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How do I convert FLAC to Apple Lossless? - Page 3

post #31 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hero Kid View Post
Two year bump? Well done romanovsky.
yeah and considering this is his first post!!
post #32 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheule View Post
If a Mac user is wondering the same question, a great free app for Mac OS X to convert FLAC to AIFF or whatever is called xACT. It stands for X Audio Compression Toolkit, and can be located at versiontracker.com
If you're on a mac get XLD from this link X Lossless Decoder: Lossless audio decoder for Mac OS X , XLD will transcode from flac to Apple Lossless, wav, aiff, etc.
post #33 of 58

Hey guys,

 

Found an easy solution (for us iTunes and iPod users) using only iTunes and Fluke for Mac.

 

Turns out you can actually import anything into ALAC with iTunes itself.

 

http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1550

post #34 of 58

bump

 

post #35 of 58

I use MelodyCan to convert flac . Works Perfect .    

post #36 of 58

Max for converting if you're on a Mac. XLD for ripping.

post #37 of 58

Is there any difference in SQ between Max and iTunes? I can't tell right now but I'll hate to find a difference a few years down the road and then having to re-rip everything again.

post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by tanyeehou View Post

Is there any difference in SQ between Max and iTunes? I can't tell right now but I'll hate to find a difference a few years down the road and then having to re-rip everything again.


There could be, if iTunes fail to get the right bits of the CD while Max do not.

One of the benefit of specialized audio CD ripper applications like Max, Rip, XLD, ... are that they have stronger error fighting capabilities than iTunes.

post #39 of 58

I found this quote from a member of another forum, which sums up exactly what I was going to say.

In summary use XLD, set it up correctly and be comforted with the fact that you are maximizing your chances of creating 100% flawless rips.

Quote:

To the specific benefits, XLD attempts to correct all errors encountered using the appropriately named and highly regarded CDParanoia engine. XLD also informs you of any errors that could NOT be corrected, whereas iTunes does not. With iTunes you find out later, when listening. :)

 

Secondly, there is the capability to compare your rips to the Accurate Rip database for checksum comparison between other known rips. This is often considered the primary benefit of using XLD, or other rippers with this capability, as this CAN be the ultimate in 'peace of mind', or the source of loss thereof.

 

Additionally, XLD will correct for any offset in the drive itself. The offset correction is automatic, in that XLD defaults to the known settings for most common drives, and you need do nothing. These is (admittedly very) little evidence that offset can affect the sound, despite that it has been reported anecdotally.

 

You can also set up XLD for something called C2 error correction, drive permitting.

 

Finally, XLD offers many options in it's ripping function, seemingly more than anyone could need. For example, the list of available formats to rip to includes formats I didn't know existed. Ditto for options like re-trying with bad disks, scanning disks for potentially bad sectors, etc.

 

With pristine discs, iTunes probably (some would say definitely, and Kent Poom famously said definitively') rips as well as other programs, but gives NO indication of any undesirable behavior with discs that are less than perfect, and thus the aforementioned lack of 'peace of mind'.

 

The developer for XLD is a very dedicated Japanese fellow, who is constantly improving and/or adding features to XLD. There was a release Christmas Day I think.

 

So, in the end you trade one 'peace of mind' for another. With iTunes, you lose peace of mind due to not knowing if your rips are error-free. With XLD (and other programs), you lose 'peace of mind' due to now knowing if you've set all the available options correctly, or when your rip's checksum does not match the Accurate Rip database, or perhaps even due to wondering whether to re-rip now that a new feature offering even more 'peace of mind' is available. :)


Edited by Hero Kid - 7/14/10 at 1:08am
post #40 of 58

I hope there's no loss when migrating from one lossless format to another? I got some flac-8 tracks and i encoded one of them to .m4a using dbpoweramp. I hope i retained everything.

post #41 of 58

Ha thanks for bumping this thread. I was thinking about trying to find my above post only yesterday. Now I don't have to.

post #42 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by therock003 View Post

I hope there's no loss when migrating from one lossless format to another? I got some flac-8 tracks and i encoded one of them to .m4a using dbpoweramp. I hope i retained everything.


If you go from FLAC to Apple Lossless directly using dbpoweramp, there is no loss.

post #43 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by gtp View Post

There is a ALAC plugin for foobar. I think you can do it all directly in foobar and not lose tags or anything.


I am using this http://sbooth.org/Max/

post #44 of 58

Thanks bud 
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheule View Post

If a Mac user is wondering the same question, a great free app for Mac OS X to convert FLAC to AIFF or whatever is called xACT. It stands for X Audio Compression Toolkit, and can be located at versiontracker.com


 

post #45 of 58

why isn't max just as good at ripping?

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