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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1039

post #15571 of 16181

Nebraska - 8/10.  Well directed, very witty, and a nice storyline.  The use black and white was  very effective in creating a good distance from the viewer.  You get that perception that you're never involved in the film, in a strange kind of way. For me, black and white kind of serves as a window or perceptual structure that makes you look in from the other side of the window - so to speak.  Good directly and a down to earth script helps.

post #15572 of 16181

Big Bad Wolves.http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2309224/

 

     An Israeli crime drama that begins on a high note and continues to keep you tense until the end. Owing more to the Korean genre than hollywood (thank heavens) this plays out with alternating psychological terror and Israeli humour. I'd give it a firm 7/10.

 

Everything Will Be Fine http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1403846/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

 

     A wonderful Danish film that spawned a few remakes. You want to see the original here as it is filmed in the dogme manner which in this instance is a little overdone in spots. A psycho drama that builds well and has a little to contrite a final exposition, almost as if the filmakers saw they were hitting a time limit and needed a quick wrap up. Still the body of the film is well worth looking at . 8/10

 

Doomsday Book http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2297164/?ref_=nv_sr_1

 

     A Korean look at the end of the world in 3 segments. If you are not a fan of Korean humour give this a pass. Otherwise it's conceptually brilliant but execution falls short. They left a little too much in the studio floor and not enough on the celluloid. It has some great concepts and digs at western film that never really get the treatment they deserve. Watching this film is much like seeing a stand up comic that never actually delivers the punch line. It's constantly entertaining yet leaves you unfulfilled. 6/10

post #15573 of 16181

Anchorman 2 - 5/10

 

Watching this was a real test of my endurance. I got about an hour into it and somehow managed to finish it after a break.

I would say that there was a few LOL moments..maybe 5 in the entire movie.

 

Most of the humor was just the WTF/Bizarre type humor. I was thinking maybe the scriptwriter was on drugs or something.

I think they tried to make the most ridiculous movie ever made. I like of liked it for that in a way.

 

I must be an idiot but I found the "chicken of the cave" thing funny.

 

I hope this movie didn't make a ton of money at the box office..

 

I got it from redbox. Luckily I also got "Philomena" along with it.

 

This youtube clip is actually funnier than the actual movie:

(ron burgundy emerson college press conference)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJU3R8ooo2U

 

BTW some of the humor is the type i've seen in very old Hong Kong movies.

post #15574 of 16181

The Wolf of Wall Street - 8

 

Scorcese casts a satirical look at the adventures and misadventures of Jordan Belfort as soon as he becomes a stockbroker at Wall Street stock market. Debauchery and corruption, irreverently portrayed in this movie, were commonplace elements in the real life of this man while he conned his way into fortune. I haven't seen a Scorcese film in a long time, and yet The Wolf of Wall Street turned up to match exactly the only expectation I had - a movie that entertains and engages effortlessly by way of the trademark cinematic quality and vitality of Scorcese, but also seems to be a residuum of redundancy since, in many ways, this is a similar work to past outputs like Goodfellas, for example. Was there any need to make a movie with such potentially contemptuous portray of debauchery? Maybe Scorcese thought so because otherwise it would be much more difficult to deviate the viewer's attention away from the fact that this is just more of the same. The same narrative concept, the same energy and aesthetics while we follow the rise and fall of the main characters (or group of main characters) connected to a criminal activity, the only differences are the thematic context and tone. The truth is, so much debauchery makes the movie a bit too long and slightly boring. What's so interesting about it?

 

But redundant or not, The Wolf of Wall Street is one more example of Scorcese's fine cinematic craft, technically perfect, very well polished, exciting and funny, with rock solid acting all around, I particularly liked DiCaprio and Jonah Hill. After watching this epic portrayal of Belfort's life of excess, one might have the natural tendency to look for an explanation or meaning behind all that, but I think that the main premiss of this work is to serve as an engaging and funny cinematic experience a bit like American Hustle. I think these two movies have relatively similar premisses, but David O. Russel's effort, itself with an imprint of Scorcese DNA, is a sexier, more organic, funnier and more appealing cinematic experience to me. I guess it's a matter of taste that will dictate which movie one likes the most.

 

Revaluating American Hustle to 9.


Edited by kkl10 - 4/27/14 at 2:36pm
post #15575 of 16181

Philomena - 9.75/10

 

Near perfect. If it wasn't for the acting this movie would not be nearly as good.

Worth buying I think.

 

Judi Dench deserved an oscar for this!

post #15576 of 16181

Robocop (2013)

Pro:

1. The gadgets are cool.

 

Cons:

1. PG-13...what?

2. It's a thriller with limited violence and limited suspense...

3. He died in his home? Why not making him beat up bad **** by gangs and corrupted police.

4. Automatic robot vs humans debate to nowhere.

5. A shootout in darkness... ARE YOU SERIOUS? I DON"T WANT ANY ALONE IN THE DARK CRAP ANYMORE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

6. Nobody dares to fight him, making it very lame.

7. A boss fight full of talking... ubyjbuesivgjdbvuyhd bgtbucygvyjvhy xbne5bgvmsxhngxfcjrhjgntxygkvhng,bvcnkdjb bhuyjcesuktbdvjecbky jyvbkundh sikbd bvitbh gsbvybhkcebtsviut

8. A silver Robocop in the end means 'We **** up and here's a compensation for all Robocop fans! Hope you like it!'

9. Samuel L. Jackson is my chocolate (no pun intended), but in here he's pointless.

 

Overall: 4.8/10

 

The new Robocop actually has a really humongous chance to be something great with all that political, thriller, violence and a debate of should we have machines to take over the justice system. That would be awesome. But oh god how bad they missed this train. 

post #15577 of 16181

"Hangover 3" - 0.004/10

 

I'm not even going to bother taking the two minutes to copy/paste an image of the movie poster for this one. This is an absolute abortion of a film, except for one very small scene during the credits. There were three or four scenes/references to animal cruelty within the first half hour (nothing gets the audience in the mood to laugh like killing dogs, right?), the "plot" was embarrassing, and the only time I laughed even a little was at the scene mentioned above. 

 

I loved the first one, the second one was just ok, but this film is nothing but a money grab that completely disrespects the viewers and the cast. 

post #15578 of 16181

"Philomena" [7.6/10]: A good Saturday night movie on pay-per-view. Touching story, good performances. Probably just me, but it reminded me somewhat of "Rainman." Philomena didn't touch me as deeply as that movie. I was aware of the "laundry girls" from a Sixty Minutes story that I saw quite some time ago. Maybe I wasn't as impressed with this movie since I was aware of the story behind the film before I saw it. 


Edited by DLeeWebb - 4/28/14 at 5:06am
post #15579 of 16181

Double Indemnity (1944) - 8,5

 

The most secret intention of an experienced insurance salesman blends with the perverse desire of his lusted woman to put an end to her husband's life. The classic story about the extramarital affair that commits spousal homicide. One of the great classics from Hollywood's golden age, Double indemnity is a seminal film noir directed by Billy Wilder, based on a novel of the same name authored by James M. Cain, whose inspiration came from a real case dating from 1927. This realistic movie does not portray the mechanics of the real case, the story here is much more sophisticated, intelligent and still perfectly plausible to happen in the reality of that time. In Double Indemnity we know from the very beginning that things will end terribly wrong. However, we still afford the privilege to witness and experience the tribulations of the evil mind as it meticulously sets in motion the perfect crime. We also experience the emotional unrest of the perpetrator as he verifies the authorities proving him wrong as they slowly unravel the truth. In addition to the wonderfully crafted suspense, this movie is also a wide open window to the complex psychological canvas of the guilty subject who deceives his daily friend until the eventual confession.

 

This movie is notable for the excellence of the narrative craft, which is enough to wrap me in the thrilling and realistic story, the dialogues are superb. The naturalistic and effortless acting endows the movie with life and emotional power. Barbara Stanwyck's role stands in my memory as the archetype of the femme fatale, beautiful, lustful, sweet, but a true wolf in sheep's clothing! Fred McMurray and Edward G. Robinson are also at high-level. Except for some memorable scenes, I didn't find the visual style to be particularly notable, the camera work is clean and polished, but apart from the innovative light and shadow work of John F. Seitz, there are no other gimmicks to enhance the visual style, this is a thoroughly realistic and stripped picture. I also lament the less than perfect condition of the film's analog source when it was converted to digital format, a bit more visual integrity and Double Indemnity would be an immaculate cinematic experience for me. Another wonderful black-and white classic, highly recommended!


Edited by kkl10 - 4/29/14 at 2:39pm
post #15580 of 16181

Enemy 8.75/10

post #15581 of 16181

12 years a slave: 9.57/10

 

Emotional, accurate, and entertaining at the same time. 12 years a slave is definitely an Oscar worth film just for the story and education value. (AND THE SINGING!!!!! IT'S GREAT!!!!!)

 

Lone Survivor: 8.34/10

 

Too dramatic at some point, the Lone Survivor is a actually very tatical accurate story about a doomed SEAL mission. 

 

Thor the dark world: 7.62/10

 

Not that interesting than the first. The film loose itself to awkward side characters. Not that interesting, but when things explode, it is entertaining. Not bad after all.

post #15582 of 16181

The Banishment ( 2007) 9/10

 

After the success of his debut The Return ( 2003) Andrey Zvyagintsev underwhelmed critics with his second film The Banishment. Before watching it I was guessing Zvyagintsev's supposed failings: did he go too far into symbolism, were his ideas suitable or accessible for the audience etc? With his two successive films The Banishment and Elena ( 2011) Zvyagintsev slowed down a bit like Tarkovsky after Andrey Rublev. The pace of The Return was not fast but it was not particularly slow. After watching The Banishment I came to a conclusion that critics failed the film which damaged its world distribution ( for example, it is not available in the US). It was gripping, visually beautiful, atmospheric. There were faults in the ending of the story when we had to go back in time, there were scenes which reminded Tarkovsky ( accusations at lack of originality?). But as a whole the film was superb.

 

Quote:
 The critical consensus of The Banishment on its theatrical release was that, while stunningly beautiful and excellently acted, it is unoriginal and narratively confused. In fact, reading the reviews at the time of its belated UK release, it almost seemed as if the reviewers had for some reason clubbed together to ensure that none of them went out on a limb to give it too much praise. There was an excess, we were told, of characters gazing wordlessly into the distance, like a parody of an Antonioni movie; there was too much heavy-handed symbolism; too much music by cult composer Arvo Part; the characterisation was psychologically implausible; above all, the film fell well short of the achievement of The Return, the director`s debut feature. Nearly all the reviewers seemed to have identical opinions.

So I was anxious to see whether a second viewing of this intense family drama would confirm my initial enthusiastic response, and the answer is an emphatic "yes". Again, the 160 minutes, which seemed more like 60, are utterly gripping throughout, though concentration is required. Yes, there are scenes where characters gaze wordlessly into the distance, but far less than the reviewers imply, and it is wholly in keeping with the characters' predicament. 

Zvyagintsev has, to my mind, established himself as a hugely visionary director, whose debt to Tarkovsky is obvious. He is a master at creating an ominous, portentous, threatening mood (and this is where Arvo Part's music helps).

If The Banishment had been Zviagintsev's first feature, I suspect that the reviewers of our daily and Sunday newspapers would have hailed it as an out-and-out masterpiece. But they seem afraid of heaping too much praise on the second film of a "difficult" director whose first was such a critical triumph; they prefer the safety of a Batman or Harry Potter movie, entertaining but otherwise pointless.

 

Elena ( 2011) 8/10

 

Elena of three Zvyagintsev's films is more difficult to get engaged into. Zvyagintsev told that he wanted to make a movie about apocalypse in his particular vision which was portrayed in his main character Elena. The idea was that money corrupt a soul. When instead of ideals there is only basic instinct how to survive and provide for relatives. I think that this idea was too difficult and too specific to transform into a convincing visual story. Nevertheless the final product worked as an original character study urban thriller. Cinematography is top level as usual in this director's films.

 

Quote:
 Mr. Zvyagintsev deflected accusations that he imitates Tarkovsky, saying that it was impossible not to be inspired by him. The next day, “Rublev” still on his mind, Mr. Zvyagintsev mused about Russia. “We are a feudal society,” he said, “with a slavish mentality. I don’t think we can ever change this until our entire world order changes. We need to have many new generations born in freedom.”

Edited by mutabor - 5/2/14 at 5:10am
post #15583 of 16181

Troll hunter: 8.51/10

 

I felt like watching a over-the-top "Finding Bigfoot" with some freaking huge trolls. I like how the movie took trolls as animals biologically, not rolling stones that makes children psychologically afraid of their powers. It is a hell of a joyride with great story and explaining. Kudos for you, Norway! :D

post #15584 of 16181

Playtime (1967) - 8

 

The wholly artificial environment of modern cities is an obstacle to natural social construct among people, it gives rise to alienation and strange behavioral patterns. The urban lifestyle is akin to life in a giant carousel or machinery, in a way, dehumanizing. So seems to suggest the comic choreography conceived by Jacques Tati. Subtle choreography, but complex and powerful. In Playtime, the singular cinematic language crafted by the French filmmaker departs from narrative conventions, this is fancy Cinema that relies heavily on technical rigor and prowess to make its point come across. Ironically or not, Playtime seems to be a cinematic product of the same dehumanizing and alienating phenomena that the film itself seems to mock about in human relations. A particularly eloquent proposal from such perspective, the notion of plot is very faint and the distance between the viewer and the human subjects within the film is so large that I almost feel like I'm watching a laboratory experiment where the effects of modern technology and architecture on human relations are dissected. But, on the other hand, it could be said that Playtime is going back to its roots, at times it is very reminiscent of Silent Cinema and it even brought me faint memories of Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin. It's a truly unique cinematic experience. The humorous pathos created by the numerous bizarre or absurd situations being represented is, possibly, the only narrative anchor that denounces the humanly persuasive premiss of this singular work. What's most impressive for me is the effortless way how this film immerses me in the cinematic experience despite being so unconventional. The aesthetical appeal fascinates me and the cinematography is beautiful. I haven't seen Playtime in a long time, but it maintains the same vitality in the way it intrigues, entertains and amuses me just like years ago when I first met this film. Jacques Tati deliberated the construction of a small futuristic city scenery just to shoot this work. Such ambition cost him dearly in his life, but the final product brought him deserved immortality. Playtime is a mandatory watch for any cinephile!


Edited by kkl10 - 5/2/14 at 4:01pm
post #15585 of 16181
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Playtime (1967) - 8

 

The wholly artificial environment of modern cities is an obstacle to natural social construct among people, it gives rise to alienation and strange behavioral patterns. The urban lifestyle is akin to life in a giant carousel or machinery, in a way, dehumanizing. So seems to suggest the comic choreography conceived by Jacques Tati. Subtle choreography, but complex and powerful. In Playtime, the singular cinematic language crafted by the French filmmaker departs from narrative conventions, this is fancy Cinema that relies heavily on technical rigor and prowess to make its point come across. Ironically or not, Playtime seems to be a cinematic product of the same dehumanizing and alienating phenomena that the film itself seems to mock about in human relations. A particularly eloquent proposal from such perspective, the notion of plot is very faint and the distance between the viewer and the human subjects within the film is so large that I almost feel like I'm watching a laboratory experiment where the effects of modern technology and architecture on human relations are dissected. But, on the other hand, it could be said that Playtime is going back to its roots, at times it is very reminiscent of Silent Cinema and it even brought me faint memories of Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin. It's a truly unique cinematic experience. The humorous pathos created by the numerous bizarre or absurd situations being represented is, possibly, the only narrative anchor that denounces the humanly persuasive premiss of this singular work. What's most impressive for me is the effortless way how this film immerses me in the cinematic experience despite being so unconventional. The aesthetical appeal fascinates me and the cinematography is beautiful. I haven't seen Playtime in a long time, but it maintains the same vitality in the way it intrigues, entertains and amuses me just like years ago when I first met this film. Jacques Tati deliberated the construction of a small futuristic city scenery just to shoot this work. Such ambition cost him dearly in his life, but the final product brought him deserved immortality. Playtime is a mandatory watch for any cinephile!

 

I got the BFI Jacques Tati collection (multi-region player required):

 

Jour de fête 1949

Mr. Hulot's Holiday 1953

Mon Oncle 1958

Playtime 1967

Parade 1974

 

Mr. Hulot's Holiday is by far my favorite Tati film, and the first I saw. Coming in second is Mon Oncle, that grabs hold of you from the opening scene with the stray dogs. If you like Playtime you'll love Trafic. Remember the old waiter that goes around with the towel drapped over his arm and always laughing, smiling - he's in Trafic as the car show presenter.

 

The set didn't have Trafic so I got that separately from amazon.uk. He's got several shorts that are very good too and they come with the Criterion Collection dvds in the supplements.

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