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Linux-fi - Page 2

post #16 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by GAD View Post
I tried that, and it didn't work.

I've been working with Linux since the mid 90s, so I know how it sudo should work.

Again the point is, I should have to go through this. I'm running CentOS and it works just fine.

GAD


That's odd, I'm running a flavor of Ubuntu (Mint) as I type this and it just worked perfectly for me...

Well you have a setup that you're happy with now, so that's what's really important.

Just FYI, Mint gives you the option to create a root account, so if you want to be able to login as root that's another way to go.
post #17 of 68
Several years of linux use here, started with Fedora Core 2 and moved on to a few other things; finally settled on Gentoo about a year ago and using it ever since.
post #18 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bizzel View Post
Kubuntu 7.10 here and eagerly awaiting KDE4, which looks really promising, if a little unstable. I've been using Linux since the late 90s and we use it at work too (IT support) for tools like dd, nessus and wireshark which are invaluable.
I cannot manage to run KDE4 on my Kubuntu box, even with the instructions on the Kubuntu page. Hopefully they'll make available an easy upgrade path by the time KDE4 goes final, or I may consider switching to OpenSuse.
post #19 of 68
How anyone can choose a rpm based system over a deb based I don't understand... We are forced to use some centos machines at work, and some clients request them, and dependency hell happens way too often. apt-get just... works. And if it doesn't, it's usually quite simple to fix it, compared to silly rpms.
You really shouldn't have had a problem creating a root account in ubuntu, although I personally haven't tested in the latest version... sudo -s -H / sudo su - is all I need
post #20 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by martook View Post
How anyone can choose a rpm based system over a deb based I don't understand... We are forced to use some centos machines at work, and some clients request them, and dependency hell happens way too often. apt-get just... works. And if it doesn't, it's usually quite simple to fix it, compared to silly rpms.
The underlying format in which packages and distributed is not that relevant, but the tools on top of that which manage dependecies. You are comparing apples to oranges with rpm/apt comparison.

You should compare apt with urpmi/smart/yum and others that do similiar job. I mostly use urpmi and it does the job quite well.
post #21 of 68
Ubuntu is NOT a server OS. It is a desktop OS for people who want a simpler Linux.

Personally, I use Debian or RedHat on my servers. (Web servers, databases, etc.)

Also, I can't really see how people can use Linux for listening to music...Foobar is just too perfect.
post #22 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by tot View Post
The underlying format in which packages and distributed is not that relevant, but the tools on top of that which manage dependecies. You are comparing apples to oranges with rpm/apt comparison.

You should compare apt with urpmi/smart/yum and others that do similiar job. I mostly use urpmi and it does the job quite well.

Well, ok... I'll compare yum and apt-get then, yum sucks in comparison. Better? :P

Like I said, you can get dependency issues in both systems, but they are usually a hell of a lot easier to solve in debian/ubuntu, not to mention you get a lot less of them, at least in my experience.
post #23 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by OverlordXenu View Post
Ubuntu is NOT a server OS. It is a desktop OS for people who want a simpler Linux.

Personally, I use Debian or RedHat on my servers. (Web servers, databases, etc.)

Also, I can't really see how people can use Linux for listening to music...Foobar is just too perfect.

Ubuntu server is... what? A desktop OS without X?
If you want to use some newer version of applications, Debian kinda sucks, never knowing when it will be updated. Been there, done that, got tired of running apache 1.3 and ancient mysql/php versions. If you want a stable Ubuntu, stick to the LTS versions.

Well, yeah... foobar is an application that would be great to have in Linux, but I feel that amarok is good enough, just wish it could use the great skins for fb2k.
post #24 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by martook View Post
Well, ok... I'll compare yum and apt-get then, yum sucks in comparison. Better?
Much better, thank you..
post #25 of 68
I am running ubuntu 7.10 and 'sudo su' works fine for getting me root

I'd prefer cent os on a server as it doesn't use the latest and greatest but stable proven packages.
post #26 of 68
I run Ubuntu 7.10 on my T23 laptop, for music I usually run Quod Libet, I know everyone loves Amarok, but I just don't want to install all the KDE dependencies just to get one app to work.
post #27 of 68
I'm thinking of making the switch to Linux again. Just gotta back-up my data. -.-

My favorite distro is Arch. Everything just works ...the way you want it to.

I love it.


I used Quod Libet as well Comfortably_numb. Neat app.
post #28 of 68
I asked this in another thread but didn't get much of a response

I am looking for an extreemly bare bones linux distro, pretty much the bare minimun I need to avoid having to bootstrap a compiler (i.e. probably just gcc + kernel + bash). Does such a distro exist? Google isn't helping much because of the distro of the same name.
post #29 of 68
I'll throw in my two cents as well. I started in 1999 with Mandrake, switched to Gentoo and now run Debian/Ubuntu all over. I might be switching to Debian on everything because I am tired of Ubuntu updates breaking things. (I just broke sound upgrading to 7.10.)
post #30 of 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chu View Post
I asked this in another thread but didn't get much of a response

I am looking for an extreemly bare bones linux distro, pretty much the bare minimun I need to avoid having to bootstrap a compiler (i.e. probably just gcc + kernel + bash). Does such a distro exist? Google isn't helping much because of the distro of the same name.
Not sure if this is what your looking for or not, but Ubuntu is making an extremely small install called JeOS, and was designed to run on Virtual Appliances
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