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post #15556 of 16083

Atonement (2007). 9/10 Directed by Joe Wright (Pride & Prejudice, Hanna). Wow. So many moments where your feelings just well up and you can't hold it back this film is so well done. After seeing the two others from Joe Wright that I've seen, he just joined a short list of my absolutely favorite current directors. And the ending. The way you see one version and then, you are seamlessly merged back into time to show you what you thought you saw, or what Briony (Saoirse Ronan) thinks she saw. And the films narration is primarily from one character - as you find out in the end - and what an ending. Do not read the Roger Ebert review as it may contain spoilers - watch this one cold.

 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/atonement-2007


Primer - What Happens if it Actually Works? (2004). 8.75/10 Directed by and stars Shane Carruth (Upstream Color), his first film. I had to watch this with the subtitles on, and the pause / rewind handy, so I could keep up. Even so, I missed so much, though this takes nothing away from the genius of this very low budjet gem. Watched it again back to back with the director's commentary and he explains a lot. I will definitely watch this again - several times. Another new director who I will follow - and who made my list.

 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/primer-2004

post #15557 of 16083
Quote:

Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

 

"Like Father, Like Son" from Japan...

 

Found a great, new to me, review site:

 

http://criterioncast.com/reviews/theatrical/joshua-reviews-hirokazu-kore-edas-like-father-like-son-theatrical-review/

 

"What does it mean to be a father? What does the word ‘family’ truly mean? Webster defines the word ‘father’ in a handful of ways. Be it as just a ‘male parent’ or as a male who has sired a child, the definition of being a father is often times seen, at least here in the states, as the paternal member of a nuclear family."

post #15558 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

The Wicker Man (1973) - 6

 

Horror film directed by the British Robin Hardy. Interesting screenplay, but unrealized by a direction that left much to be desired, in my opinion. Not wanting to sound rude, this seemed like an amateur directorial work, this an insipid film, not capable of inspiring any reaction, feeling or mood in me, except when, inadvertently, it seems to mock itself, i.e., indulging in its own cinematic limitations and banality, in these cases it either amuses or unnerves me. The only positive things I could extract from here (besides the promising screenplay) were the female beauties, one or two wonderful folk songs and some comical moments (I'm not sure they were supposed to be so). The typical mediocre movie that never takes itself seriously and I usually try to avoid, but I understand why it has acquired the cult status. Major disappointment, to oblivion.

Well, we can always look to the remake for some entertainment.

post #15559 of 16083

omg, that Cage film was one of the worst movies I've ever seen...I had tried to block it out

post #15560 of 16083

Captain America:The Winter Soldier 7/10

7/10 is a pretty good rating IMO. It was flashy, yet mildly thought provoking. The villains were a really realistic take on a villain and that's something not seen often. It did have a lot of "movie" moments in it that really just left me going "why...why did they have to have that" but other than that it was well done.

post #15561 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

 

Found a great, new to me, review site:

 

http://criterioncast.com/reviews/theatrical/joshua-reviews-hirokazu-kore-edas-like-father-like-son-theatrical-review/

 

"What does it mean to be a father? What does the word ‘family’ truly mean? Webster defines the word ‘father’ in a handful of ways. Be it as just a ‘male parent’ or as a male who has sired a child, the definition of being a father is often times seen, at least here in the states, as the paternal member of a nuclear family."

 

Yesterday I watched a family drama about a father and his two sons, Andrey Zvyagintsev's debut The Return ( 2003) which won prestigious Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival.

 

 

When I saw Zvyagintsev's film Leviathan in the main program of Cannes 2014 I decided to give a try to his earlier works. The Return is definitely not an average movie, its cinematography is of higher caliber ( there were even comparisons with Tarkovsky). Unlike other Russian art-house which is particularly depressing and hence is avoided by western audience the story of The Return is kind of universal though still horrible :D. Looking forward for Leviathan, hopefully Zvyagintsev will make an impact.


Edited by mutabor - 4/26/14 at 3:41am
post #15562 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

 

Yesterday I watched a family drama about a father and his two sons, Andrey Zvyagintsev's debut The Return ( 2003) which won prestigious Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival.

 

 

When I saw Zvyagintsev's film Leviathan in the main program of Cannes 2014 I decided to give a try to his earlier works. The Return is definitely not an average movie, its cinematography is of higher caliber ( there were even comparisons with Tarkovsky). Unlike other Russian art-house which is particularly depressing and hence is avoided by western audience the story of The Return is kind of universal though still horrible :D. Looking forward for Leviathan, hopefully Zvyagintsev will make an impact.

 

I've got The Return in my queue. Thanks for the heads up on Leviathan. I was thinking of the 2012 documentary, and found this:

 

http://24fpsverite.com/news/zvyagintsevs-leviathan-first-image/

 

Zvyagintsev’s Leviathan First Image

 

“A unique film for Andrei, Leviathan has his trademark visual style and narrative but it is also breathtakingly beautiful.  Leviathan, is a modern retelling of the Biblical story of Job and it is populated with amazing intricately developed characters that we can easily feel empathy for." - Variety

 

Leviathan First

edit: date


Edited by fractus2 - 4/26/14 at 8:11am
post #15563 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

 

Yesterday I watched a family drama about a father and his two sons, Andrey Zvyagintsev's debut The Return ( 2003) which won prestigious Golden Lion at Venice Film Festival.

 

 

When I saw Zvyagintsev's film Leviathan in the main program of Cannes 2014 I decided to give a try to his earlier works. The Return is definitely not an average movie, its cinematography is of higher caliber ( there were even comparisons with Tarkovsky). Unlike other Russian art-house which is particularly depressing and hence is avoided by western audience the story of The Return is kind of universal though still horrible :D. Looking forward for Leviathan, hopefully Zvyagintsev will make an impact.

 

That's a good one and I kept thinking about it years later. After watching that I went out and bought the director's next film "The Banishment". I think my version I had to order from Amazon UK and it's PAL only.

I haven't seen it yet. "The Return" is the kind of movie I like, but it definitely won't put you in a good mood.

 

I always love a movie with some amazing cinematography. Have you seen anything from Nuri Bilge Ceylan? Sometimes I think i've watched all his films just for the cinematography. I somewhat liked most of his films ("Three Monkeys" was AWFUL though).

 

I watched his movie "Distant" first and didn't like it much but I couldn't stop thinking about it for a few weeks. His movies are generally super slow and I don't know how he keeps getting to make movies.

 

I think they may be even slower than films from Andrei Tarkovsky. I still haven't finished "Solaris" and never even started 2 of his movies I own. I also have problems staying awake for Ingmar Bergman movies. I don't have a short attention span and as long as a slow movie gives me something to think about then I can sit through it. Has to have interesting characters also..

 

Most recent snore fest for me was unfortunately "The Great Beauty".

 

Oh yeah, if you liked The Return, try "Spirit of the Beehive". I really wish I didn't sell my Criterion DVD of that...


Edited by tdockweiler - 4/26/14 at 11:24am
post #15564 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

Atonement (2007). 9/10 Directed by Joe Wright (Pride & Prejudice, Hanna). Wow. So many moments where your feelings just well up and you can't hold it back this film is so well done. After seeing the two others from Joe Wright that I've seen, he just joined a short list of my absolutely favorite current directors. And the ending. The way you see one version and then, you are seamlessly merged back into time to show you what you thought you saw, or what Briony (Saoirse Ronan) thinks she saw. And the films narration is primarily from one character - as you find out in the end - and what an ending. Do not read the Roger Ebert review as it may contain spoilers - watch this one cold.

 

I would have given the movie a 10/10 except for something that ruined it for me. Reminds me of "Failan" from South Korea.

 

Love that long shot on the beach that is all one take. Felt like I was really there.  Not sure if there is a youtube video out there of that scene, but I like it for some reason.

 

It's this one:

http://www.steadishots.org/shots_detail.cfm?shotID=298

 

I really do wish we had more movies like this though..

post #15565 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post
 

 

I always love a movie with some amazing cinematography. Have you seen anything from Nuri Bilge Ceylan? Sometimes I think i've watched all his films just for the cinematography. I somewhat liked most of his films ("Three Monkeys" was AWFUL though).

 

Have never heard about this guy. I do see his film Winter Sleep in the Competition program of Cannes 2014. I'm going to watch something from him.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post
 

Most recent snore fest for me was unfortunately "The Great Beauty".

 

I wasn't impressed either.

post #15566 of 16083

Lovely Molly 9/10

 

Blair witch co writer director Eduardo Sánchez and Lord of the Rings exec producer Mark Ordesky. I thoroughly enjoyed this creepy, slightly depressing possession/haunting genre film. The acting is first class especially from Gretchen Lodge who plays Molly. It got a mediocre rating with Rotten Tomatoes (no surprises there) but the pro critics rated it very highly. 

 

This is a dark and creepy movie that left quite an impression me. 

 

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post #15567 of 16083

Wolf Chrildren: 8.16/10

 

A movie about werewolves?! NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It's from Japan? Oh thank god, I can't handle shirtless werewolves anymore.

 

Well actually its a movie about Hana having single mother pain, especially taking care of two little werewolves, teaching them hiding their powers, and the choice of letting them go and do their stuff, and not protecting. Also, we got the challenge of hiding your powers and lie about it when accidentally hurting somebody with your powers, from Hana's daughter, Yuki, and the challenge of living in rural. This is well played considering how much pain, frustration and challenge for the whole family, especially Hana. It will be in my higher list but the story is just too flat and wearing down the entertainment the movie it has. Ultimately, it is a movie you can check out if you want.

 

BTW, it does have some scenes of shirtless werewolves. And it's not hilarious. 

post #15568 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

Lovely Molly 9/10

 

Blair witch co writer director Eduardo Sánchez and Lord of the Rings exec producer Mark Ordesky. I thoroughly enjoyed this creepy, slightly depressing possession/haunting genre film. The acting is first class especially from Gretchen Lodge who plays Molly. It got a mediocre rating with Rotten Tomatoes (no surprises there) but the pro critics rated it very highly. 

This is a dark and creepy movie that left quite an impression me. 

 

 

 

Thank you, I will give this a try. I was looking for a good horror movie to watch tonight.

post #15569 of 16083

Blackfish (2013): 9/10

 

Lopsided and narrowly-focused, but also passionate, eye-opening, and haunting. Well worth your time. 

 

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty (2013): 5/10

 

I've gotta agree with the critics on this one. It may be somewhat ambitious and is frequently quite lovely, but its tone is all over the place, its characters largely dull, and it makes several critical missteps in its storytelling (including some pretty rotten pacing) that it never recovers from. 

 

August: Osage County (2013): 6/10

 

Overstuffed with great performances (ranging from scene-chewing to varying shades of subtlety)--but great performances do not a great film make. How many dramatic plot-twists can one film contain before it's twisted itself to the point of breaking? Watch this film to find out!

post #15570 of 16083
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Blackfish (2013): 9/10

 

Lopsided and narrowly-focused, but also passionate, eye-opening, and haunting. Well worth your time.

 

Agreed. Very good documentary on Seaworld's track record.

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