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"Digital Vinyl"? - Page 4

post #46 of 152
Playing around with captured audio in Peak. You can learn a lot by playing around with compressors and seeing what effect they have.

See ya
Steve
post #47 of 152
Can a digital transfer sound just like the vinyl?

Yes and no.

Yes it can if you know what your doing.

No it can't because sometimes it can sound better.
post #48 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
Playing around with captured audio in Peak. You can learn a lot by playing around with compressors and seeing what effect they have.

See ya
Steve
Thanks, I do not suppose that this program is free by any chance ?
post #49 of 152
No, I'm afraid not. It's a pro two channel audio editing program... the photoshop of sound.

Give my best to Asta!

See ya
Steve
post #50 of 152
bigshot, you are a well oiled machine. You win this thread.
post #51 of 152
Nevermind, mis-posted
post #52 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by n4k33n View Post
bigshot, you are a well oiled machine. You win this thread.
It's not about winning... I've spent a lot of time puzzling things out experimenting and trial and error. When I've done the gruntwork already, I'd like to help point other people in the right direction so all that time was useful. Learning is a lifelong process. No one should ever be finished learning. I learn new things every day.

See ya
Steve
post #53 of 152
I've skimmed through this thread, some interesting points.

I own a Dual 505 tuntable and a TCC TC-750 pre-amp which, I guess, would connect to my AV-710 sound card. What software do you guys use to convert the vinyl onto the pc?
post #54 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
captured audio in Peak....
Peak is a Mac programme and there is also Soundtrack Pro, which I actually prefer as it allows you to use the Logic Audio plug-ins.

On the PC the best basic one, I find, is Adobe Audition ( formerly Cool Edit Pro ) but there are dozens and you'll find a decent free one on tucows.com

Rather than relying on digitally fixing recordings it's always better to use clean records and the best playback equipment possible in my book.

The Dual CS-505 is a great deck, just be sure to put it on a decent support.
post #55 of 152
How do you mean a decent support? And thanks for the advice.
post #56 of 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by niko-time View Post
How do you mean a decent support? And thanks for the advice.
Turntables are susceptible to vibration. So you want to isolate it as much as possible from the effects of walking over creaky floorboards and so on. if my memory is correct the Dual is sprung which should help a bit. I do not know if Sound Organization is still in business but I had one of their Turntable tables back in the 1980s and helped stop my turntable skipping when I clomped across the floor. Or you could put up a shelf.
post #57 of 152
Thanks a lot!
post #58 of 152
I hope anyone undertaking to transfer vinyl to digital will respect that when using 24 bit the resolution of amplitude is more than ample even at low 'saturation' of the medium - whilst intersample transients will distort even if rms levels are safe.

i.e.
Record at no more than 1/3rd volume maximum volume in your software because you won't gain any detail by using the rest of the bandwidth but you may well destroy intersample transients (cymbols, sibilance) at great levels. This is common recording practice.

I still think if you really care about your recordings you'll get someone who knows what they're doing to get it done with their equipment. A/D has a much worse £$/quality ratio than d/a because of supply to demand. Might be worth it if you're careful and use something a bit nice like the Apogee duet though.

On the issue of winning the flame...

Actually the only person who stood to won here was bigshot, but as they were being too big headed to learn something, they lost out on a bit of education on the differences in the way RIAA vinyl and red book handle sub bass. But don't let that stop you feeling vindicated here.
post #59 of 152
I can recommend this hi res meter which is available in a number of plugin formats. You'd be surprised at how common intersample transients really are. Best of all it's FREE. smassey.com
post #60 of 152
The turntable itself is by far the most critical equipment in recording vinyl. Spend $10,000 on a turntable,clean your records to as presteen a condition as possible,use a good DAC and Phono preamp,and download any free software you like that will do the job.It just doesn't matter much.
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