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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1044

post #15646 of 19947

Amazing Spider Man 2 - 6/10

 

I wonder when i'll actually see a super hero movie I love? Seems impossible.

Now that I think of it, I liked the original "Batman" but not so much the latest ones.

 

BTW do you remember "Darkman"? I need to watch that again.

post #15647 of 19947
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post
 

Amazing Spider Man 2 - 6/10

 

I wonder when i'll actually see a super hero movie I love? Seems impossible.

Now that I think of it, I liked the original "Batman" but not so much the latest ones.

 

BTW do you remember "Darkman"? I need to watch that again.


Just wait for Ben Asspicks rendition:rolleyes:

 

Not a film but the best treatment I've seen to date was Swedens Der Drabbade which has not to my knowledge been released in English. It was the miniseries that "Heroes" was stolen from.

post #15648 of 19947

The Lives of Others (2006) 8/10

 

I give it 4 out of 5 stars / 80%. A few nice twists in the plot, I enjoyed the hell out of this film. In the middle of the film, when the small boy's ball bounces into the elevator and he follows it in, kind of reminding me the The Third Man when the kids ball rolls into Harry Lime's room when Holly and Anna and the Porter where in it, and the Stasi agent asks the boy "What is the name of your....." Edge of your seat stuff.

post #15649 of 19947

6/10 - Warm Bodies.  Interesting twist about zombies. Cute movie with clichés of Romeo and Juliet throughout.  Rob Corddry forces out chuckles here and there as most of his movies do.  A good movie to score points on a date.

post #15650 of 19947

Trouble Every Day - 8.5

 

While not as masterfully told as her dazzling and mysterious L'Intrus, Denis's take on the horror genre applies her fascination with the texture of human skin to its most logical point, as it serves as our view into the two characters' lust for human blood (or flesh?).  There are some unforgettable and haunting images (one of which makes blood just as beautiful as it is horrifying).  Beatrice Dalle gives a ferocious performance while Vincent Gallo is quite good as the self-tortured anti-hero.  

 

July Rhapsody - 9

 

The basic plot reminded me of Jacques Demy's Lola, however the characters are so much more real and fleshed out here.  While on paper the story might not be anything special, the pacing and the way each character is subtly portrayed and with the use of poetry ties all the elements together to make a hell of a moving film.  It also helped that the main actors all did flawless jobs with their roles.

post #15651 of 19947

The Sacrifice (1986) 8.75

Requiem for a Dream (2000) 8.25

The Lives of Others (2006) 8

The Wicker Man (1973) 8

The Thing (1982) 8.25

Let the Fire Burn (2013) 8

River of Grass (1994) 8.5

L'Elisse (1962) 8.5

Sexy Beast (2001) 8.3

Collapse (2009) 7.5

Thief (1981) 8

Blow-up (1966) 8.5

Birth (2004) 8.25

The Passenger (1975) 8.5

Les Vacances De M. Hulot (1953) 8.25

Rounders (1998) 8

Odd Thomas (2013) 6.8

post #15652 of 19947

Moonrise Kingdom (2012) - 8

 

During my childhood and early adolescence, I had the privilege to own an incredible aptitude for dreaminess. It was common to find myself daydreaming with riveting places, landscapes, people or music which made me outburst with feelings or emotions so different from everything else that I still don't know if there are words able to describe them. Those daydreams were the stage of the deepest love fantasies of my early adolescence. As I grew older, this aptitude weakened progressively and today my mind is so gripped to reality that I cannot disconnect and feel the blaze of other worlds anymore. Nowadays, I am blessed with such visceral experiences only, and by rare luck, during sleep. Unfortunately, I forget most dreams. Cinema and music are the only escapes able to relieve me from the absence of my childhood reveries, but, try as they might, the experiences they offer are rarely close to be as visceral and unique as those that my mind can induce myself into. Moonrise Kingdom is far from being such visceral experience, but it leaves me with faint nostalgia because the story portrayed features the same kind of platonic young love affair that I fantasized in my early adolescent digressions: a love adventure tale in a wistfully beautiful and stormy landscape. So far, this is my favorite Wes Anderson movie, it's the only one that graces me with a cinematic experience that comes remotely close to transfigure into a waking dream. I also think this is the most powerful expression of the oblique quality that distinguishes his movies from the others.

 

The offbeat pathos is apparent in the aesthetic polish and narrative sophistication of Moonrise Kingdom. Here is yet another fine example of Wes Anderson's predilection to whimsically deliberate his characters' behavioral profiles. The youths are the main characters in this story and are endowed with obvious adultlike mannerisms, the acting is not exemplary, but this actually adds to the charm and funniness of the young characters. One more time, I perceived a tendency to dissect an almost intangible quality from some human subjects, Sam Shakusky and Suzy Bishop don't seem to be absolutely inserted in who they are (supposed to be), their manners are not as raw and settled as reality would demand. Their personalities seem to balance precariously on a tightrope at the limit of their elusive definition, just like appears to be the case with other subjects in The Royal Tenenbaums and Rushmore. But it is unreasonable to ask for such accomplished acting from kids or teenagers without any prior acting skills, so either this young couple of actors is monumentally talented or Wes Anderson is an expert at the art of crafting his characters by using actors as mere tools. Or maybe this fleeting and almost intangible quality I'm drooling about is nothing more than an illusion or wishful thinking of mine... and, in part, it probably is.

 

The wonderfully crafted cinematography and soundtrack enhance the dreamlike quality of the experience and contribute to forge different moods throughout the movie. Wes Anderson always reveals great musical taste in his movies, a quality I highly appreciate. The script and editing work are typically excellent and the camera work may be the most formal I've seen from Wes until now. Distractions come down to some poorly camouflaged CGI effects and little else. Once more, the story has a happy ending for the protagonists and yet again, the movie is more than just the story. In Moonrise Kingdom, more than the other Wes' works I've seen, the style itself adds to the substance and owns part of the appeal of the movie. Moonrise Kingdom is very easy to be enjoyed as a visceral, exciting and fun cinematic experience. I don't find it as hilarious as Rushmore, but I see it as a natural evolution of Wes Anderson's cinematic style. Wonderful movie, highly recommended!


Edited by kkl10 - 5/18/14 at 8:56am
post #15653 of 19947
2/Duo - 8/10

A shoe-string budget film, shot mostly in a cramped Japanese apartment and about the deteriorating relationship between a young couple - a struggling actor freeloading on his saleswoman girlfriend. The script was throw out like week-old sushi before the shooting, so most of the dialogue is improvised. This also gives the acting a more raw and intense quality with its awkward stretches of silence during dialogues. The story and the improvisation immediatedly reminded me of Rivette's L'Amour Fou, and not surprisingly Suwa was inspired by Rivette when he made this. In additiion to the main narrative there are several scenes when the director Suwa from off screen interviews both characters as if he was filming a documentary at the same time.
post #15654 of 19947
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

The Sacrifice (1986) 8.75

 

9

post #15655 of 19947
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

The Sacrifice (1986) 8.75

Requiem for a Dream (2000) 8.25

The Lives of Others (2006) 8

The Wicker Man (1973) 8

The Thing (1982) 8.25

Let the Fire Burn (2013) 8

River of Grass (1994) 8.5

L'Elisse (1962) 8.5

Sexy Beast (2001) 8.3

Collapse (2009) 7.5

Thief (1981) 8

Blow-up (1966) 8.5

Birth (2004) 8.25

The Passenger (1975) 8.5

Les Vacances De M. Hulot (1953) 8.25

Rounders (1998) 8

Odd Thomas (2013) 6.8

 

I may have been to harsh with The Wicker Man. I've been thinking about raising my rating a bit, although I can't say I enjoyed it much...

post #15656 of 19947

Mel Gibson on the right at Cannes 2014 :duggfloat:

 

Atom Egoyan's The Captive was panned.

 


Edited by mutabor - 5/18/14 at 3:14pm
post #15657 of 19947
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

 

I may have been to harsh with The Wicker Man. I've been thinking about raising my rating a bit, although I can't say I enjoyed it much...

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
First I think folks need to be into that style of movie to rate it higher. I'm a fan of all those American International 1970s movies so I was in from the get go. I was also stupid enough to not figure out the star would be captured. Some times a lower IQ is entertaining. Still I would rate it higher just because of stuff like plot, photography and acting. IMO
post #15658 of 19947
Godzilla 6/10. Bleh, boring, the Godzilla is fat and SLOW ...
post #15659 of 19947
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedBull View Post

Godzilla 6/10. Bleh, boring, the Godzilla is fat and SLOW ...


Ah bigger the hype, badder the film.

 

The best Godzilla remake ever is still Cloverfield:D

post #15660 of 19947
I like the previous one tho. Quite realistic and tactile, just like how a lizard move. This one is moves like 1970 Ultraman vs Godzilla where there's a man inside the suit, well, not that, a bit exaggerated biggrin.gif
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