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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 1023

post #15331 of 16041

It looks great that is the least of it´s problem :). There is a reason it won so many technical oscars.

post #15332 of 16041

Machete Kills 7/10.

Grind house a go-go! that's all you need to know.

 

 

 

 

the pacing is a little odd.

post #15333 of 16041

Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973). 8/10. Directed by Sam Peckinpah, completing his western revisions after Ride the High Country and The Wild Bunch. Stars James Coburn and Kris Kristopherson as PG & BtK. So many cameos, including Slim Pickens and Katy Jurardo (plays his wife - also in Stanly Kubrick's One Eyed Jacks (1961) with Marlon Brando and Karl Malden, Peckinpah screenplay). Great scene where Pickens takes a gut shot and slowly walks to the river to die, his wife follows and you hear Dylan's Knocking on Heaven's Door (it's getting dark too dark to see). Awesome film, thumbs up.

 

The Armstrong Lie (2013). 6.5/10. Yeah, I got took too. (southpark: in line to get their wristband safely removed: can't believe we all got duped. i've been wearing this stupid thing for months...). Well done documentary.

 

eta: rating


Edited by fractus2 - 3/26/14 at 6:54am
post #15334 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid (1973). Directed by Sam Peckinpah, completing his western revisions after Ride the High Country and The Wild Bunch. Stars James Coburn and Kris Kristopherson as PG & BtK. So many cameos, including Slim Pickens and Katy Jurardo (plays his wife - also in Stanly Kubrick's One Eyed Jacks (1961) with Marlon Brando and Karl Malden, Peckinpah screenplay). Great scene where Pickens takes a gut shot and slowly walks to the river to die, his wife follows and you hear Dylan's Knocking on Heaven's Door (it's getting dark too dark to see). Awesome film, thumbs up.

 

The Armstrong Lie (2013). Yeah, I got took too. (southpark: in line to get their wristband safely removed: can't believe we all got duped. i've been wearing this stupid thing for months...). Well done documentary.

 The music makes the movie!


Edited by martin vegas - 3/20/14 at 8:20am
post #15335 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by martin vegas View Post
The music makes the movie!

concur. that's l.q. jones that james coburn guns down in that clip - he was in casino, major dundee, nevada smith, hang'm high, and recently in casino (commissionor) and the edge (lodge owner).

post #15336 of 16041

Coraline: 8.912527/10

 

  OH MY GOD!!! THIS IS NOT SCARY!!! FOR ME!!!! I'm too well train to take care horror.

 

  Anyways, the story is brilliant, well paced (but maybe too slow of some), and good written main character with character changes. Great animation and beautiful use of colour. Bad stuff. The villain. TOO CHILDISH!!!! Not even very frightening, like playing slenderman in noob mode in daylight without slenderman. Either way, it's great.

 

  OWW!!! My NECK!!!! ******* bastards shot me with paintball. Damn.

post #15337 of 16041

Life of Pi (2012). 8/10. Directed by Ang Lee. Fantastic.

 

Young Mr. Lincoln (1939). 7.5/10. Directed by John Ford. Henry Fonda stars. Loved it. Very moving.

 

eta rating


Edited by fractus2 - 3/26/14 at 6:55am
post #15338 of 16041

I wasn't sure what to make of the wide range of reviews I'd read about this one, particularly those who said they found it boring. I didn't find it boring at all...great cast, fantastic acting, robust characters, solid writing...I thought it was very well done. I wouldn't call this a GREAT film, but it was very good and I enjoyed it. I was most impressed with Christian Bale...he's a very talented dude. 

 

"American Hustle" - 8.4/10

 

 

post #15339 of 16041

the second hunger games... i give it a 7/10

post #15340 of 16041
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0059358/

"King Rat" from 1965, based on a book by James Clavell (Of "Shogun" fame). James Clavell really was a POW in Changi prison, and the character of Lt. Marlow (James Fox) is loosely based on Clavell's own experiences. I really enjoyed this classic B&W WWII POW film. It is not a highly rated film, but I think it should be. It is much less heroic than films like "Bridge over the River Kwai", and much more gritty than the "The Great Escape" (Clavell was a co-writer on "The Great Escape"). Corporal King (George Segal) is not a hero, and I suspect that's one of the reasons the film confuses some folks. In fact, no one in this film is a hero, not even Marlow - they *are* survivors, and that's what this film is all about. This movie didn't make me start marching around the room being proud my side won the war, but it did make me hope that humans become smart enough to never want to go to war again.
post #15341 of 16041

Singham ( 2011, India) 8/10

 

 

This film is known for its "like a boss" scene:

 

 

 

In Russia many people decided to watch Singham because of YouTube video called Beer is Evil where a user made up very funny Russian subtitles to it. 

 

 

The movie despite its ridiculous fighting scenes is charismatic, entertaining and sincere.


Edited by mutabor - 3/23/14 at 9:50am
post #15342 of 16041

Rewatched Peckinpah's Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid and The Wild Bunch (8.5/10) with commentary. Fascinating. With PG&BtK, they talk about all of the versions of the film, one released solely on laser disc. Lets see, the theatrical version, Peckinpah's preview version, Turner version based on the preview version, but missing the scene with Garrett and his wife in their home, and the 2005 special edition. I think a couple of the guys doing the commentary actually did the editing for the special edition version. Great insight into both films. Amazing that The Wild Bunch was filmed in 81 days. Both with amazing casts.

 

eta wild bunch rating


Edited by fractus2 - 3/26/14 at 6:55am
post #15343 of 16041

The Rescuers down under: 8.56/10

 

  This is the most unpopular Disney Renascence ever film, and one of the animated sequel to put on screen. As you know, Disney sucks at sequel without Pixar (and even they suck big time with Cars 2). And so I check it out. IT IS GREAT! The action scene is amazingly drawn, particularly flying scene. The story is a adventure movie, like Indiana Jones. In conclusion, you should check it out. Its got visuals and simple story that will never goes spiral to the trashcan.

 

  By the way, my laptop beats speakers are emitting smells when playing electronic songs in 100%, so am I destroying it?

post #15344 of 16041

Thor: The Dark World (2013): 5/10

 

Like all of the Avengers films, the characters here are a lot more fun than the plot. Some of the Avengers films (Iron Man, The Avengers) do a better job at striking exactly the balance these films need in order to remain entertaining; others do not. This one does not. As was the case with the first Thor film, the characters here are a lot of fun--even the ones that weren't great the first time around (Loki) have had a lot of time to grow into their roles, and they're genuinely great here. (Though Natalie Portman is still sadly out of place, and Loki's involvement in the plot mostly serves to introduce twists.) On the surface this film seems to have a better dramatic arc than the first film, but its execution is worse, and considerably draggier/noisier. How much better this film would have been if it had spent more time on the small moments that make the Avengers films so much fun: like the subway scene here, and less time on, well, everything else.

 

Captain America: The First Avenger (2011): 7/10

 

Eleven-years old me would have loved this--as I currently am, I still sort of like it. Nazi villains (led by Hugo Weaving, who never fails to make a good villain), good (well, bad, but you know what I mean) one-liners, neat set-design, and of course, lots of slow-motion escapes from explosions. It's dopey, big-hearted action, and is so gloriously goofy that it's hard not to love. I've never been a Captain America fan, but this film does the character's heritage justice, while updating it for modern audiences.

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014): 9/10

 

It's no less decorated, fussy, and curiously chaotic in that remarkably controlled way than Wes Anderson's films always are--if you hate his films for their constricting style, than this won't make you a believer. If anything, this might be the most Anderson movie yet, taking as it does his general approach to live-action filming but also incorporating some storybook-esque miniature filming and even a smidgeon of stop-motion. (Perhaps the one scene that might surprise is a downhill skiing chase scene, which makes liberal use of CGI.) But in other ways, Anderson beefs up his dramatic storytelling abilities with moments of genuinely disturbing power. Sudden explosions of violence aren't altogether uncommon in Anderson's pictures, but they've never been as gristly as they are here. (In other words, if the dead dog in Moonrise Kingdom was too much for you, you might have some issues with a few scenes here.) Yes, these violent outbursts are darkly funny, as always, but they're also horrifying and a tad bit gory, and Anderson proves himself to be surprisingly good at generating tension in the scenes leading up to these outbursts. One suspects that he might actually be capable of filming a good, if decidedly oddball, thriller, if he ever put his mind to it. 

 

But that's not all there is to Grand Budapest. Anderson's films have generally always been obsessed with loss or absence, and his characters must work together (they often fail when they try individually) to overcome whatever absences haunt them. For all the sorrow in his films (caused by death of family or friends, destruction of home, lost chances, or even by simple ennui), things tend to work out positively for most of the principal characters involved. Wes's characters are frequently accused of being more akin to clockwork automatons than to actual people--I think that this is a strength of his work, rather than a flaw, as it illustrates (no matter how fantastically) perfectly well the armor that we equip ourselves with when we are faced with a world that we are too weak to tolerate. His characters are rarely strong--they're victims who play the role of victim-hood exceedingly well (even when appearing to take matters into their own hands), but they're always allowed to grow, and reach new emotional heights by the film's end. In Grand Budapest, things aren't so easy--in many ways, it's his most serious film, even if it is perhaps also his funniest (thanks in no small part to a fantastically controlled Ralph Fiennes). Set in and around an idyllic Eastern European hotel on the eve of war, the absences its characters ultimately suffer may never be recovered from, and the blackly comic violence I mentioned above is but a pale shadow compared to the horrors that we don't see plainly, but do plainly feel the after-effects of as the plot switches from past to 'present' and back again.

 

In no small fashion did this film remind me of Alan Moore's Lost Girls. No, The Grand Budapest Hotel is not an epic pornography about sexual awakening and experimentation, but the two works are otherwise extremely similar in tone, setting, and message. The final pages of Lost Girls constitute perhaps the most haunting and 'cinematic' moment in Moore's entire oeuvre, and the feeling that is expresses (this is the beauty and vitality that war takes from us, never to give it back) is effortlessly matched by Anderson here. If you're sympathetic to Wes's modus operandi this film will leave you aching, and not just with laughter. It might just be the purest expression of Anderson's craft that he's yet presented to us.


Edited by metalsonata - 3/23/14 at 3:11pm
post #15345 of 16041
Quote:
Originally Posted by fractus2 View Post
 

Rewatched Peckinpah's Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid and The Wild Bunch with commentary. Fascinating. With PG&BtK, they talk about all of the versions of the film, one released solely on laser disc. Lets see, the theatrical version, Peckinpah's preview version, Turner version based on the preview version, but missing the scene with Garrett and his wife in their home, and the 2005 special edition. I think a couple of the guys doing the commentary actually did the editing for the special edition version. Great insight into both films. Amazing that The Wild Bunch was filmed in 81 days. Both with amazing casts.

 Watch this one next!


Edited by martin vegas - 3/23/14 at 3:04pm
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