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Anybody else using studio monitors? - Page 6

post #76 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitesymphony View Post
Thank you for commenting. It's true that specifications aren't everything, and it's not possible to know exactly how a system will sound just by looking at numbers.

The higher-end models look nice, so I'll limit my comments to the Media Desk. It seems that such a small set, even with sealed enclosures and nice drivers, will still have frequency reproduction problems. A crossover frequency of 110 Hz is high enough that the subwoofer will be playing directional frequencies. The threshold of directionality is roughly 100 Hz, and given that the low-pass filter is set to 110 Hz, even higher frequencies will be played as the filter slopes downward. The satellites' nominal operation frequencies are between 300 Hz - 10 kHz. Above and below that, they begin to roll off. The subwoofer begins to roll off at 35 Hz. In other words, the speakers are not full-range.

I love smaller 2.1 systems for computer areas, and I've owned and heard a fair number of them. But in my experience, none of them were accurate. However, most of them still managed to sound good, just as I'm sure many people find the Media Desk to sound great.

This isn't my thread, so I apologize to the OP and others for the slightly off-topic post.
Hello Again:

A few more comments:

The SATs "nominal operation frequencies" are not 300 Hz - 10 kHz. The operating frequency range is 110 to 20 kHz (+/- 3.0dB) as you can see here.

The SUB is sealed and does begin to roll-off at 35Hz, at 12dB per octave, which is much better than any traditional near field monitor, which is typically ported, rolls off at around 24dB per octave or greater and rarely do they touch 35Hz.

With regard to directionality: Directional acuity and the ability to locate the source of a sound, is much more complicated than just the crossover frequency. For this application, where the SUB is typically located very close to, or inbetween the SATs, directional acuity is going to be very low with regard to the SUB. This is especially true for a sealed box system, that has the subwoofer integrated into the design from the start. For more information about subwoofer directionality, please follow this link.

I hope this helps explain it a little better.

Cheers!
post #77 of 172
the alesis are great speaker especially for the price.

gotta keep in mind tho that studio monitors are meant for near field monitoring and sound best at close range. but i think if you are within 4 feet you are fine.

i'm running some tannoy ellipse 10's and theya re incredible. but it's in my studio that I also use when i'm on the computer working.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vulc4n View Post
I'm thinking about trying the Alesis Monitor Ones MKII as well. I'd like to see how they compare. Even if they sound very similar I might go for those anyway. The ST6's have been discontinued which will make them hard to get later on when I want to go to 5.1



If I had the money I probably would have gone for one of those.
post #78 of 172
is it acceptable to use a tube driven microphone preamp (presonus bluetube DP) as a method of "coloring" the sound in speakers?

or am I missing something with this idea
post #79 of 172
After adding the BX10S sub woofer to my system (E-MU 1212m, Yamaha MG10/2, M-Audio BX8s, wired with Mogami Gold) my headphone usage dropped way down. After Iron_Dreamer built my new quiet computer, my headphone usage became almost non-existent.
post #80 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Naga View Post
is it acceptable to use a tube driven microphone preamp (presonus bluetube DP) as a method of "coloring" the sound in speakers?

or am I missing something with this idea
Tube microphone preamps, especially at that price point, are really awful with regards to SNR and dynamic range. They're designed to give the stereotypical "tube sound," which in the case of a cheap mic pre is a lot of harmonic distortion. You would have to find a fairly expensive tube preamplifier to maintain the original signal quality.

Some monitors sound warm without having to tweak the inputs--they aren't all designed to be perfectly flat. Otherwise, you might have more luck with a passive setup, since you'll be able to switch out both the preamp and power amp(s).
post #81 of 172
I'm using M-Audio BX8A's that I purchased from a fellow HeadFi-er about 3 weeks ago. I am really enjoying them, especially for the price. Here are my quick impressions:

-- Very large, difficult to position on a desk. Need to be raised up a few inches for proper imaging (haven't done that yet). Impractical to place on a desk, but that's how I have them set up.
-- Very neutral, accurate sound. Far more neutral than all my headphones. The closest phones I own that come close are the Beyer DT880 and the M-Audio Q40.
-- Treble appears slightly bright (compared to other speakers/headphones), but not sibilant. Slightly less bright than DT880, but still on the bright side in my opinion.

But all in all I'm very happy with them. I'm using a Cambridge Audio 840C as a source and a Little Dot MK IV SE as a preamp to add tube warmth, liquidity, and also volume control of course.
post #82 of 172
I need a THX-certified near-field system. Is there anything better than the JBL LSR6325P at their price-point?
post #83 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyface View Post
I need a THX-certified near-field system. Is there anything better than the JBL LSR6325P at their price-point?
Why do they need to be THX-certified? It's not an indication of quality...

If you must have the little logo on the speakers, the Mackie HR624mk2 are THX pm3 certified and in the same price range.

Edit: Here's a slightly outdated list of all of the monitors that have THX pm3 certification. It's a small list because companies basically pay to be on it. So many excellent speakers are not on that list--they didn't want to pay THX for a meaningless specification.
post #84 of 172
Hi infinite symphony!

This requirement is because I do film projects that (when I am better!) may see play in a film festival, and i assume these will use THX reproductions because they will be in a film theater, and I would hope that the audio I mix for them sounds right in that venue.

So you suggest the Mackies are better than the JBL I mentioned? Just making sure! I will look at them right now!!!
post #85 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyface View Post
This requirement is because I do film projects that (when I am better!) may see play in a film festival, and i assume these will use THX reproductions because they will be in a film theater, and I would hope that the audio I mix for them sounds right in that venue.
THX is really just a standards group. It's not important that your monitors have THX certification, it's important that your playback room be set up according to THX guidelines (Dolby also has a recommendation). This will make your mixes sound much more accurate in the theater, regardless of which monitors you use for mixing. Big-budget movies are mixed in actual theaters, so your setup will only approximate the real thing anyway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by crazyface
So you suggest the Mackies are better than the JBL I mentioned? Just making sure! I will look at them right now!!!
I've never heard the JBLs, so I don't have a better/worse opinion, but I would certainly give them a look. I've had good luck with Mackies, so that's where I'd personally look first.
post #86 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by infinitesymphony View Post
Tube microphone preamps, especially at that price point, are really awful with regards to SNR and dynamic range. They're designed to give the stereotypical "tube sound," which in the case of a cheap mic pre is a lot of harmonic distortion. You would have to find a fairly expensive tube preamplifier to maintain the original signal quality.

Some monitors sound warm without having to tweak the inputs--they aren't all designed to be perfectly flat. Otherwise, you might have more luck with a passive setup, since you'll be able to switch out both the preamp and power amp(s).
Thats pretty much what I want to do w/ the presonus CS. I am just trying to figure out how to get a tube option in the chain.

the HR824 seems to be the favorable option now - ill forgo the tubes for now i guess
post #87 of 172
Quote:
Originally Posted by porschemad911 View Post
My Behringer MS-40s arrived today, and I'm very happy. Actually, I'm quite astonished at the sound quality for the lowly price.

The only issue I've been having is the left woofer occasionally buzzes on tracks with heavy bass. *Sigh* I do hope it's not faulty. It does seem to be going away as the speakers burn in however. I'll see how it progresses. I opened the speaker up and couldn't find anything loose, although the extremely heavy magnet (for shielding, I'm assuming) had a *tiny* bit of movement, if you flexed it on purpose.

If they do turn out to be faulty, I will definitely buy another pair to replace them, I'm very happy with them as an economical, practical replacement for my Rega -> Graham Slee -> K-701 setup!

I can't get my Behringer UCA202 doing ASIO from Foobar as yet (with either Behringer's drivers or Asio4All), but it sounds fine to me playing from WMP so I'll probably just leave it at that. I like the 'optical out straight into the speakers' feature! I had forgotten what feeling bass instead of just hearing it was like.
Well, I am now the owner of a pair of Tascam VL-X5s, which soundly trounce my Behringers. No more muddy midrange, just beautiful clarity!

Now all I need is a decent external sound card (the Behringer's good for optical out, but the analogue outs are pretty noisy), I'm thinking a Lexicon Alpha (great value, read a good review).
post #88 of 172
Congrats on the VL-X5s, these are nice. I have mine set up at ear level with some DIY stands, with 8k and 3k @ -1.5 dB and some bass boost (150 Hz +1.5 dB, I like it better that way). Do pay attention to those DIP switches, the factory settings may not make a whole lot of sense (I found the 500 Hz highpass to be enabled, for example). Some black tape took care of the front LEDs.
If I were to complain about anything, it would be the hum - but then my listening distance is quite small, normally it's not objectionable beyond about 1 m. (Other models have far more severe problems than that - like even louder hum and hiss that is still audible 3 m away.)

The current replacement model seems to be the VL-A5, btw - they now have a whole lineup, with a closed 4" model and BR 8" model for the bottom and top end, respectively.

I guess I'm a member of team "my headphone usage dropped dramatically after I got some monitors". That certainly applies to the computer-based setup, poor old HD650. For nighttime listening, my venerable HD590s still do the job very well. (In my bedside setup, they have been complemented by my old 2.1 Cambridge Soundworks PCWorks speakers for a while now, which with a stuffed BR tube aren't half bad for some music while getting up, certainly better than my clock radio, even if this vintage piece is far above average for its kind already.)
post #89 of 172
Thanks sgrossklass! I'm just wondering, what sort of connections are you using for Tascams? Haha, I couldn't find anything when I googled on 'AureDigy 5.1', I'm guessing it's the phonetically similar Creative card you're using ...

Actually, I haven't even looked at how the dip switches are set up, who knows what they did in the shop (ex demo). When I get a better source / cables and set it all up I'll have a look. As it is, they sound very realistic, with excellent clarity but no fatigue. My Dad just got a new laptop and some Logitech R-20 speakers, so I'll ship him my Behringers for a present. Although the Logitechs are surprisingly un-horrible, even my Behringers cane them. I think. They're 1200 kms away at the moment, so hard to remember.

I have seen those new Tascams, but can't find any reviews on them anywhere. I'm glad they released them, because I'm sure it contributed to the great deal I got on my VL-X5s!

It's interesting, after I got my Behringers, my headphone-based listening (at work) increased, because it simply sounded better. Music had a life and a clarity that was lacking. *Sigh* they're good honest 'phones ... very enjoyable.

What are your stands like? I need to buy / build a pair!
post #90 of 172
I currently get by with a set of old Event PS5 monitors, at least until the living situation allows for something better.

I've had a strong desire to hear these speakers since I first saw their brochure, as I've always enjoyed the Tannoy dual-concentric driver:

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