or Connect
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Review: Pioneer SE-DIR1000C Dolby Headphones
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Review: Pioneer SE-DIR1000C Dolby Headphones - Page 12

post #166 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by Toddster
Funny how everyone's tastes are different... And a lot of you audiophile guys really know your stuff...

I really notice only a little echo on DH3, but I am certianly only a fledgling audiophile with a very untrained ear. I like to use DH3 for everything—and I particularily like if for regular stereo Pro-Logic II television broadcasts.

DH3 to me really opens the sound up and makes it appear to fill the whole room (I guess this makes sense considering it was designed to stimulate a theater)...

When I switch over to DH2 or DH1 (which I really dislike), the sound starts to sound very small and headphoney—particularily DH1... The real auditory magic for me is through DH3. But you guys have gotten me more atuned to detail and I want to focus in on the echo factor and how it effects me...

Thanks...!
If you like DH3, you should definitely listen to it in that format. As Duke Ellington said (and has been widely quoted):
If it sounds good -- it is good!
post #167 of 238
One must concider using all three features inorder to find the best one.
post #168 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by sfxjames
John-Se any recommendations for high quality optical cables I could buy? Monster cables sound like great brand to go with.

Which one do you use?




It would seem that DH2 also need some brain burn-in time inorder to get use to the invisible echo especially with dialogue in scenes taking place outdoors. Without the virtual echo the sound would not be given space period. You got to have some echo even in a propperly set-up home theater. You can't just leave it out or you probably have a DH1 experience.

DH2 was set for music as stated by Dolby themselves.
I have been using VAN DENHUL for my dvd's and just got a newer toslink cable brand is "TRANSPARENT"
post #169 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by sfxjames
One must concider using all three features inorder to find the best one.
Your right sfxjames for me I tried DH1 and kinda liked it but after trying DH2 It's better but DH3 not for me in movies but DH3 for music is fine. It really depends on what your ear wants it's like listening to your home theatre speakers first then try the DH so it will suit your preference.
post #170 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by Music Fanatic
You can replace the 1600 milliamp-hour NiMH batteries with higher range batteries. I used 2100 mA-h NiMH, and now there are 2300mA-h NiMH available.
It takes a bit of care of to replace the rechargable batteries. It turns out that if you look closely at the wireless headphone's battery compartment, the recharger is a small springed metal insert on the side about 4/5ths of the way down the holder's body. There is one of these on the left and one of these on the right. This means that standard rechargables won't work. If you look at the included Pioneer NiMH's (which are only 1600 mAh), you'll notice that they have no outer label on the lower third of their body. Most NiMH AA batteries have a label down the entire cylindrical portion of the battery body.

You can solve this problem in several ways -- you can use an external charger to recharge the NiMH, or you can add a conductor to the body, or, mostly simply, you can just cut off the sticker (which for my batteries, was just plastic attached to the battery with no adhesive) for the lower third of the body.

But if you just put plain old NiMH's without preparing the body of the battery, you'll be surprised when the initial charge of the battery suddenly runs out.

By the way, you can find 2300 mAh for only $8.95 for pack of four at Battery Barn. (Charger's are available from the for $16.95, but you may already have a charger or be able to find one cheaper. The chargers come with 4 2000 mAh AA batteries). If you order is over $25, they will ship free in the US by priority mail. Notice that they are in Illinois (for sales tax purposes.)

I think that upgrading to the new battery is worth it, since it will extend the fully charged lifetime of the headphones by 44%. And in any case, after a few hundred charges, NiMH slowly lose their ability to hold a charge, so it is probably worthwhile replacing these every two years or so if you heavily use the headphone.
post #171 of 238
This battery tweak is only for longivety right? or can you improve the power of the amp with higher voltage batteries? or doesnt that exist...

Ive got 4 Varta Photo Accu 2100ma lying around tho I use the supplied batteries for the pioneers..
post #172 of 238
Yes, it only increases the time between charges. Presumably, even with voltage decay, the actual volume doesn't change (although at higher volumes and weak batteries, you'll get clipping and distortion.) But this is just theory. If you want to experiment, put in fresh alkalines (which have higher voltage than NiMHs) and see if you notice a difference in maximum voltage.

By the way, stock NiMH AA batteries are all rated at 1.2 volts, so you can't get higher voltage NiMHs (you'd have to switch to a different composition, such as alkalines.)
post #173 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by Music Fanatic
It takes a bit of care of to replace the rechargable batteries. It turns out that if you look closely at the wireless headphone's battery compartment, the recharger is a small springed metal insert on the side about 4/5ths of the way down the holder's body. There is one of these on the left and one of these on the right. This means that standard rechargables won't work. If you look at the included Pioneer NiMH's (which are only 1600 mAh), you'll notice that they have no outer label on the lower third of their body. Most NiMH AA batteries have a label down the entire cylindrical portion of the battery body.
After thinking about this, the reason for this is pretty obvious -- Pioneer is trying to keep users from accidentally attempting to recharge their Alkaline batteries (which can lead to explosions or fire).
post #174 of 238
Quote:
Music Fantaic said:

"But if you just put plain old NiMH's without preparing the body of the battery, you'll be surprised when the initial charge of the battery suddenly runs out."
Wow, thanks for the great explanation, Music Fantatic... I popped in new, fully charged 1800NiMH batteries on the first day and they lasted for only 10 minutes! I thought WHAT THE HELL... I returned them, and just assumed that the Pioneer batteries that came with the unit were NOT your standard AA NiMH batteries... The Pioneers also seemed a tad longer than all the other AA batteries I have, and wouldn't fit well into my NiMH AA sized charger—I had to literally smash them in, which made me nervous (though they charged just fine).

So If I purchase 2300NiMH batteries and remove the lower third of the sticker, they will operate wonderfully, like the factory Pioneer's do?

Thanks again—wonderful tip and explanation...!
post #175 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by Toddster

So If I purchase 2300NiMH batteries and remove the lower third of the sticker, they will operate wonderfully, like the factory Pioneer's do?

Thanks again—wonderful tip and explanation...!
So it seems. My 2100 mAh are working well since I stripped off the lower third of the label. (The only risk I can think of is if the label was really glued to the NiMH, in which case it might be hard to remove!)

Thanks for your kind words.
post #176 of 238
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally posted by dalida

My only gripe-ette is that sometimes I wish the volume could go a bit louder...
If you switch the little att switch in the back from -8 db to 0 db...it will give the volume a bit of a boost on weaker signals.

Makes a big difference for me on analog television.....I have digital cable, but the lower local channels are only in analog.

John
post #177 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by JMedeiros
If you switch the little att switch in the back from -8 db to 0 db...it will give the volume a bit of a boost on weaker signals.

Makes a big difference for me on analog television.....I have digital cable, but the lower local channels are only in analog.
John, thanks for the advice. Didn't even know it had a att. switch on the back! Will try it tonight.
post #178 of 238
John-SE have you tried messing with the ATT switch on the back of XB-1. Did the bass improve?

I am really close now to getting XB-1. Hopefully the philips arrives by late november if not I will have something in time for christmas season.

John-Se have you ever tried listening to the same effect with your eyes closed? Did it still give the same sonic impression you would get as if you were listening to your normal speakers?
post #179 of 238
Quote:
Originally posted by sfxjames
John-SE have you tried messing with the ATT switch on the back of XB-1. Did the bass improve?

I am really close now to getting XB-1. Hopefully the philips arrives by late november if not I will have something in time for christmas season.

John-Se have you ever tried listening to the same effect with your eyes closed? Did it still give the same sonic impression you would get as if you were listening to your normal speakers?
I haven't tried the ATT switch at the back cause whenever I use the XB-1 on DVD movies I usually cant max the volume it's already loud for me. And the bass was impresive compared to the DIR1000C.

If your going to compare listening with your eyes closed with my actual HT setup my answer will be of course the HT will always have the better sonic impression and staging compared to the XB1. Like from a car or helicopter passing through your back to front speakers. BUT if the imaging will be at the back passing from left to right IT"S great!!! of course we can't compare it to HT setup because of the space it covers from your ear. BUT the XB-1 is DAMMMMNNNN GOOD for me considering that small cans covering just your ear.

The only problem I have is that I connected my XB-1 optical input to my receivers optical out. That means there are no controls from bass to treble, form sound levels and the DELAY options that can be switched from the amp going to the HT speakers. No controls whatsoever. The only thing I can control is the volume of the XB-1 on the headset that's it. But quiet satisfying considering the bass boost that it has.
post #180 of 238
Thank you John-Se

The XB-1 must have a better amplifier.

Anyhow, does the optical tos-link cord supplied really sound that bad compared to the Van Den Hul that you have.

Would you recommend me really have a Van Den Hul tos-link.

I can get a hold of tos-link cables by monster cable but I'd have to order them from internet, perhaps?

Is it worth the trouble?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Headphones (full-size)
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Equipment Forums › Headphones (full-size) › Review: Pioneer SE-DIR1000C Dolby Headphones