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post #15631 of 16041

"Escape Plan" (Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jim Caviezel) -- 8/10. I liked this movie a lot, and for a couple of badass seniors, well, that was pretty badass.

 

"Last Vegas" (Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, Robert DeNiro, Kevin Kline) -- 9/10. Though it's basically The Hangover (only saw Hangover 3) with senior citizens (veterans at that), I loved it.

post #15632 of 16041
THE GAME(Michael Douglas, Sean Penn, Deborah Kara Unger) 7.5/10 very gripping, never ending suspence.
post #15633 of 16041

H.R. Giger (one of the primary designers for the film Alien) died yesterday: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/h-r-giger-surrealist-artist-and-alien-designer-dead-at-74-20140513

 

I'm no art aficionado, but in my opinion, Giger was one of the best visual artists of our times. Ever since I was introduced to him at a young age I've felt strongly connected to his work, which now seems to me to be a natural progression from artists like Bosch and Dali, and which are powerfully related to the grim works of Beksiński. His imagery typically involved flesh and mechanics melded together in horrific, fetishistic ways. Sex, procreation, penetration, religion, and deformation were frequent concerns in his work, as was the ever-encroaching dark. I'm still not certain as to why I remain so drawn to his art--I think it's probably because of how unsafe it is. I see no compromise in him, and very little beauty. He painted with shadow, and his best work was pregnant with breathless horror. But it was also incredibly enticing. I wanted to know what his imagined landscapes felt like under my feet. I wanted to hear what his beautiful, tortured Li would say to those who were willing to listen. Like Lovecraft before him, he breathed vibrant life into horror--but also like Lovecraft before him, his work has become so ingrained into the popular culture that people now look over it without batting an eye. Cthulhu has been reduced to stuffed animals and t-shirts, as has Giger's xenomorph.

 

Do the man a favor. Separate yourself from your friends and family for an evening, turn off the lights, and get your hands on a copy of Ridley Scott's 1979 Alien. Its fleshy, psychosexual horror has never been equaled, and decades of increasingly bad sequels have not lessened the impact of the original film, no matter how much you think they have. And spare a thought, if you can, for the man from whose imagination this beast sprung, and for his family and the people that loved him. Giger was haunted as a child by a nightmare about thin stairs that descended into terminal blackness. I think he's been descending those stairs for his whole life, and reporting his findings back to us. Now he's reached the bottom--and the rest of us aren't too far behind him.

post #15634 of 16041

Robocop 2014 surprisingly good  8/10

 

Hobbit Smaugs desolation 7/10. Honestly it´s just for the production value Smaug is so well done and I loved the seatown that looked like a carbon copy of Riften. I don´t share PJs dwarf humour and it just aren´t anything special.

That scene where they got to the mountain and the hidden door was so stupid it just made no sense why they acted like they did. Spend the months tracking to get there and no we don´t want to be here let´s go.

post #15635 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by oqvist View Post

Hobbit Smaugs desolation 7/10. Honestly it´s just for the production value Smaug is so well done and I loved the seatown that looked like a carbon copy of Riften. I don´t share PJs dwarf humour and it just aren´t anything special.


That scene where they got to the mountain and the hidden door was so stupid it just made no sense why they acted like they did. Spend the months tracking to get there and no we don´t want to be here let´s go.


 



I just watched that this weekend as well. It was far too long for the amount of actual "important" content there was. There were several scenes they could have cut out and the story wouldn't have suffered at all from it.
post #15636 of 16041

Rushmore (1998) - 8

 

Work that precedes The Royal Tenenbaums which shares significant DNA. Rushmore is a comedy largely supported by the ridiculously adult and smug ethos of Max Fischer. A 15-year-old boy without the slightest notion of proportionality supposed to measure the ways of a teenager in his age when getting along with other people. He treats old-timers and youths as if they were all his equals, endowed with fearless bravura and propelled by his creative and enterprising wits. His hyperbolic character leads him to casually spark a friendship with a much older industrial man who builds admiration for the boy's pseudo-adult attitude. Both of them eventually find their hearts beating for the same woman, a beautiful teacher in Rushmore school, where Max... doesn't study. Each one will try to win the teacher's love in his own way and naturally the romantic mechanics between a bold 15-year-old boy and a woman with the competition of an even older man mixed in is a recipe for bizarre and hilarious situations throughout. I enjoyed very much the theater play scenes, they gave another quality and vitality to Rushmore. In a way, those scenes highlighted the evidence that there's a clear contrast between what can be real and what cannot, the difference between reality and fiction. Reality is not utopian like fiction, nothing happens out of pure will. Anything demands effort, patience and sense of proportionality. Everything comes in its right time and has its own place. A lesson that young Max Fischer has learned by the end of the film.

 

Wes Anderson likes to fantasize with people, seems like he is trying to capture some precious unobtainium underlying human relations and psyche. He plays with personal and social limits. There's usually a somewhat eccentric character, or group of characters, who have to endure through ordeals to reach the desired goal or redemption. Personal development is a common theme in Wes Cinema. Prominent attention is given to small gestures, either manifestations of affection or contempt. Younger people are an important part of the social mechanics and adults can't get away from giving satisfactions to youths when these so demand. In fact, children have almost adultlike maturity and social skill. This particular point is source of great amusement for me, but it's subtle. Max Fischer is that taken to the limit. So far, Wes movies have left me with the feeling of a bittersweet spell hovering over all human relations. They're sweet movies in an unreal way, but although it's artificially crafted sweetness, it feels natural and organic. Everything flows coherently in a mannerist way. The acting could be better, but it's not too distracting. Rushmore is smartly written, technically flawless, engaging, emotionally powerful and super fun! I burst into laughter on almost regular basis, I love the way how Wes constantly throws in snippets of humor to keep a smile on my face. Flavored and tasty Cinema. Wonderful cinematography and Olivia Williams is a goddess! I enjoyed Rushmore very much. Recommended!


Edited by kkl10 - 5/13/14 at 3:07pm
post #15637 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

H.R. Giger (one of the primary designers for the film Alien) died yesterday: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/h-r-giger-surrealist-artist-and-alien-designer-dead-at-74-20140513

 

I'm no art aficionado, but in my opinion, Giger was one of the best visual artists of our times. Ever since I was introduced to him at a young age I've felt strongly connected to his work, which now seems to me to be a natural progression from artists like Bosch and Dali, and which are powerfully related to the grim works of Beksiński. His imagery typically involved flesh and mechanics melded together in horrific, fetishistic ways. Sex, procreation, penetration, religion, and deformation were frequent concerns in his work, as was the ever-encroaching dark. I'm still not certain as to why I remain so drawn to his art--I think it's probably because of how unsafe it is. I see no compromise in him, and very little beauty. He painted with shadow, and his best work was pregnant with breathless horror. But it was also incredibly enticing. I wanted to know what his imagined landscapes felt like under my feet. I wanted to hear what his beautiful, tortured Li would say to those who were willing to listen. Like Lovecraft before him, he breathed vibrant life into horror--but also like Lovecraft before him, his work has become so ingrained into the popular culture that people now look over it without batting an eye. Cthulhu has been reduced to stuffed animals and t-shirts, as has Giger's xenomorph.

 

Do the man a favor. Separate yourself from your friends and family for an evening, turn off the lights, and get your hands on a copy of Ridley Scott's 1979 Alien. Its fleshy, psychosexual horror has never been equaled, and decades of increasingly bad sequels have not lessened the impact of the original film, no matter how much you think they have. And spare a thought, if you can, for the man from whose imagination this beast sprung, and for his family and the people that loved him. Giger was haunted as a child by a nightmare about thin stairs that descended into terminal blackness. I think he's been descending those stairs for his whole life, and reporting his findings back to us. Now he's reached the bottom--and the rest of us aren't too far behind him.

 

May H. R. Giger rest in peace.

I don't know much of his work besides the xenomorph creature which I do happen to admire. It's so strange and fascinating. It could only have come from a darkly creative mind.


Edited by kkl10 - 5/13/14 at 2:09pm
post #15638 of 16041

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-dOvOanErPQ]

 

Air Disasters - Under Pressure  8/10

 

"So as soon as this aircraft took off, there was basically no surviving."

post #15639 of 16041

 

The new Blu Ray release of Friedkin's SORCERER !!!

 

Rating: 9/10

 

Awesome flick, highly recommended. Would have been a 10 except for NO special features :( which I cannot understand at all since Friedkin was heavily involved in this release. Everything else was spectacular.

post #15640 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkalra67 View Post

THE GAME(Michael Douglas, Sean Penn, Deborah Kara Unger) 7.5/10 very gripping, never ending suspence.

 

this has been one of my all-time fav's since seeing it in the theatre back in '97. The recent Criterion Blu Ray release is AWESOME!

post #15641 of 16041
The Dictator 2012



Totally funny 8 out 10.
post #15642 of 16041

I have to say, this movie impressed me far more than I expected. It goes without saying that a Woody Allen film would be well-written and directed, but I found myself being drawn into the characters and the complexity of the relationships. Overall, a funny, well-executed, entertaining film. 

 

"Blue Jasmine" - 8.5/10

 

post #15643 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post

I have to say, this movie impressed me far more than I expected. It goes without saying that a Woody Allen film would be well-written and directed, but I found myself being drawn into the characters and the complexity of the relationships. Overall, a funny, well-executed, entertaining film. 

"Blue Jasmine" - 8.5/10






For a filmmaker whos morality is questioned by the media and people in general, all of his movies have a great moral message. This movie has such a beautiful message but told in such a dark way.
post #15644 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post


For a filmmaker whos morality is questioned by the media and people in general, all of his movies have a great moral message. This movie has such a beautiful message but told in such a dark way.

 

Well said...and I agree, there is an underlying morality at play. I love that there is a reluctance to romanticize things in a manner that disregards the consequences. I have a lot of respect for that approach. I thought the ending was excellent, too...the images of the final few minutes are still very clear in my brain. 

post #15645 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post

Well said...and I agree, there is an underlying morality at play. I love that there is a reluctance to romanticize things in a manner that disregards the consequences. I have a lot of respect for that approach. I thought the ending was excellent, too...the images of the final few minutes are still very clear in my brain. 


Yes, a true return to form, showing perfect acting and pace. One of my favorite movies of the year.
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