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My Top 5 Minimalism Picks - Page 2

post #16 of 66
Reich has definitely put out some amazing work. I've seen him perform, and seen others perform his work. I have his "Works" box set, which is a 10CD set. I was considering buying Phases, but then I saw this one. I don't believe they make it anymore, however.

Thanks for the Arvo Part recommendations. I'd always meant to listen to him.
post #17 of 66
Thread Starter 
A couple of things to add...

First off, Riley is one of the founders of minimalism. His "in C" deserves to be heard (and is especially great on the version that I recommend). End of story.

Second, I realized that Phases is the 5 CD set... just kept saying 9 for some reason. Haha.
post #18 of 66
Monolake is decent electronic minimalism. Monolake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

They have a couple of mp3's you can download from their site too. monolake
post #19 of 66
Reich's "Telihim" is also a very beatiful work of minimalism, if you haven't heard it yet. Highly recommended.

And great choice regarding Terry Riley's "In C" - I just recently saw it performed by my college's very ambitious New Music Ensemble.
post #20 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalconP View Post
What baffles me is why Terry Riley is still stuck in the minimalist camp. In C is so long ago and he never wrote anything like that since (as far as I'm aware). Afterwards Riley is more of an improviser and writes microtonal music that sounds improvised.
Untitled Organ, one of his other more renowned works, is a 20-minute long organ drone. Olson III, one of my all-time favorite pieces of music, is a very interesting minimalist piece. It contains Riley as conductor and saxophone improviser, with a choir repeating the words "to begin" over and over and over again, complimented by a very sharp orchestral section. I think Riley is just a little more wide-ranged than other minimalist composers, but much of his work is still very much grounded in minimalism.
post #21 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by FalconP View Post
What baffles me is why Terry Riley is still stuck in the minimalist camp.
For that matter, why is John Adams? He hasn't done a minimalist work in twenty years, surely?

I guess they're there because they were minimalist "when it counted" (i.e. in time to have an influence).

My favourite work by Riley is Salome Dances For Peace: not in the least a minimalist work, but a much better demonstration of his strengths as a composer than In C.
post #22 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkweg View Post
Monolake is decent electronic minimalism.
I would recommend Robert Henke's solo work as Robert Henke for minimalism...Monolake is much more techno/IDM/beat oriented.

Murcof is another brilliant artist to check out.
post #23 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aman View Post
Reich's "Telihim" is also a very beatiful work of minimalism, if you haven't heard it yet. Highly recommended.

And great choice regarding Terry Riley's "In C" - I just recently saw it performed by my college's very ambitious New Music Ensemble.
I'm performing this work at the end of march with my new music ensemble. (playing percussion)

Also, I'm doing studio recordings of New York Counterpoint, and Spiegel Im Spiegel next week (Both for clarinet).

Check out my Myspace if you are interested. www.myspace.com/seanperrin
post #24 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sordel View Post
For that matter, why is John Adams? He hasn't done a minimalist work in twenty years, surely?
I'm not the biggest fan of John Adams (save the piano "gates"). To me he's not true minimalism, I don't think he "gets it." Like Pärt is a genius of few notes and no note is ever wasted or there without reason. Adams seems to be a minimalist just for the sake.

"In art anything is possible, but all that is made is not necessary" Arvo Pärt

EDIT: Very ironic as when I clicked "post" Adams' Gnarly Buttons started playing... and then proved my point. Lol.
post #25 of 66
I consider some of the music I listen to "minimalist" but not in that strict sense. It's usually more light electronic music.

However, I have listened to one piece in particular that would fit that description, especially concerning the repetitious element.

Perpetuum Mobile - Penguin Cafe Orchestra

I think it was featured on a commercial, but can also find it on the link above on Youtube. Quite nice.
post #26 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by erythrophyte View Post
I consider some of the music I listen to "minimalist" but not in that strict sense. It's usually more light electronic music.

However, I have listened to one piece in particular that would fit that description, especially concerning the repetitious element.

Perpetuum Mobile - Penguin Cafe Orchestra

I think it was featured on a commercial, but can also find it on the link above on Youtube. Quite nice.
Thanks for that..!

You especially would enjoy Canto Ostinato.... very poppy yet artsy sound. Excellent piece!
post #27 of 66
Interesting! I will check out this genre..
post #28 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Interesting! I will check out this genre..
Please do... you'll love it!
post #29 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by krmathis View Post
Interesting! I will check out this genre..
I will just say that minimalism has become such a pervasive cultural influence now that it's difficult to go back and hear it as anything extraordinary. Glass's score for Koyaanisqatsi and its two successors was so successful, for example, that it's become a cliche to use his music in just about any documentary (or for that matter, advertising) context. Anyone wanting to get that WTF? moment now should probably try something really early such as 1966's "Come Out" by Steve Reich.
post #30 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sordel View Post
Anyone wanting to get that WTF? moment now should probably try something really early such as 1966's "Come Out" by Steve Reich.
I dunno…dig that piece, too (saw it recontextualized in a solo dance piece by the Belgian choreographer Anne Teresa de Keersmaeker not too long ago), but mightn't it be a little too "WTF?" for nascent listeners? If you've been trying to get folks into this music for awhile, I'm sure you know how people talk; there's folks out there who don't consider sampling and tape-loops as music. I tend to suggest pieces by Morton Feldman or Arvo Pärt; maybe I'm wrong, but that's not music I often hear in too many other contexts. With Feldman in particular, it's a question of scale. His best pieces are quite long.
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