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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1037

post #15541 of 16431

There Will Be Blood (2007) and 

No Country for Old Men (2007)

10/10 and 9/10, respectively.

 

This made for an excellent Easter Sunday double-feature--my only regret is that I watched both with a gaggle of philistines who ultimately summed up both films as 'pointless' and 'weird' narratives that only received critical acclaim for 'being too difficult to understand,' which automatically means that the 'Hollywood liberals' love them.

 

Family. @.@

post #15542 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

There Will Be Blood (2007) and 

No Country for Old Men (2007)

10/10 and 9/10, respectively.

 

This made for an excellent Easter Sunday double-feature--my only regret is that I watched both with a gaggle of philistines who ultimately summed up both films as 'pointless' and 'weird' narratives that only received critical acclaim for 'being too difficult to understand,' which automatically means that the 'Hollywood liberals' love them.

 

Family. @.@

 

How dare you to write only 3 lines of text?

Shame on you. :p

 

Those philistines must live in another world... or they're just that, philistines...

 

By the way thank you for introducing me to a new word, I had to check "philistine" on wikipedia to know what you mean, lol. I shall shamelessly reused it myself to insult whoever disagrees with me!


Edited by kkl10 - 4/21/14 at 3:36pm
post #15543 of 16431

Ugetsu (1953). 9/10 Directed by Kenji Mizoguchi. Stars both the samurai (Masayuki Mori), and samurai's wife (Machiko Kyo) from Kurosawa's 1950 Rashomon.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Two signature scenes: first is the lake scene, and second the final scene when the potter returns home to his wife and son.

 

Masayuki Mori also starred in Kurosawa's The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail, Sanshiro Sugata Part II, The Idiot, and The Bad Sleep Well.

 

One of Roger Ebert's Great Movies:

 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/great-movie-ugetsu-1953

post #15544 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

 

How dare you to write only 3 lines of text?

Shame on you. :p

 

Those philistines must live in another world... or they're just that, philistines...

 

By the way thank you for introducing me to a new word, I had to check "philistine" on wikipedia to know what you mean, lol. I shall shamelessly reused it myself to insult whoever disagrees with me!

 

You're welcome! At least my three lines of text were good for something. ^^

post #15545 of 16431

Kung Fu Hustle: 8.7/10

 

As a Hong Kongese, I loved the works by Stephen Chow. His movies are extremely funny and weird-but-works-all-the-time timing. Kung Fu Hustle exploits all of his style to extreme. The fight scenes are over the top creative and active. The comedies are wacky. The story is although may suffers from Chinese corniness, is well made by using a parallel smooth technique. It is fantasic. I've been re watching this for ages and I still find it funny and lovely. Sadly, Stephen Chow got into Shyamalan disorder, which causes directors lost his directing skills. Nowadays his films cannot be as good as Kung Fu Hustle. Oh well, it's time for a farewell...

 

Or maybe he will get healed... maybe...

post #15546 of 16431

Close-up (1990) - 8

 

Hossain Sabzian is a poor man indistinguishable from any other individual crossing the same streets he crosses, but he is a cinema lover. In a twist of fate he is approached by lady Ahankhah, on a bus, regarding the book he holds in his hands, The Cyclist, and Sabzian tells her that he is the author of the novel and of the movie of the same name. And so began the whimsical artifice that led this man to assume the identity of his idolized filmmaker Mohsen Makhmalbaf and to make the house of the Ahankhah family his chosen pseudo-shooting location for a few weeks. Eventually his deceptive agenda is discovered, Sabzian is arrested by the authorities and in the following trial he has to justify his actions to the Ahankhah family and the judge. By staging and monitoring in real time this weird story with the real people involved, Abbas Kiarostami proposes us a reflection on the distinction between reality and fiction, between the true identity of a person and the mere representation of a role.

 

It's not easy to understand how striking this film really is without seeing it with our own eyes, there's no actors here, all the people we see are the real people involved in the staged (and non-staged) case, they represent themselves. The barrier that separates reality from fiction is smeared to the limit and while watching Close-up, one has the feeling of witnessing the real events as they happen which endows this work with another vitality of persuasion and expression. The lengthy trial is particularly striking to watch because that's real, not staged, and the way that Kiarostami outlines Sabzian argumentation to make his own message come across to us is brilliant. Given its legal and argumentative mechanics, the judgment scene evokes a reflection on the legitimacy and meaning, not only about what Sabzian made​​, but also about the role of art in people's lives.

 

Close-up is a fine example of what's called Docufiction, maybe the best I've ever seen because watching the film for the first time without the least idea of what it is, I was so engrossed in its ruse that in the end I was asking myself, perplexed, if what I just saw was real or not. This is one of those films that haunt me long days after the screening as much for its cinematographic cunning as for what it makes me think. In addition to the reflection it compels, this intelligent work from Kiarostami also shows that Cinema, ironically or not, can turn dreams into reality, or on the contrary, turn reality into a dream or a film when looked from another perspective. Despite the conceptual genius, Close-up is no eye candy, no significant aesthetical appeal to redeem itself, it is worth for the accomplishment as a docufiction experience. I appreciate the concept and I admire and respect this work for that, I think this is a reference work. I think Close-up is mandatory watch for any cinephile!


Edited by kkl10 - 4/23/14 at 4:06am
post #15547 of 16431

I got an early screening and while I was entertained and did enjoy the movie I came away feeling like the movie is just a long prelude to the next movie.

To me it felt like Electro was just thrown in so Spider-Man would have someone to fight. 

 

post #15548 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Under the Skin (2013): 8/10

 

(Potentially mild spoilers. You may want to go into this without knowing anything about it.)

 

A bravely directed, acted, and scripted sci-fi thriller that dabbles convincingly in erotica, horror, surrealism, and even cinéma vérité, sometimes all at the same time (or close to it). Taking place in Scotland (shot as an almost perpetually cold, dark, wet hell), it follows an inhuman woman as she stalks and kills men, often luring them to their demise with nothing but her looks (Scarlett Johansson, whom the camera frequently fetishizes) and unsaid promises. Her murderous behavior, however, is simply her job: she's just following orders from a power higher than her. In fact, the more she mingles with the people of Scotland, the more she empathizes with them, and she begins to question her motivation and her identity--and we, the audience, might begin to ask what it means to be human. All of this is accomplished with little intelligible dialogue (most of the characters have thick accents, and their voices are low in the mix, buried beneath the ambient noises and drone soundtrack) and unconventional cinematic language (flashes of Kubrick are evident here and there, as many reviewers have pointed out.)

 

If the film fails in any regards, it's in how detached it is. This film is almost purely an exercise in intellect, and outside of one beautiful, sort of tragicomic scene (a conversation between the woman and a disfigured young man, which powerfully highlights either her surprising innocence or her manipulative abilities--or both), there is very little here to become emotionally invested with. Nonetheless, this is a fascinating film, in some ways reminiscent of last year's Upstream Color. Recommended, at least for art house film fans.

 

8.5/10 Just saw this today. I highly recommend it. The film's title is so fitting. The music is so eerie and suits this film perfectly. The plot is not hard to follow - you get just enough to figure out what is going on -

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

who's handling who, the teamwork, the betrayal / defection, and also the physical limitations of what's under the skin. No alien super powers - just another intelligent carbon based bipedal life form that can be injured, can be burned, can be killed. The one scene at the lair where motorcycle man does a close 360 visual inspection of her from every 90 degrees is explained by the ending (and the films title) when her rapist runs off in horror. You think you know the reason for the films title in the floating victim scenes, and it is a parallel reason, with the pov shot of the last victim seeing the leftover skin after it's drained float off. Staying for the credits, there was a whole section on the underwater team.

 

You can sense the change in her during the pick up of the disfigured man. Then you see him following her - I thought, she's going to let him stay on the surface, but no, he descends like the rest - then, she pulls him out of the muck (you don't see this) and aids in his short-lived escape.

There was the one scene, where she walks past the bus stop then the guy, and walks back to sit in the bus stop, and in the long shot you see the bus enter the sene at the top. Such a beautiful scene - they cut away so quickly though. And that gale blowing the sea spray on the rocky shore, outlining the swirling cylindrical air currents was another beautiful shot.


Edited by fractus2 - 4/22/14 at 8:35pm
post #15549 of 16431

Ran (1985) - 9

 

Once again Akira Kurosawa adapts a Shakespeare tragedy, King Lear, to the Sengoku period of Japan. Just like Throne of Blood, Ran easily engulfs me in a magical world of great enchantment, but this is a chaotic and cruel world. A world made of suffering where gods will not save Men from himself and where the thirst for power is the mirror of the natural struggle for survival, ethics and morality are subdued by the samurai conduct and interests of the powerful. Film of great symbolic significance, to watch Ran is like watching an epic and blazing Noh (form of Japanese classical theater) performance that reveals the true gist of human nature and existence. Tecnically superb work with countless memorable scenes, hauntingly beautiful soundtrack by Toru Takemitsu (whose work I highly appreciate), top-notch cinematography, camera work and acting, all in perfect harmony to create a deeply melancholic, beautiful and exciting universe. Ran is not without its shortcomings though. I may speak for a minority, but this would be a virtually perfect film in my eyes, if not for Kurosawa's maniac obsession with redundant battle scenes, especially in the last half hour or so (yet again, for what?!), some dragging moments ought to be chopped out with more insightful editing work to keep up with the standards of the rest of the film, enough is enough. And hard for me to believe that no life was lost during those crazy shoots. Fortunately, these distractions are relatively minor here, not as bad as in Kagemusha, so it doesn't prevent Ran from becoming one of my favorite movies ever. The heartbreaking final scene also enters into my favorite list, perfect expression of how helpless we are in the world. Masterpiece from Kurosawa, highly recommended!


Edited by kkl10 - 4/23/14 at 6:27am
post #15550 of 16431
Quote:

Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

Under the Skin (2013)

 

8.5/10 Just saw this today. I highly recommend it. The film's title is so fitting. The music is so eerie and suits this film perfectly. The plot is not hard to follow - you get just enough to figure out what is going on -

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

who's handling who, the teamwork, the betrayal / defection, and also the physical limitations of what's under the skin. No alien super powers - just another intelligent carbon based bipedal life form that can be injured, can be burned, can be killed. The one scene at the lair where motorcycle man does a close 360 visual inspection of her from every 90 degrees is explained by the ending (and the films title) when her rapist runs off in horror. You think you know the reason for the films title in the floating victim scenes, and it is a parallel reason, with the pov shot of the last victim seeing the leftover skin after it's drained float off. Staying for the credits, there was a whole section on the underwater team.

 

You can sense the change in her during the pick up of the disfigured man. Then you see him following her - I thought, she's going to let him stay on the surface, but no, he descends like the rest - then, she pulls him out of the muck (you don't see this) and aids in his short-lived escape.

There was the one scene, where she walks past the bus stop then the guy, and walks back to sit in the bus stop, and in the long shot you see the bus enter the sene at the top. Such a beautiful scene - they cut away so quickly though. And that gale blowing the sea spray on the rocky shore, outlining the swirling cylindrical air currents was another beautiful shot.

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

This film stays with you long after you walk out of the theater. I began noticing details like the wet suit the swimmer was wearing (keeping him warm, under the second skin), how each victim is kept alive in the chamber - to let them dehydrate so that the skin becomes visibly looser.

 

Reminded me of Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs and how he kept them in the pit to aid in skin removal later. And the processing of the victim's innards - what is under the skin. Even the motorcyce man (men) have full body armor - his second skin. And finally the end revealling her true form under her skin.

 

You also get the sense that these beings have no advanced physical powers when you see her struggle with the body on the beach. That scene was hard to watch with the dog disappearing, then the wife, then the husband, then the kid left on the beach.

 

post #15551 of 16431

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) - 7,5

 

This is my premiere of Wes Anderson Cinema, a comedy-drama revolving around the Tenenbaum family. This director exerts an unmistakable cinematic style and reveals great attention to detail in all aspects that might influence the mise-en-scene and the expressive quality of the movie, scenery, sound, camera and editing work, cinematography, soundtrack, costumes and even the acting are all conditioned by the formal etiquette of the direction, technical virtuosity serving a somewhat baroque aesthetical sensibility that might not be to everyone's taste. Manneristic Cinema is how the work of this American director has been described. I find it a very appealing style and I think it has great potential to be interestingly developed in future works. Very funny and interesting the way that Wes carves his characters, not being exactly caricatures they have somewhat restricted behavioral patterns and eccentricity, yet they display a certain degree of complexity and this brings out psychological and emotional nuances that escape perception in many other films, but enhance the dramatic and comic effect of Wes Cinema. Artificial or not, the characters make perfect sense the way they are, that's the way they have to be. This film genre is not usually very interesting to me, but Wes Anderson stylized and bittersweet comedy offered me moments of pleasure and was music for my eyes (and ears), the only thing that I didn't care for was the story itself, Wes style and writing works very well to develop these humorous family tales, but it still seemed redundant to me, perhaps a good platform of cinematic experimentation for those starting out. The Royal Tenenbaums is worth a watch for those who enjoy these witty and tender comedies, Wes style fits like a glove in this genre and enriches it with a different cinematic quality.


Edited by kkl10 - 4/24/14 at 8:00am
post #15552 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

The Royal Tenenbaums (2001) - 7,5

 

This is my premiere of Wes Anderson Cinema,...

 

Is this your first Wes Anderson film? I've seen them all, and his last two (Moonrise Kingdom and The Grand Budapest Hotel) at the theater. I watched his first, Bottle Rocket pretty late, and after many of his later films. It sits in the top 3 of his that I love.

post #15553 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoMee View Post
 

I got an early screening and while I was entertained and did enjoy the movie I came away feeling like the movie is just a long prelude to the next movie.

To me it felt like Electro was just thrown in so Spider-Man would have someone to fight. 

 

 

What is a spiderman movie without someone to fight. Does anybody understand the reason for the reboot beside the change of actor?

post #15554 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

 

Is this your first Wes Anderson film? I've seen them all, and his last two (Moonrise Kingdom and The Grand Budapest Hotel) at the theater. I watched his first, Bottle Rocket pretty late, and after many of his later films. It sits in the top 3 of his that I love.


 Yes, first film. I'll try to see more stuff from Wes Anderson in the coming times, already have Moonrise Kingdom with me.

post #15555 of 16431

The Wicker Man (1973) - 6

 

Horror film directed by the British Robin Hardy. Interesting screenplay, but unrealized by a direction that left much to be desired, in my opinion. Not wanting to sound rude, this seemed like an amateur directorial work, this an insipid film, not capable of inspiring any reaction, feeling or mood in me, except when, inadvertently, it seems to mock itself, i.e., indulging in its own cinematic limitations and banality, in these cases it either amuses or unnerves me. The only positive things I could extract from here (besides the promising screenplay) were the female beauties, one or two wonderful folk songs and some comical moments (I'm not sure they were supposed to be so). The typical mediocre movie that never takes itself seriously and I usually try to avoid, but I understand why it has acquired the cult status. Major disappointment, to oblivion.

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