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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1141

post #17101 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyfcknp View Post


he could have had any of those, hell he could have had all of them, but a lisp? Blah.

Thanks for clearing that up though.


You really need to be a fan of the old spy genre to see the complexity in the parody through this film. They did a good job of exposition throughout, but still there is a lot of nuance in there that anyone under 40 just isn't going to get.

 

 It succeeds where the original Casino Royale  failed on every single point. Which come to think of it would make a very perverse yet entertaining double feature.

post #17102 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hutnicks View Post


Brotherhood of the Wolf or Irreversible would be better choices to showcase Monica's assets. 

Or "Malena". A good, solid movie.
post #17103 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

Avengers 2 - 5.5/10

80% of the movie is really dull/boring to me. Most of the time it's people standing around trying to act serious about such a dumb storyline. It really feels like this movie is just too filler-filled. As if they were trying to extend the running time. Hey, wait, maybe because they ran out of good ideas years ago at Marvel and just like to waste our time. Once the action starts it just turns into something like a Transformers movie. The comedy is also pretty terrible and not funny. I did find one line pretty funny, but I won't admit which one. Bet you can guess.

Anyway, the movie just dragged on and on and on. I tried to enjoy myself but it was just too hard. I kept getting distracted and was thinking about what other better things I could be doing instead.

I'll admit I don't usually like super hero movies at all. I can't remember the last good one. Maybe "Darkman" or "Spiderman".


The Way - 9/10

Really like this one. One of the slowest movies i've seen in a long time but worth sitting through. Reminds me a little of "Into the Wild".

I'll download it right now if that's the case.
post #17104 of 17114

Shaun the Sheep - 8/10.   Did NOT think I would enjoy this, but damn for what it is, congrats to them.

 

 

The DUFF - 3/10.  Decent chicks, stupid movie.

 

 

Adult Beginners - 6/10.  Kroll is funny, I always get excited when I see Rafi from the league in any movie so that was a bonus.

post #17105 of 17114

The Island ( Ostrov, 2006) 9/10

 

The closest and strongest competitor to Stalker of Tarkovsky

 

 

There is probably no other film which is so close thematically and artistically to Tarkovsky's Stalker. I would say that Stalker and The Island are a perfect match to each other complementing to the same theme of a god's fool.

post #17106 of 17114

The Sheriff                               7/10  Entertaining Nordic Crime drama that tries a little too hard to be their answer to The Usual Suspects.  Watchable but some pretty thin character development makes the film suffer.

post #17107 of 17114

Rosewater (2014): 7/10

 

Jon Stewart's directorial debut (I think). Not too shabby. Pretty by-the-numbers, but well-acted.

post #17108 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

The Island ( Ostrov, 2006) 9/10

 

The closest and strongest competitor to Stalker of Tarkovsky

 

There is probably no other film which is so close thematically and artistically to Tarkovsky's Stalker. I would say that Stalker and The Island are a perfect match to each other complementing to the same theme of a god's fool.

 

Hmm, now I'm interested.

post #17109 of 17114

Seven Samurai (1954) - 8,5

 

Japan, Sengoku period.

 

Theft of values, theft of life, theft of happiness and pride. Oppressive suffering haunts a small village of farmers. Suffering perpetrated by vultures of greed whose next attack, the farmers profess, will sentence the village extinct. What can be done? Everything that follows stems from the instinct of survival. Instinct camouflaged in delusions of honor, justice, altruism and bravery. Instinct fed by fear, despair and love. Thus begins the existential crusade to preserve the dearest and most precious human virtues in a cruel and amoral world.

 

Appeals for the samurai conduct warrant provisions for the battle ahead. But the only distinction between a samurai and a non-samurai is one's mask: the world we invent for ourselves is only a disguise for our fears and denials. A farce that falls apart when heroism meets life's ungratefulness and the harsh truth becomes inescapable: all men are slaves of their mortality in the struggle for survival, samurai or not. Death is oblivious to our titles and dilemmas. But when death strikes, only those who seek to outlive fate are caught off guard. They will never know ephemeral happiness, for life is unforgiving of one's mistakes. Living it humbly is the only way to die undefeated.

 

A single negative remark: considerable length and slow progression may lead to boredom and distraction. Particularly during the first half where all main characters are slowly introduced. This is heightened by the fact that Kurosawa's cinema may not be particularly easy to chew for some: rewards aren't immediately apparent to viewers, and his movies may even appear aesthetically insipid or plain. Digging below the surface, however, reveals a very different truth. Seven Samurai overflows with beauty and genius subverted between the lines of the cinematic composition. The ability to effortlessly engage and entertain speaks volumes about the amount of thought invested in each take. Almost every sequence was crafted with sculptor's fastidiousness, and the result is near perfect symbiosis between form and function - one of Kurosawa's greatest gifts. Highly recommended!

 

Blog review.

post #17110 of 17114

City of God: 9/10 foreign action movie. If you haven't seen it, it is on Netflix. A dark and gritty movie set in the slums of Rio, you follow the story of a boy as he grows up and tries to avoid getting caught up in the gang violence.

post #17111 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Seven Samurai (1954) - 8,5

 

This is heightened by the fact that Kurosawa's cinema may not be particularly easy to chew for some: rewards aren't immediately apparent to viewers, and his movies may even appear aesthetically insipid or plain. Digging below the surface, however, reveals a very different truth. Seven Samurai overflows with beauty and genius subverted between the lines of the cinematic composition. The ability to effortlessly engage and entertain speaks volumes about the amount of thought invested in each take. Almost every sequence was crafted with sculptor's fastidiousness, and the result is near perfect symbiosis between form and function - one of Kurosawa's greatest gifts. Highly recommended!

 

That's the magic of Kurosawa and his cinematographers; the shots and screen compositions in his films are frequently technically perfect, but invisibly so. He does not let the camera nor the men behind it get in the way of what's actually unfolding on the screen. It's only when you stop and really pay attention to some of his shots (the extended forester tracking shot in Rashomon, the near street-clashes between gangs in Yojimbo, the clotheslines and well shots in Red Beard) that you realize just how difficult they must have been to achieve. The technical proficiency and sheer tenacity of the great Japanese directors (Ozu and Mizoguchi additionally and especially spring to mind) cannot be understated--in some ways I feel like everyone else is still trying to catch up, years later. Very little in their films calls undue attention to itself unless absolutely necessary, no matter how much work went into constructing the elements in question. Hence, nothing looks out of place, or rather, everything looks authentic, and spaces maintain logical consistency. The films attain a familiarity (sometimes in spite of their epic scope) to the audience that more films would do well to emulate. (Perhaps my favorite non-Japanese example is Luchino Visconti's The Leopard.) This is not to say that every film director ought to study and ape the mannered approach to filmmaking that Kurosawa employed so skillfully--while it predates Kurosawa's best work by a few decades, what would The Passion of Joan of Arc be without its famously disorienting close-ups, where 'rules' of perspective and visual context are almost entirely thrown out?

 

Thanks for the write-up kkl, seems like it's been a while! 


Edited by metalsonata - Yesterday at 3:54 pm
post #17112 of 17114
Get Hard - 6/10 funny moments, but nothing special.
post #17113 of 17114
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

That's the magic of Kurosawa and his cinematographers; the shots and screen compositions in his films are frequently technically perfect, but invisibly so. He does not let the camera nor the men behind it get in the way of what's actually unfolding on the screen. It's only when you stop and really pay attention to some of his shots (the extended forester tracking shot in Rashomon, the near street-clashes between gangs in Yojimbo, the clotheslines and well shots in Red Beard) that you realize just how difficult they must have been to achieve. The technical proficiency and sheer tenacity of the great Japanese directors (Ozu and Mizoguchi additionally and especially spring to mind) cannot be understated--in some ways I feel like everyone else is still trying to catch up, years later. Very little in their films calls undue attention to itself unless absolutely necessary, no matter how much work went into constructing the elements in question. Hence, nothing looks out of place, or rather, everything looks authentic, and spaces maintain logical consistency. The films attain a familiarity (sometimes in spite of their epic scope) to the audience that more films would do well to emulate. (Perhaps my favorite non-Japanese example is Luchino Visconti's The Leopard.) This is not to say that every film director ought to study and ape the mannered approach to filmmaking that Kurosawa employed so skillfully--while it predates Kurosawa's best work by a few decades, what would The Passion of Joan of Arc be without its famously disorienting close-ups, where 'rules' of perspective and visual context are almost entirely thrown out?

 

Thanks for the write-up kkl, seems like it's been a while! 

 

I very much like the way you put this into words, metalsonata. I would further venture to assert that some of the qualities you point out here are hallmarks of any great work of cinema. Approaches, paradigms or styles may differ, but the end result is an authentic and irreducible logical whole. Devoid of redundancy. It's fully worthwhile to watch these masterpieces humbly because there is much to learn!

 

Yes, it's been while. Haven't written movie reviews for months, so I'm trying to catch up with it again. Glad you took something out of my write-up, thanks for reading.


Edited by kkl10 - Today at 9:58 am
post #17114 of 17114
Dersu Uzala ( 1975, Akira Kurosawa) 8/10
 
Recently I was bashing a new Russian film called The Territory ( 2015) because of its tediousness, pro-Soviet revisionist pathos, lack of a nerve and personal Putin's involvement. 
 
 
Unfortunately I was a bit struggling watching Dersu Usala and found it dry and underwhelming. Involvement of a popular Soviet actor Yuri Solomin as a captain didn't help. On IMDB it says:
 
Quote:
 This film was made when a member of the Russian embassy contacted Akira Kurosawa, asking him to make a Russian film for Russians, being that television hadn't grown yet in the USSR and that Russia lacked, according to the ambassador, good writers and directors for films.

 

That is weird because there was a Soviet film Dersu Uzala shot in 1961. Even more Soviets at that time had shot several films on similar themes. 

 

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