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So, How's your Leopard experience? - Page 2

post #16 of 45
Here are some possible fixes for your problems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RYCeT View Post
File sharing with windows network
System Preferences>Security>Firewall>Allow all incoming connections

Quote:
Originally Posted by RYCeT View Post
Unable to see one of my NTFS partition
From OSX, use Paragon NTFS or 3G-NTFS; from Windows, use Macdrive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RYCeT View Post
Bootcamp annoying trackpad problem.
Use a mouse.


Hope all goes well for you.

~V
post #17 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by RYCeT View Post
Well, my macbook is my first mac experience and so far I'm loving it. I love iCal, address book, spaces, expose, active corners, widgets. Docks is allright but I prefer windows classic menu. Leopard definitely is a lot better than Vista.

Problems I have which were not fixed up to now,

File sharing with windows network
When I first got my macbook, it able to detect and join my windows network. However, when I start installing osx update, it's all gone and I have to connect them up one by one everytime I start my macbook (smb//...) It sure is annoying and I can't use my printer connected to one of my pc desktop which forced me to connect it directly to my macbook everytime I need to print one.

Unable to see one of my NTFS partition
I've partitioned my hd to 3 partition, HFS+ for OSX, NTFS for Xp, and another NTFS for personal files. I have paragon NTFS to be able to write on NTFS partition from osx. I got no problem writing on ntfs partition on external hd. At first, osx able to see my ntfs partition but it can't see files saved by xp on that partition and vice versa, xp also unable to see files saved by osx. Now, osx is unable even to see that ntfs partition eventhough it's working fine when I use xp from bootcamp.

bootcamp annoying trackpad problem.
It's very annoying to type in my xp bootcamp since they have not figure out on putting trackpad menu. I want double tap, disable trackpad while typing.

I also recently just dived into the Mac world with my MacBook. Took a few days to get used to the OS. But now whenever I've got to switch back to Windows on a friends computer for instance, I feel so lost lol. Wheres my apple button!? lol

I really like Spaces. It really helps since the desktop space on these little macbooks are so tiny. iCal is great too. Widgets are really useful. I use iStat Pro to keep track of Cpu temperature and memory use.

Only problems so far is that a lot of the programs I planned to run still aren't Leopard compatible yet (Protools, Recycle 2.1). Guess that isn't really the OS' fault.... sorta lol.
post #18 of 45
Would you consider Leopard just another evolutionary release of Mac OS X, or is it really the start of Mac OS XI (i. e. is it radically different under the hood, with OS X moniker just kept for marketing purposes)?
post #19 of 45
I've been running Leopard since the day it was released.

Just updated to 10.5.2, and still, zero problems.
post #20 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mshan View Post
Would you consider Leopard just another evolutionary release of Mac OS X, or is it really the start of Mac OS XI (i. e. is it radically different under the hood, with OS X moniker just kept for marketing purposes)?
I have only used Panther through Leopard but I must say from my perspective it seems that Leopard is closer to a XI release than the other releases. 10.5 is incredible over 10.4 not just with stability and speed but with the added features in the gui and file system. The added programs, tightly integrated like Time Machine make 10.5 the OS to beat in today's marketplace in my opinion.

With Bootcamp and VM Fusion (I favour this over Parallels) a Mac can become the perfect workstation or desktop/home computer.

Those that want to run FOSS exclusively will always turn to linux or *bsd and those that want gaming will likely always have to remain in the Windows camp unless they are willing to dual boot on the MAC.

Yet for everything else I find that my work flow has improved and the ease of use has increased and time to do monotonous tasks has decreased. With integrated scripting with Apple Scripts, even monotonous tasks can be easily done away with.
post #21 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mshan View Post
Would you consider Leopard just another evolutionary release of Mac OS X, or is it really the start of Mac OS XI (i. e. is it radically different under the hood, with OS X moniker just kept for marketing purposes)?
There's no question Leopard has more changes under the hood than any previous OS X release: LLVM, dTrace, ZFS, Core Animation, ObjC 2.0, 64-bit Cocoa, shared calendar store+CalDAV, etc. That's just the new stuff too; it doesn't count the important changes to older things.
post #22 of 45
Spaces was great before I killed my MacBook. On the iMac with screen spanning to a 24" Dell, I don't really use it anymore.

I LOVE Time Machine. It saved my butt when I drowned the MacBook. I still use SuperDuper and CarbonCopyCloner for secondary backups and moving things around between drives, so I could have lived without TM.

10.5.2 seems to be a bit problematic (or perhaps the graphics update that came after?). The Shell screensaver will now freeze up my iMac, so I had to quit using it. I've also had a system freeze while using the computer normally (first time since 10.1 that I've had one of those!) -- but that could have been hardware-related.

Overall, though, a positive experience with Leopard.

--Chris
post #23 of 45
I'm certain that 95% of the problems with Leopard were due to having old software installed. The one major issue of a blue screen on start-up was caused by third party software installed that hadn't been updated for a long time.

Those of you that have problems - do they occur if you're logged in as another user to your machine? You'll find slow boots and other problems are caused by stuff you've installed way back and forgotten about that causing issues. You can hold down command-v at boot to see all the system messages in which you might be able to see what's slowing things down.
post #24 of 45
No mean to hijack the thread, but I want to give Mac a try just to know it more, I don't know anyone that uses Mac either. I had to use a mac computer at work today which kind of gets me curious. I still rather have Windows for all the performance needs, but I'm looking for some other fun experiences since I have been bored using windows for the last 10 years. Unless I'm missing something Leopard OS looks like it's at about $100 which is really affordable comparing to Vista.

I still don't know how they fit all that into a 24" monitor, but it uses much less electricity than my midtower.
post #25 of 45
A mac mini is a great choice, imho. I use mine as a media pc.
post #26 of 45
I have been having one problem with Leopard. Whenever I close my laptop lid and open it back up the dock won't work or pop up for a while. Not sure why it is doing this.
post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrymx View Post
Unless I'm missing something Leopard OS looks like it's at about $100 which is really affordable comparing to Vista.
Correct! Mac OS 10.5 single-user license is $129.00.
post #28 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by terrymx View Post
No mean to hijack the thread, but I want to give Mac a try just to know it more, I don't know anyone that uses Mac either. I had to use a mac computer at work today which kind of gets me curious. I still rather have Windows for all the performance needs, but I'm looking for some other fun experiences since I have been bored using windows for the last 10 years. Unless I'm missing something Leopard OS looks like it's at about $100 which is really affordable comparing to Vista.
Vista pricing makes no sense. Especially when it really offers very little new over XP or that you can source for free. Bells and whistles.

Lots of extra's in OS X 10.5.

Quote:
Originally Posted by terrymx View Post
I still don't know how they fit all that into a 24" monitor, but it uses much less electricity than my midtower.
Your mini tower proabably has spare capacity in power terms for you to add power hungry components like HD's optical drives, graphics cards etc. You can't do that on the iMac which I assume your talking about. Ones a city car the others a Small van. Bad analogy, but you get the idea.

I use Mac's on and off. But what made computing fun was always having something new to play with. So I'd like to get Mac myself to play with. I still need Windows PC for work & games though.
post #29 of 45
You know macs can run windows either in a window (with parallels etc) or a separate boot partition right?
post #30 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by grawk View Post
You know macs can run windows either in a window (with parallels etc) or a separate boot partition right?
Yes but for the spec I needed for a .net and MS SQL development and games. The PC hardware was half the price. It would make no sense to ditch my year old 17" XP laptop, to get at best (being optimistic) the same performance (in games and development apps) but pay twice the price if not more for a new MacBookPro. (I'm not in the US). Not managed to find what (IMO) is a bargain in used, or refurbs MacBooks/MBP's yet.
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