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Processor Question

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quick question for those with experience with computers: I have a HP nc6000 laptop right now, with a 845MP chipset in it. It has a 400 MHz FSB for the processor, and I have a 1.6 GHz Banias Pentium-M in it. Would it be possible to plug in a 533 MHz Dothan Pentium-M running at 1.86 GHz? I can get a Dothan processor for cheap, and I'm not too concerned about losing the additional clock cycles. I'm more interested in having more L2 cache and the lower voltage the Dothan core runs at. If anyone can clarify this, I'd be very grateful.
post #2 of 8
I do not believe you can, unless you do some heavy modifying.
post #3 of 8
I doubt that would work, but NotebookForums.com - Notebookforums.com Notebook reviews - laptops reviews would be a very good place to go looking
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Been going through Notebookforums, couldn't find anything. Well, no biggie, just wondering if I can shove a faster processor into my old HP laptop and get maybe another year out of it before getting a new laptop.
post #5 of 8
Sorry, that'd be nigh-impossible. Not only would you need a lot of knowledge on how to disassemble said notebook and plug the processor in, most notebook motherboards use a BGA (ball-grid array) which means that the chip is soldered in and is almost impossible to remove (feel like soldering 900+ joints?)
post #6 of 8
Yup - most notebooks have soldered-in chips. They're not like PC motherboards.

GAD
post #7 of 8
This the laptop you have?

You should be able to stick any of the 400 MHz FSB Dothans listed there without any issues and get a nice speed bump along with a power drop. You may need a BIOS update to run a Dothan chip, and since Dothans are offered in factory configurations for your laptop, you should be able to get it from HP.

Not too sure about a 533 MHz one though and I wouldn't risk it. I think they only run on Sonoma chipsets. Even if they could run at the lower bus speed, the BIOS may need a CPU look up table update that doesn't exist.

Quote:
Originally Posted by roastpuff
Sorry, that'd be nigh-impossible. Not only would you need a lot of knowledge on how to disassemble said notebook and plug the processor in, most notebook motherboards use a BGA (ball-grid array) which means that the chip is soldered in and is almost impossible to remove (feel like soldering 900+ joints?)
Most laptops from that time span still used Socket 479 Micro-FCPGA packaging. BGA packaging at the time was relegated to ultraportables and embedded systems.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by marvin View Post
This the laptop you have?

You should be able to stick any of the 400 MHz FSB Dothans listed there without any issues and get a nice speed bump along with a power drop. You may need a BIOS update to run a Dothan chip, and since Dothans are offered in factory configurations for your laptop, you should be able to get it from HP.

Not too sure about a 533 MHz one though and I wouldn't risk it. I think they only run on Sonoma chipsets. Even if they could run at the lower bus speed, the BIOS may need a CPU look up table update that doesn't exist.



Most laptops from that time span still used Socket 479 Micro-FCPGA packaging. BGA packaging at the time was relegated to ultraportables and embedded systems.
Yeah, that's my laptop. The fact that later revisions have the Dothan chips in them, is that I'm pretty sure they support it. I do have the latest BIOS, so it's the processor I'm thinking of. I'm looking at processors from eBay right now, and the higher-end Dothans running at 400 MHz FSB is too expensive in my view. I can settle for a lower specced proc, as I'm planning to get a new laptop anyway, and use it as a dedicated Ubuntu laptop or something else.
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