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post #15781 of 16035

EoT is really a good film. I'd have to say it suffers from the Cruise effect here. They sacrificed the female character so you can have MORE Major TOM. Conceptually it really works well. The time jumps are done with a really clever theatrical device and the director really gets a huge nod for thinking this one up.

There is some really derivative special effects here as well as some downright pokes in the ribs and homage to films (and directors) past.

Stylistically this is as close as Tom will probably get to doing a Christopher Nolan film. Some parts of it are that smart. Some of the major plot issues have been made a little too simplistic though. If you read the novella this was based on you wont be terribly pleased. As a SciFi Actioner though, it works quite well. It's the film Matt Damon should have made instead of that visual abortion Elysium.

post #15782 of 16035

Godzilla sucked hardcore plot wise.

 

Every individual scene was a masterfully crafted vignette, but the characters were cookie cutter and the story was horribly separated into the individual scenes with no story arc to hold it together.

 

The main character decided not to take advantage of his only chance to explain why he's the main character in the last scene.

post #15783 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

The Mirror (1975) - 9

 

Hauntingly hermetic movie. Several plots and historical archives entangled in a jigsaw puzzle. All the events appear to revolve around one object whose identity is unclear. Maybe it's the prominent woman, or maybe the man whose voice interacts with the woman and other characters throughout the film. Dialogues point to personal and familial ordeals of the seemingly main character couple. The desultory narrative is fascinating, but what truly haunts me is the visual experience. This aspect is particularly noteworthy; as if Tarkovsky intended to lure the viewers with sheer contrasts and movements of striking imagery intertwined in fluid disorder. The picture is highly poetic; quality imparted by the wonderful cinematography (both color and B&W) and sensible camera work. The sound design, with excellent music, enhances the visual cunning. The cinematic experience is a multifaceted treasure; a narrative puzzle infused in a scenic sculpture that occasionally recalls to video art. There are nostalgic scenes, inspiring scenes, impenetrable scenes, and even scenes that evoke the cinematic styles of Bergman and Antonioni. Postmodern cinema in all its splendor. The only drawback, in my opinion, are the rare moments when Tarkovsky seems so impressed with his own artifice that he drags it into a redundancy skimming the ludicrous. Although minimal, these overboard moments inconveniently carry my attention towards the artificiality of the work, distracting as a result. If not for these immersion glitches, I would certainly rate The Mirror a perfect 10. Yet another masterpiece that lures me to a waking dream. So far, Tarkovsky's films have caused me a deep impression, and The Mirror is no exception; it's an amazing experience that keeps haunting me days after. I love it and I think every cinephile should give it a try!

Noice! I love Tarkovsky, but his pacing is occasionally... slowwwwwwww

But yeah, I'll give that a watch - heard it was his most inaccessible yet lol

post #15784 of 16035

Edge of Tomorrow (2014): 8/10

 

Edge of Tomorrow has a lot of things going against it; its awful title is just the beginning. Someone also forgot to grace it with a satisfactory ending (what we're left with is what feels like the first draft of one), it stars Tom Cruise in Yet Another Special Effects-Laden Sci-Fi Movie, and, like nearly all time-travel sci-fi, its plot is less an air tight container and more a sieve.

Nonetheless, this film is an immense piece of entertainment. It won't blow your mind, but I'd be hard-pressed to imagine that anyone with a taste for popcorn blockbusters won't love the time they spend with this one. It hits most of the right notes, but particularly excels in the realm of black comedy. (A turn I was surprised by!) Cruise puts his star power to great use here, and the potentially miscast as a super-soldier extraordinaire Emily Blunt exudes considerable presence--she is, as I have suspected since Looper, more than just a pretty face. Recommended.

post #15785 of 16035
The Edge of Tomorrow is loosely based on an excellent book, called "All You Need Is Kill" by Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Of course, the fact that I loved the book means that I probably won't see the movie - at least not until it comes to Netflix. I've been burned too many times by Sci-Fi movies that are based on excellent books.
post #15786 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

The Edge of Tomorrow is loosely based on an excellent book, called "All You Need Is Kill" by Hiroshi Sakurazaka. Of course, the fact that I loved the book means that I probably won't see the movie - at least not until it comes to Netflix. I've been burned too many times by Sci-Fi movies that are based on excellent books.


If you read the book and are looking for a filmed version of it, this won't do at all. It takes about as much from the book as Under The Skin does.You need to approach this as if you were going to see The Matrix for the first time. It's entertainment with a concept derived from a book. Thats all.

post #15787 of 16035
BTW, to the previous poster that complained that X-Men stole the name "Sentinel" from the Matrix - umm - no - it's the other way round. Sentinels have been in the Marvel universe since their first appearance in X-Men #14 in 1965.

post #15788 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

BTW, to the previous poster that complained that X-Men stole the name "Sentinel" from the Matrix - umm - no - it's the other way round. Sentinels have been in the Marvel universe since their first appearance in X-Men #14 in 1965.

WOOT WOOT

 

thank you for that,

 

also I watched 

 

Edge of Tommorow 7.5/10

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
ending sucked, a big ole RE BOOT YAY... I mean it wasn't too bad an ending but... meh
 
other than that I did enjoy the movie 
post #15789 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by billybob_jcv View Post

BTW, to the previous poster that complained that X-Men stole the name "Sentinel" from the Matrix - umm - no - it's the other way round. Sentinels have been in the Marvel universe since their first appearance in X-Men #14 in 1965.

 

Reading is fundamental.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) 5/10

 

(maybe the name is from the comic?)

 

The whole I've got someone's mind in another place in time and we're being attacked and it's literally moments before they get us and the sentinels are stopped in time is a Matrix rip off by the way.


Edited by fractus2 - 6/8/14 at 8:58am
post #15790 of 16035

Yojimbo (1961) - 8,5

 

1860, Japan. A small city divided by the ferocious rivalry between two criminal gangs that fight for its control. The arrival of a ronin (a lordless samurai) sets forward a new order of events. Obscure reasons propel the warrior to join the conflict; a seemingly reckless decision that is soon offset by his astuteness and deathly ability with the sword. The nameless man, nicely played by Toshiro Mifune, makes marionettes of both parties of the rivalry in a machination set forward by himself. Power manipulation, swindles and righteous bravery in the face of setbacks culminate in the extinction of both gangs and the final resumption of peace in the city. The hero departs after his duty is fulfilled. Yojimbo is considered a major influence for the following western cinema; this probably explains the déjà vu feeling I experienced at the end of the film - I felt as if I had watched a western where the only thing missing was Clint Eastwood playing the lone wolf. I will say, however, that Yojimbo satisfies me in ways that no spaghetti western has ever matched. A lone vigilante who arrives to clean the city corrupted by criminals; the classic plot is polished to near perfection in this film. Raw and appealing aesthetics, rich and well-acted characters, perfect transitions between comedy, drama, action and suspense as we follow the lone samurai crafting his web. It becomes a natural reaction to sympathize with the hero, and, in the end, I am fully satisfied by the entertaining cinematic experience itself and by the culmination of the events. Moreover, this is another great cinematic example of perfect symbiosis between form and substance; a feat only within reach of great masters like Akira Kurosawa. This is masterful and very well-rounded filmmaking. Fun, thrilling and ultimately awe-inspiring, Yojimbo is excellent entertainment with no distractions. Great movie, highly recommended!

 

 

 

post #15791 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Yojimbo (1961) - 8,5

 

1860, Japan. A small city divided by the ferocious rivalry between two criminal gangs that fight for its control. The arrival of a ronin (a lordless samurai) sets forward a new order of events. Obscure reasons propel the warrior to join the conflict; a seemingly reckless decision that is soon offset by his astuteness and deathly ability with the sword. The nameless man, nicely played by Toshiro Mifune, makes marionettes of both parties of the rivalry in a machination set forward by himself. Power manipulation, swindles and righteous bravery in the face of setbacks culminate in the extinction of both gangs and the final resumption of peace in the city. The hero departs after his duty is fulfilled. Yojimbo is considered a major influence for the following western cinema; this probably explains the déjà vu feeling I experienced at the end of the film - I felt as if I had watched a western where the only thing missing was Clint Eastwood playing the lone wolf. I will say, however, that Yojimbo satisfies me in ways that no spaghetti western has ever matched. A lone vigilante who arrives to clean the city corrupted by criminals; the classic plot is polished to near perfection in this film. Raw and appealing aesthetics, rich and well-acted characters, perfect transitions between comedy, drama, action and suspense as we follow the lone samurai crafting his web. It becomes a natural reaction to sympathize with the hero, and, in the end, I am fully satisfied by the entertaining cinematic experience itself and by the culmination of the events. Moreover, this is another great cinematic example of perfect symbiosis between form and substance; a feat only within reach of great masters like Akira Kurosawa. This is masterful and very well-rounded filmmaking. Fun, thrilling and ultimately awe-inspiring, Yojimbo is excellent entertainment with no distractions. Great movie, highly recommended!

 

 

 

 

 

I think it also features some of Kurosawa's most perfect shots--and that's saying something. I believe the primary cinematographer was Kazuo Miyagawa, who worked on films like Rashomon, Ugetsu, and Sansho the Baliff--all must number among the most beautiful films I've ever seen.

post #15792 of 16035

I read the description of this on Netflix and it really sounded pretty uneventful. Not to minimize the idea of someone trying to clear their name, but c'mon, above all else we watch movies for entertainment, right? Anyway, I gave it a shot and it ended up being a situation where the simple description didn't do the story justice whatsoever. The way I viewed the main character changed quite a lot by the end of the film and there is an aspect to the story that sets it apart from other offerings in this genre of documentary. 

 

 

An Unreal Dream: The Michael Morton Story - 8.5/10

 

 

post #15793 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

Edge of Tomorrow - 9.25/10

 

Yeah, I would've given it 9 just for entertaining factor alone, in which there is something very satisfactory. Pretty often when I watch a sci-fi movie, though entertained, I can't answer whether I really enjoyed it or not.

 

Chef ( 2014) 8/10

 

Feel good family movie with an attractive and popular food theme ( a lot of people lately are into cooking as a hobby).


Edited by mutabor - 6/11/14 at 11:29am
post #15794 of 16035

Her - 10/10

 

Totally not expecting it to be this good. I was kind of blown away by it and I think if I gave it a full review it'd be 10 pages and might require a few viewings. If I had made this myself I might have not changed a thing. Maybe the whole "surrogate" scene (and the actresses overacting). It actually was kind of funny too at times. I wish they could have held back on the swearing because it could have easily been PG-13 with a few cuts (that would not ruin anything). Loved the slower style of the movie. Felt like the whole movie I was just engrossed in their conversations and not so much anything else. Kind of a weird experience. It's also a tad creepy and a little sad. I wonder how people will view this in the year 2050!

 

FYI my favorites in the last 6 months have been "Railway Man" "Philomena", "Captain Philips" and "Like Father, Like Son". This might be in with them and I enjoyed it more than the rest. Oh and "12 Years a Slave" was great, but I can't say I enjoyed it.

post #15795 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

Her - 10/10

Totally not expecting it to be this good. I was kind of blown away by it and I think if I gave it a full review it'd be 10 pages and might require a few viewings. If I had made this myself I might have not changed a thing. Maybe the whole "surrogate" scene (and the actresses overacting). It actually was kind of funny too at times. I wish they could have held back on the swearing because it could have easily been PG-13 with a few cuts (that would not ruin anything). Loved the slower style of the movie. Felt like the whole movie I was just engrossed in their conversations and not so much anything else. Kind of a weird experience. It's also a tad creepy and a little sad. I wonder how people will view this in the year 2050!

FYI my favorites in the last 6 months have been "Railway Man" "Philomena", "Captain Philips" and "Like Father, Like Son". This might be in with them and I enjoyed it more than the rest. Oh and "12 Years a Slave" was great, but I can't say I enjoyed it.
Oh yeah I enjoyed it greatly, I kind of want to watch it again now, some of the scenes were just gorgeous.
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