Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Rate The Last Movie You Watched
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1028

post #15406 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by vwinter View Post


It was very good. I feel like some people would find it hard to get past the unique art presentation, but if that isn't a barrier, x2 on highly recommended. Pacing was a bit uneven for me though.

 

Yeah, it's got some pretty noticeable barriers to entry that are going to stop some people dead in their tracks (a big one being, let's face it, the fact that it's an anime series), and Count 'purists' (do such people exist?) obviously won't be happy with some of the liberties that it takes with the plot, characters, setting, and tone. But if it's perhaps not the most faithful adaptation out there, it's the most spirited I've encountered, and by far the most compelling. And it's a fine anime series in its own right, independent of its source material. It's got a firm spot in my top ten, at least.

post #15407 of 16431

I was a bit lukewarm to the idea of the Hobbit films, but the first one ended up surprising me...I enjoyed it and found myself looking forward to the next one. I just finished watching "Smaug", and pretty much the same thing happened again...it surpassed my expectations. Smaug ended up being one of the most intimidating and effective villains I've seen on film in a long time. The CGI was very impressive and the pacing was such that it kept me really engaged for the duration. The ending is a bit abrupt and somewhat awkward, but understandable since we know there is a final chapter coming later this year. Overall, what a fun ride...

 

"The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug" - 9.0/10

 

 

 

 

 

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

I nearly rented this a while back so I was happy to see that it hit Netflix. I've been a huge fan of music since my childhood and it was really great to see a film that allowed some of these talented men and women to come into the lime light and get some well-deserved recognition. I came away so impressed with one of the women featured - Lisa Fischer - that I sent her a tweet (which she was kind enough to respond to) and bought her 1991 album that was recently remastered. Really interesting documentary that is worth the time investment. 

 

"20 Feet from Stardom"

 

8.4/10

 

 

post #15408 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Before Sunrise (1995) and Before Sunset (2004): 9/10

 

Technically assured (some of these films' takes are absolutely mind-boggling when you stop to think about them), beautifully filmed, soulfully written, effortlessly acted, and overflowing with marvelous, tiny, perfect moments. (Celine and Jesse in the listening booth in the first film; Celine reaching out to touch Jesse in the car before withdrawing in the second.) Both rank among the best romance films of all time insofar as I'm concerned--I'm really looking forward to watching the new one (Before Midnight) soon.

 

Really? I only watched Before Midnight and I only remember that a man and a woman were bickering with each other all the time. Especially the woman was constantly drilling and drilling her poor companion's mind. She was really annoying.

post #15409 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

 

Really? I only watched Before Midnight and I only remember that a man and a woman were bickering with each other all the time. Especially the woman was constantly drilling and drilling her poor companion's mind. She was really annoying.

 

Well, having not seen Before Midnight yet I can't comment on it or how the characters are presented there. But yes, the first two films are almost deliriously romantic.

post #15410 of 16431

Tim's Vermeer (2013): 8/10

 

A fascinating and funny documentary that's one part character study and one part exploration into what makes art art. It doesn't go as deeply into the latter as I would have liked, but maybe that's for the better. Hunt down the trailer to see if it looks like your cup of tea--and don't miss it if it does.

post #15411 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

 

1998 tv miniseries, or 2002 film?

 

Ah..sorry, i was talking about the film :p

post #15412 of 16431
I thought the miniseries was a lot better than the film, which was okay but nothing special.
post #15413 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by Za Warudo View Post

I thought the miniseries was a lot better than the film, which was okay but nothing special.

 

It's still enjoyable. I disliked the ending on the 1998 series. 

I know that converting a book into a series/movie i'ts a big challenge. 

post #15414 of 16431

I just watched The Hobbit: An Unexpected Adventure

 

 

 

absolute garbage.  Gandalf makes a golf joke? Burn the master copies, Peter. Why are there 3 Hobbit movies? Oh, I remember. Because there were 3 Hobbit books, right? RIGHT?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

….nope.

post #15415 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by darwinvsjesus View Post
 

I just watched The Hobbit: An Unexpected Adventure

 

 

 

absolute garbage.  Gandalf makes a golf joke? Burn the master copies, Peter. Why are there 3 Hobbit movies? Oh, I remember. Because there were 3 Hobbit books, right? RIGHT?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

….nope.

Totally agree and the second one is even a bigger pile of garbage. The ridiculous thing is that my friends get so fired up whenever I mention how crappy it is. And 99% of them haven't even read the book and act like I don't know what a good movie is lol

post #15416 of 16431

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (2003) - 8

 

A small lake surrounded by huge hills covered in dense wild forest, on that lake a little one division house rests afloat, this house is a buddhist monastery. Two people inhabit this idyllic landscape secluded from civilization: a man and a little boy child. The man is a monk and the boy child is his young apprentice. We are guided through a life cicle and the handover of buddhist life heritage between generations. It's an almost meditative experience of great enchantment. In the end this film left me with a faint sensation of nostalgia, seems like I experienced something completely forged by some fundamental Truth, it was highly evocative of my most primordial feelings or memories which are buried in the furthest most inacessible corners of my consciousness and so I can't dissect what they really are... I'm citing here an excerpt of another critique which, in my opinion, describes the sort of transcendental quality I see in this work or at least why it has this quality: (note I'm only speaking for myself, by "transcendental" I don't mean anything relating to spiritual paradigma, I mean the ability this film has to be something greater than the sum of it's parts)

 

"Spare and contained, with a timeless quality that makes it seem less a product of an individual human imagination than a collective memory..."

 

Collective memory... I couldn't say it better, the cinematic and technical craftsmanship could be a bit more polished but this is still notable work from Kim Ki-duk South Korean director, this man created here a powerful film that could very well catalyse the adoption of the spiritual paradigma in the hearts of the irresolute or in dilema. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring has great emotional power and children's tale enchantment yet it's not naïve, it's wise, presenting us a contemplative perspective of it's substance grounded on buddhist sapience. I think this is an excellent universal film for both children and adults, regardless of each one's creed. Wonderfull movie, highly recommended!


Edited by kkl10 - 3/31/14 at 9:54am
post #15417 of 16431

why is it that all fantasy movies have dialogue in a vaguely british-sounding dialect? 

 

….is it because it sounds more "old timey?" because it just sounds ******* stupid.

post #15418 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by darwinvsjesus View Post

 

absolute garbage.  Gandalf makes a golf joke? Burn the master copies, Peter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by darwinvsjesus View Post
 

why is it that all fantasy movies have dialogue in a vaguely british-sounding dialect? 

 

Golf jokes were present in the original novel, and Tolkien specifically meant for his fantasies to be a 'mythos' of sorts for Britain. I'm not really a fan of The Hobbit movies, but neither of these points are what bugged me about them.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring (2003) - 8

 

A small lake surrounded by huge hills covered in dense wild forest, on that lake a little one division house rests afloat, this house is a buddhist monastery. Two people inhabit this idyllic landscape secluded from civilization: a man and a little boy child. The man is a monk and the boy child is his young apprentice. We are guided through a life cicle and the handover of buddhist life heritage between generations. It's an almost meditative experience of great enchantment. In the end this film left me with a faint sensation of nostalgia, seems like I experienced something completely forged by some fundamental Truth, it was highly evocative of my most primordial feelings or memories which are buried in the furthest most inacessible corners of my consciousness and so I can't dissect what they really are... I'm citing here an excerpt of another critique which, in my opinion, describes the sort of transcendental quality I see in this work or at least why it has this quality: (note I'm only speaking for myself, by "transcendental" I don't mean anything relating to spiritual paradigma, I mean the ability this film has to be something greater than the sum of it's parts)

 

"Spare and contained, with a timeless quality that makes it seem less a product of an individual human imagination than a collective memory..."

 

Collective memory... I couldn't say it better, the cinematic and technical craftsmanship could be a bit more polished but this is still notable work from Kim Ki-duk South Korean director, this man created here a powerful film that could very well catalyse the adoption of the spiritual paradigma in the hearts of the irresolute or in dilema. Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring has great emotional power and children's tale enchantment yet it's not naïve, it's wise, presenting us a contemplative perspective of it's substance grounded on buddhist sapience. I think this is an excellent universal film for both children and adults, regardless of each one's creed. Wonderfull movie, highly recommended!

 

Have always meant to watch this movie, but have long neglected to! Thanks for the reminder.


Edited by metalsonata - 3/31/14 at 3:08pm
post #15419 of 16431

The Pacific - 10/10

 

This is the third time i've watched the series and it must be 10 hours or something. I think it's easily one of the best war movies ever made and up there with "Come and See", "Operation Dumbo Drop" and "The Thin Red Line".

Yep even better than the overrated Saving Private Ryan. I really hope HBO (and producer Tom Hanks) makes more of these movies. This one is even better than Band of Brothers.

 

Best episodes are the ones where they're on Peleliu and then on Okinawa. The Okinawa episode has some of the saddest and disturbing war scenes there is IMO. It really gets under my skin and one part I have to force myself to fast forward though it. Okinawan civilians had it the worst I think. I've read reviews where people claimed all the stuff they show in the movie is out to make American soldiers look bad. Well, all that happened and is based on facts. No movies have really shown things like that (trophy hunting). There is actually stuff in books the movies are based on that are too gruesome to even show in the Pacific.

 

I've read all the books the movies were based on (or "inspired by") and it makes the movies even better on repeat viewings. I also just recently read "Battle for Okinawa", which tells the story from the Japanese side.

 

I also saw the movie "Battle OF Okinawa" but that's so historically inaccurate that it's almost offensive. That movie even got a US release, but that's no surprise despite the negative view of Americans in the movie.

post #15420 of 16431
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Tim's Vermeer (2013): 8/10

 

A fascinating and funny documentary that's one part character study and one part exploration into what makes art art. It doesn't go as deeply into the latter as I would have liked, but maybe that's for the better. Hunt down the trailer to see if it looks like your cup of tea--and don't miss it if it does.

 

This is playing across town and I hope to catch it.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Rate The Last Movie You Watched