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cutoff frequency? what does it do

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
well im trying to set up the bass boost on my creative sound card cause i think the bass on my ad900 is kinda small and there is a thing under it that says cutoff frequency, im wondering what it does and how it affects sound quality
post #2 of 10
The deeper the bass the more power is required. The cutoff frequency should roll off any bass below a certain frequency, so the speakers aren't forced to try and play them. If they do try and play frequencies below what they are made to it can strain the speakers and the amp unnecessarily.
post #3 of 10
attenuation past cutoff frequencies
post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
so is it cutting the low sounds and taking them off completely?
post #5 of 10
That depends on how steep the curve is, but generally no most are gentle slopes not brickwalls. A brickwall filter is one that cuts off the sound completly, where most roll them off slowly.

It should give a specific frequency and slope in the manual (eg 12db/octve). The higher the db drop per octave the less amount you will get below that frequency.
post #6 of 10
In an EQ program/plug-in, "cutoff frequency" is the frequency around which the sound is boost or cut, for example low shelf, low-pass, high-pass, high shelf, etc.

From reading your other thread, it sounds like you want the cutoff frequency to be in the lower frequencies with a low shelf boost--everything below the cutoff frequency will be boosted.
post #7 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitesymphony View Post
From reading your other thread, it sounds like you want the cutoff frequency to be in the lower frequencies with a low shelf boost--everything below the cutoff frequency will be boosted.
I think your backwards on this. The bass boost will provide a gradual increase in low frequencies at some pre-defined slope and frequency starting point. The cutoff is so that you don't continue to amplify low frequencies lower that point X where it will agressively start rolling off at some pre-defined slope ie 18/24 db/octave. The normal cutoff point for human hearing is typically 32hz. below that it becomes more tactical that audible.
post #8 of 10
He's trying to duplicate a setup on his iPod where he has a low shelf boost in the low frequencies. This shouldn't be difficult to perform with any decent EQ plug-in.

But you're right, "center frequency" is the correct term if he's only interested in boosting a certain range (i.e. band-pass filter). My terminology was a bit off.
post #9 of 10
I was trying to keep it simple. It did sound like you knew what you were talking about. I am very familiar with shelving, Q,'s, etc.. and I have a very bad cold and for the life of me, I could not remember the word, center frequency. Thanks!
post #10 of 10

Hey guys...I know this thread is old as dirt but was wondering if someone could lend a quick hand in helping me determine what cutoff frequency I should be using in my Creative Software for my Auzentech HT HD Soundcard. I play music in Entertainment Mode & game in Game Mode - they do sound a little different. I have the bass set to 3.0dB on both settings and am not sure what the cutoff frequency should be? I looked online and found some very technical/confusing audiophile stuff that I didn't quit understand...thnx in advance for any help as it's much appreciated. 

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