0.0100 inch.
That is right!!! Sorry I was at the office and read too fast....let me fix that post...
post #80 of 82
About skin effect: True that for audio (and ESPECIALLY power) it is not much of an issue since it generally happens to RF-range signals, like say, in the MHz range and up. (anyone know the exact numbers here?)

That said, it could have a small impact on high frequency reproduction since many amps and tweeters are designed to extend pretty high beyond what the human ear is capable of hearing.

Now, if you argue that a speaker must be able to reproduce >20kHz even though the human ear cannot hear that high, then who's to say that skin effect has no influence on what we can hear.

In all honesty though,-- I sure hope we're talking SACD or better, since the Redbook CD standard has a brickwall frequency limiter at 20kHz.
post #81 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunseeker888 View Post
About skin effect: True that for audio (and ESPECIALLY power) it is not much of an issue since it generally happens to RF-range signals, like say, in the MHz range and up. (anyone know the exact numbers here?)

That said, it could have a small impact on high frequency reproduction since many amps and tweeters are designed to extend pretty high beyond what the human ear is capable of hearing.

Now, if you argue that a speaker must be able to reproduce >20kHz even though the human ear cannot hear that high, then who's to say that skin effect has no influence on what we can hear.

In all honesty though,-- I sure hope we're talking SACD or better, since the Redbook CD standard has a brickwall frequency limiter at 20kHz.
I'm gonna give you a few tips given to my limited knowledge, there is huge difference in reproducing freq around the human threshold, and ones far beyond...
While a manufacturer design a driver or any device able to reproduce up to 20KHz, first there is material indeed recorded at those freq, that regardless that if you can hear or not, you are removing if you cut it before, there is mikes able to record those freq. Also while you cut freq at 20KHz, the roll off begin before the 20KHz mark, what means that you are literally rolling off freq inside the spectrum along with the 20KHz ones, that you could hear, even while the material is not so rich in those on that region...

Now extending it to 3MHz is a complete waste of time, resources, and money, simply the driver or device will be completely linear inside the whole freq spectrum you could posibly hear and dream off hearing, far before that mark, and also I doubt that you can record any material at that high freqs, and you are just looking for troubles, oscillation, etc...and making the project far more expensive.

About the CD and SACD, the most noticeable difference you hear is that the material was remixed and remastered for those new releases, and the dynamic range is far better, now if you listen both the CD DSD, and the SACD on the same hybrid CD, you will notice than the difference is not so big, unless the player has far better performance in SACD than redbook...

If you use a previous release of the same album, to compare, simply you are comparing two different releases, made by two different persons behind the console, and those are the differences you hear, and not the differences between the two different digital medias....just my two cents...
post #82 of 82
No, I actually agree with what you're saying regarding the dynamic range of the mediums and the mastering techniques.

Its interesting to note that on most of the hybrid SACD releases I've listened to, the CD layer was overly compressed and pushed near clipping while the SACD layer was a work of mastering art. So yeah, the main thing with any medium, even analog, is how well it is recorded, or in more accurate terms, what the goal of the recording is. I.e., is it to sell the most records (HOT mastering, lack of dynamics) or to attract the audiophile crowd like specialty labels do?
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