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"Digital Vinyl"? - Page 5

post #61 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssportclay View Post
The turntable itself is by far the most critical equipment in recording vinyl. Spend $10,000 on a turntable,clean your records to as presteen a condition as possible,use a good DAC and Phono preamp,and download any free software you like that will do the job.It just doesn't matter much.
Oh for gods sake. I'm not disputing that the quality of the turntable is important, but if you **** up the recording by using your software badly (or just bad software) you might as well use that ion USB thing.
post #62 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarkovsky View Post
Oh for gods sake. I'm not disputing that the quality of the turntable is important, but if you **** up the recording by using your software badly (or just bad software) you might as well use that ion USB thing.
The less you do to try to improve a recording,the less you destroy it.
post #63 of 152
So why the **** are you transferring it to digital then? Hmmm? You've really missed the point. We're already making an a/d so it's important to do that as well as possible for reasons i have outlined in my previous threads which I suggest you read.
post #64 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maniac View Post
From the description, I'm not sure it even have RIAA equalization, and it might all been done in software.
Actually there are several companies out there that sell flat phono amps for recording into a computer, and then the RIAA is applied much more accurately in digital form than it could be applied from analog circuits.
post #65 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarkovsky View Post
So why the **** are you transferring it to digital then? Hmmm? You've really missed the point. We're already making an a/d so it's important to do that as well as possible for reasons i have outlined in my previous threads which I suggest you read.
I did read all of your posts and I do realize the point is to make a quality digital transfer.I must confess that when starting with a $10,000 turntable as I suggested that damaging it's presteen analog signal through a digital converter does seem very unwise.Most people with such a turntable would be better off just to play the recordings.On the other hand,without the use of such a turntable,you have nothing to begin with.
post #66 of 152
Cool. Sorry to be hot headed. I'm irate as there's been some really bad advice on this thread. It's a silly idea to spend money on A to D if you're not into recording in its own right.
post #67 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sduibek View Post
Hello all, good afternoon!

Check it out: ThinkGeek :: Ion USB Turntable

So, it begs the question -- if you losslessly transfer Vinyl music into digital .WAV format, will it still have the same quality of sound that vinyl junkies have come to know and love?
I think the short answer to the original question is that lossless turntables do not exist and when this analog signal is digitally converted to WAV,more loss or signal damage takes place.Until something better comes along,vinyl junkies will continue to play vinyl on their turntables in real time.All other alternatives are just too compromised.
post #68 of 152
cds sound better than vinyl IMO.
post #69 of 152
I'm sorry, but you completely miss the point. The idea is that people have some great old records they would like to transfer to CD so they can listen to them. Recommending 10 grand turntables and saying that digitization to WAV corrupts the sound puts you on a completely different planet than the rest of the human race. You can feel proud of your high standards if you want. The rest of us will just listen to our music.

For the rest of the world, it is perfectly possible for most folks to transfer their LPs to CD inexpensively and with terrific sound quality. All it takes is a reasonably good turntable, a very good capture card, and software that is able to remove impulse noise without artifacting.

See ya
Steve
post #70 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssportclay View Post
...and when this analog signal is digitally converted to WAV,more loss or signal damage takes place.Until something better comes along,vinyl junkies will continue to play vinyl on their turntables in real time.All other alternatives are just too compromised.
It should be possible to get a pretty transparent transcription of analog into digital, there have been numerous demonstrations of this in blind testing and over 20 - 20k 16/44.1 digital exceeds most of the technical capabilities of vinyl anyway. Vinyl has a slight edge on transient response.
post #71 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
I'm sorry, but you completely miss the point. The idea is that people have some great old records they would like to transfer to CD so they can listen to them. Recommending 10 grand turntables and saying that digitization to WAV corrupts the sound puts you on a completely different planet than the rest of the human race. You can feel proud of your high standards if you want. The rest of us will just listen to our music.

For the rest of the world, it is perfectly possible for most folks to transfer their LPs to CD inexpensively and with terrific sound quality. All it takes is a reasonably good turntable, a very good capture card, and software that is able to remove impulse noise without artifacting.

See ya
Steve
High standards are part of what this forum is about.The original poster was asking about the vinyl experience assuming high standards.I listen to music in my car and at work almost every day.This comes far short of my living room vinyl/digital system but I enjoy it for what it is.I have no problem with people transferring vinyl to digital formats with inexpensive gear either as long as people reading this forum understand that quality compromises take place.
post #72 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssportclay View Post
High standards are part of what this forum is about.
$10,000 turntables and refusing to digitize isn't just "high standards". It's totally impractical advice for 99.999% of all humanity, and it's perfectly possible to compromise in a way that is totally inaudible to 99.999% of all humanity. When you offer advice, you should take into account the situation of the person you're advising, regardless of whether you yourself sit on Mount Olympus or not. The idea is to give them advice that will help them get better sound, not convince them that they could never afford it.

See ya
Steve
post #73 of 152
Thread Starter 
To be honest, I think i'm going to buy this unit... anyone up for some Double-Blind tests using it? Then we can see who is right and who is broke. lol

But in all seriousness, I think I may get the unit if for no other reason than to see where I stand in this arguement. I didn't think i'd get such an emotional response, however I guess I should have known better It's not a bad piece either - Digital storage / copying of the original Vinyl, and playback functionality for your Vinyl (output to a pc soundcard, or a conventional home theater setup)

I've got a sweet integrated amp from the 70s and some great floorstanders... would be nice to hook those up to this little device and see what kind of sound I can get out of the mystery vinyl I picked up...
post #74 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
$10,000 turntables and refusing to digitize isn't just "high standards". It's totally impractical advice for 99.999% of all humanity, and it's perfectly possible to compromise in a way that is totally inaudible to 99.999% of all humanity. When you offer advice, you should take into account the situation of the person you're advising, regardless of whether you yourself sit on Mount Olympus or not. The idea is to give them advice that will help them get better sound, not convince them that they could never afford it.

See ya
Steve
The weak link in transferring vinyl to digital is the turntable itself.The rest of the gear is pretty cheap by comparison.For any one wanting to preserve vinyl in digital for future generations or for sale would be well advised to spend the most on the turntable.The $10,000 figure I picked out of the air as an example to make a point. $2000 to $3000 would probably have been a more practical figure.Certainly no one serious in getting into vinyl would buy a $100 piece of junk. The $10.000 figure I used probably comes short of what the Library of Congress uses but I could be wrong.
post #75 of 152
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssportclay View Post
[snip]$100 piece of junk.[/snip]
Hey now, the seller says it's "Professional quality"

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