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Vinyl Static ?

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
What's the best way to get rid of static on vinyl, Some of my LPs have so much static that the felt mat lifts off and stays attached to the disc.

I have seen the guns, do they work or are they just a gimmick ?

If they work is there a cheaper alternative than the milti zerostat, I would rather spend $100 on records.

Any other ways of removing the static and is it always as bad as I have described or could they be something wrong with my set up thats causing the static in the first place ?

Cheers
post #2 of 24
on my lp12 i have used some double sided tape to keep the felt mat in place, i dont have any sound issues with static, and it works to keep it sticking to the record.
post #3 of 24
If you have lots of static in your house, try a humidifier.
post #4 of 24
A couple of products from Mapleshade have turned out to be excellent at controlling and/or getting rid of static.

Mapleshade Audio Products - Phonophile Static Draining Record Brush

Mapleshade Audio Products - Ionoclast

Clean you records with a vacuum-style wet cleaner. Zap them a couple times with the ionoclast. Then, when ready to play, brush them with the record brush. Problem should be solved.
post #5 of 24

Here's Some Solutions...

I used to use:

1. Anti-Static sprays
2. Zerostat
3. Record Cleaning Machines
4. Anti-static brush

Here are some links:

Anti-Static Spray

Amazon.com: Kensington(R) Dust Guardian(R) Anti-Static Spray, 32 Oz.: Electronics

Static Cling Spray | Static Guard | Walgreens

Antistatic Spray - Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at NexTag - Price - Review

Mapleshade Audio Products - Ionoclast

While these will remove static electical charges, you'll still have pops from grime and artifacts in the grooves - some, which you can remove, and some, which you can't.

The sprays are likely the most cost effective. Get some at Radio Shack, or Walmart.
post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4N6 View Post
A couple of products from Mapleshade have turned out to be excellent at controlling and/or getting rid of static.

Mapleshade Audio Products - Phonophile Static Draining Record Brush

Mapleshade Audio Products - Ionoclast

Clean you records with a vacuum-style wet cleaner. Zap them a couple times with the ionoclast. Then, when ready to play, brush them with the record brush. Problem should be solved.
More like it, pricewise. I take it these things actually work ? It looks like the thing you use to light a gas burner ?
post #7 of 24
I use an Audiquest carbon brush before playing each side. It takes care of the static and any surface dust. They run about $20.
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by omegaman View Post
I have seen the guns, do they work or are they just a gimmick ? If they work is there a cheaper alternative than the milti zerostat, I would rather spend $100 on records.
I agree with 4N6's approach. The only way to reliably and consistently beat static on vinyl is wet cleaning and vacuuming, ensuring that the record side is completely covered in cleaning fluid (no air gaps) and that the fluid is then vacuumed away using a vacuum attachment that either does not make any contact with the vinyl surface or at worse makes "wet" contact with the surface. I would also advise copious "full coverage" rinsing with distilled water subsequent to this in the same mannner (ie vacuuming it off). As soon as you attempt any sort of "dry" cleaning, it will just make the static problems worse.

My experience is that the zerostat you speak of is 20% effective and 80% placebo. It is, however, useful as a quick squirt just before the record goes on the platter, but the effect is nothing remotely close to the power of wet cleaning.

You will be amazed at the quietness of vinyl when a proper cleaning procedure is in place. But there are only two main words to remember in quietning down vinyl - "wet" and "vacuum".

As far as preparation just prior to playing an LP, I would advise steering clear of any sort of brush, apart from carbon fibre. But even as far as carbon fibre is concerned, off the shelf it has no innate capability of removing static per se - all it can do is clean the surface without adding static. You thus need to ground the brush. Since I haven't actually found a brush that has a grounding wire, apart from the dust bug (which is no use for pre-cleaning), I modified my Audioquest brush so that it shares a common ground with the rest of the system. Not all brushes can be grounded either. For example the Hunt can't be, since the body does not conduct from the brush fibres. But you can ground the Audioquest without problems (might lose some hairs initially though).
post #9 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD View Post
I agree with 4N6's approach... You thus need to ground the brush. Since I haven't actually found a brush that has a grounding wire...
The Maleshade brush IS a brush with a grounding wire. It plugs into the grounding portion of the 3-prong outlet. The "bristles" are VERY fine stainless steel. EXTREMELY soft, yet are conductive. They will draw the electrostatic charge from your LP and short it to ground. This removes the static charge and makes the record much more quiet. HIGHLY recommended!

The Ionoclast creates acharge that neutralizes the static charge in the record. Similiar to a Zerostat, yet much more effective (I own both and do not recommend the Zerostat).
post #10 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by omegaman View Post
...I take it these things actually work ? ...
Yes, they work VERY well. I had a lot of problem with static also. Those accessories solved that problem.

Also mentioned earlier was a humidifier. That also helps a great deal as static electricity certainly builds up more in a dry home.
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the help guy's. I will start looking into the Ionoclast accessories.

I would love a wet vacuuming system but they are a bit expensive.
post #12 of 24
A wet vacuum system is not expensive if you are prepared to DIY. I use a very cheap $45 turntable as my cleaning platform and the vacuum is just one of the wet cleaners you can buy from an auto store for much the same price. They do need modication though - since you have to make a vacuum attachment that sucks up all the fluid from the record but does not scratch it and allows it to continue rotating. But that part is really just manual labour and a bit of commonsense (and a handful of dollars in parts - for example - for the cushioning layer between the vinyl record and the vacuum inlet in case the two touch together (I use the material from the Maguires microfibre chamois).

As for brushes, I do use the VPI brush that is available as a spare part for their record cleaning machines, however you'd be needing one of those eventually anyway if you had a "proper" machine.

The other beauty of DIY is that you are not bound by the cleaning methodology built into a commercial cleaning machine. With DIY, it is possible to be much more thorough with correspondingly improved results.
post #13 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADD View Post
I use a very cheap $45 turntable as my cleaning platform and the vacuum is just one of the wet cleaners you can buy from an auto store for much the same price.
You can also get the KABUSA stripped down version of the Nitty Gritty system for 100USD.
post #14 of 24
I hardly go to such lengths to clean my records. I prefer careful handling. The last thing I want after all is too much groove wall wear out, and the subsequent increase in tracking weight to still get the same sort of emotions through my speakers.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herandu View Post
I hardly go to such lengths to clean my records. I prefer careful handling. The last thing I want after all is too much groove wall wear out, and the subsequent increase in tracking weight to still get the same sort of emotions through my speakers.
What are you saying that vacuum cleaning your records causes groove damage? Surely grinding a layer of dust in the groove walls with your stylus is more likely to do that
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