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post #15241 of 16082

Andrei Rublev (1966) - 9,5

 

Masterpiece from Tarkovsky.
Period film set in the Middle Age period loosely based on the life of the artist referenced by the title, one of the most important painters to ever live in Russia. This film is dense and quite nuanced, probably unfair for me to describe it's essence in few words because I feel I still haven't dissected all it's substance, I want to see it again soon. Very briefly, it seems an essay about the roles and relationship of Art and Faith in that particular socio-religious construct, about the character of a true artist and it's endurances to remain truthful to oneself no matter what happens in one's life, the implications and symbolisms can be extrapolated to a personal and universal scale. Unlike Solaris and Stalker, Andrei Rublev does never feel like it's dragging it's pace, there's always something happening worthy of attention so, fortunately, no unnecessary torture. Thank to this and the cinematic accomplishment I feel easily emerged in this film, the other 2 are somewaht delicate and fragile in this aspect...


There's just one thing that leaves me cold, I miss some emotional engagement, this aspect very much contributes to the charm and appeal of a work of cinema at least for me. But Tarkovsky works aren't gifted with appreciable degree of sentimentalism (probably judged unnecessary in light of the director premisses) there seems to be a barrier separating the viewer from the characters preventing us from predicting rich/profound emotional cores and relations, his films are relatively cold, emotionally austere and distant holding the viewer in a perspective where it's easier to critically analyse the events than to feel like one is part of that world and is experiencing the human interactions in first hand. The acting is competent but not very deep. Can't really critique but it's very apparent to me in Andrei Rublev, there are several opportunities for potential development of a character or group of characters emotional canvas, but just when this seems to happen or is about to, there's a shift of attention to another subject. Seems like this is inherent to Tarkovsky cinematic language and I noticed this on his previous 2 works as well, not distracting per se, just a particularity of Tarkovksy intelectual stance that affects me in his movies and can either bore or cause fascination or just make me feel emotionally unsatisfied, depending on the movie. Very noticeable when comparing Andrei Rublev and Bergman's The Seventh Seal, a film it shares substantial thematic gist with. Bergman has great generosity of feeling and emotion without becoming cheesy but Tarkovsky in contrast seems distant, almost inert...


This is one of those things that could leave a lot of people bored or unimpressed with Andrei Rublev, but paying attention to the intelectual nuance and great cinematic artistry at display the reward more than overcomes the lack of emotion and fully justifies the movie as it is. This russian director makes very personal cinema, he doesn't flash the juice in our face we have to look for it, otherwise it's hard to figure out what makes his movies singular.

 

Andrei Rublev is technically impeccable which is amazing considering the difficulty and complexity of moving forward all the logistical resource needed to lift a movie of this scale. Camera and cinematography work are top notch and I already have an idea of Tarkovsky style, the black levels are quite poor but I still like the picture very much, the sound work has the hallmark of Tarkovsky as well, the voices up in the mix to highlight the dialogues a peculiarity that requires just a bit of familiarization, the scenarios are commendable and contribute to the epic scale of the movie. Everything is so well crafted and directed that despite Tarkovsky tendency to put me in a distant and analytical position, I feel engaged in that believable and authentic world as if in a dream.
Without a doubt a major work of cinema.
I love it and highly recommend!


So much that I'm forced to revise some previous ratings in order to better express my subjective feeling towards each movie level of accomplishment.

 

Revaluations

2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) - 9,5
The Seventh Seal (1957) - 9,5
Stalker (1979) - 9
Solaris (1972) - 9


Edited by kkl10 - 3/7/14 at 2:46pm
post #15242 of 16082

Good review on Andrei Rublev. It's a damn hard film to sum up in a limited space lol.

post #15243 of 16082
True, on the other hand you can sum up The Seventh Seal in just one song.

http://www.last.fm/music/Scott+Walker/_/The+Seventh+Seal
post #15244 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Andrei Rublev (1966) - 9,5

 

There's just one thing that leaves me cold, I miss some emotional engagement, this aspect very much contributes to the charm and appeal of a work of cinema at least for me. But Tarkovsky works aren't gifted with appreciable degree of sentimentalism (probably judged unnecessary in light of the director premisses) there seems to be a barrier separating the viewer from the characters preventing us from predicting rich/profound emotional cores and relations, his films are relatively cold, emotionally austere and distant holding the viewer in a perspective where it's easier to critically analyse the events than to feel like one is part of that world and is experiencing the human interactions in first hand. 

 

I think that the reasons of lack of emotional engagement are 1) cultural barriers and 2) personal emotional sensibilities. I remember you criticized A Separation ( Asghar Farhadi) for the same reason - lack of emotional engagement.

 

I personally felt completely engaged and connected to Andrei Rublev ( and A Separation as well). First of all Russian is my first language. The theme of the movie ( connection of Art and Faith) is very close to me. Then there were scenes with mongol aggressors where I watched my close ethnic relatives - mongols - invading Russia. It was like watching myself ( historically) from the side.

 

When I recently started to watch Mongolian Pop music on YouTube I personally found Mongolian language to be the most pleasant of Eastern Asian languages which I've heard ( Chinese, Korean, Japanese, Thai etc. sound funny for me).

 

 

 

post #15245 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Good review on Andrei Rublev. It's a damn hard film to sum up in a limited space lol.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post
 

 

I think that the reasons of lack of emotional engagement are 1) cultural barriers and 2) personal emotional sensibilities. I remember you criticized A Separation ( Asghar Farhadi) for the same reason - lack of emotional engagement.

 

I personally felt completely engaged and connected to Andrei Rublev ( and A Separation as well). First of all Russian is my first language. The theme of the movie ( connection of Art and Faith) is very close to me. Then there were scenes with mongol aggressors where I watched my close ethnic relatives - mongols - invading Russia. It was like watching myself ( historically) from the side.

 

 

Thx for the words.

I feel insecure about the quality of the text though, not sure if what I wrote is easilly understood by those who read it, not sure how it "flows" to you and also not sure that I wrote exactly what I wanted to express...

Seeing the review again I wish I didn't make so much effort to explain the lack of emotional engadgement, I wanted to put into words something I have an hard time explaining, it was just whimsical flamboyance on my part lol. It almost seems like I mixed up things that have nothing to do with what I was trying to convey so you might have gotten the wrong idea... didn't write much about the film itself... now it's done I won't bother changing it.

 

If you have any criticism or comment to point out on my writing competence or style or ortography please do.

Lately I find myself a bit surprised with the size of these small reviews, I don't plan them to be this big... guess I'm getting the taste of it.

 

I felt like in Andrei Rublev and other Tarkovsky movies the lack of emotional engadgement comes down to his particular cinematic language and probably my own sensibilities, not so much cultural barriers...

But it could be that I don't know how to "read" Tarkovsky right yet... there are still powerful moments in his movies that evoke feelings on me. Ambiguous cinema you know...


Edited by kkl10 - 3/7/14 at 6:13am
post #15246 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Za Warudo View Post

True, on the other hand you can sum up The Seventh Seal in just one song.

http://www.last.fm/music/Scott+Walker/_/The+Seventh+Seal

 

I wouldn't agree :P.

But very nice song I believe I have this Scott 4 album.

Love Scott Walker music, especially his later stuff.

post #15247 of 16082

Gravity 8 /10 

 

Really fantastic visuals, putting you there in space with them. Really amazing in that respect. 

 

I'm knocking 2 stars off for the appalling script. And George Clooney.

post #15248 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by LugBug1 View Post
 

 

 

I'm knocking 2 stars off for the appalling script. And George Clooney.

 

LOL!! 

post #15249 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post
 

 

LOL!! 


George Clooney was only good in ER..sorry but he should have stayed in tv!

post #15250 of 16082

The Wind Rises (English Dub): 7/10

 

 It's a solid movie. A visual delight with incredible animation; I couldn't find a single flaw there. It's a Studio Ghibli film, so that's to be expected. The sound was spot on perfect -- I was not expecting that at all, and some scenes really surprised me with the sheer detail that was presented.

 

What kind of bothered me was the tone of the movie; which I found to be aloof considering the subject matter of the movie (primarily dealing with the era just before WW2).

 

I don't really have a solid opinion about how the writer dealt with the war; but I do like how they presented Jiro, the main character, as someone who wanted to -just- design planes, not tools of war. It's the issue of morality when going into such fields; sure the goals are met or exceeded, but for what ends?

 

Anywho, I loved each and every character in the film. I recommend a watching if you're interested in history, anime, or love watching movies about engineering.

post #15251 of 16082
Quote:
Originally Posted by martin vegas View Post
 


George Clooney was only good in ER..sorry but he should have stayed in tv!

 

 

I'm with ya...I find him incredibly annoying and a very one dimensional actor. 

post #15252 of 16082

Several months ago, History of the Eagles parts I and II pretty much moved to the top of my list for the best music documentary I've seen over the last decade. I can't say this one is in that league, but that's due in large part to the fact that it's an entirely different focus. This was meant to be a documentary about the creation of the album, "This is War", but it ended up being that "plus". The plus part is the struggle to break free from EMI records and the subsequent lawsuit that they were confronted with. 

 

At first I was really thinking it was a bit of a puff piece, but then it took hold and I felt ended up being a very solid film about a band that I knew next to nothing about. I know Jared Leto for his acting, not his music. After seeing it, though, I have to say that I have come to see him in a new light. He's not only a very good actor, but an even better vocalist. Some of the actors who also perform seem to be of average talent when it comes to the musical side of their abilities, and thus is can be hard for me to really appreciate them as an artist. But Leto really surprised me and I was thoroughly impressed by his songwriting and vocal skills. I ended up buying the album that was created during the time of the filming and look forward to hearing more of his band's work. 

 

"Artifact" - 8.3/10

 

post #15253 of 16082

"Nebraska [7.6/10]: I enjoyed the film for a Saturday night pay-per-view. I have always liked Bruce Dern. There was nothing radically different about the story. It's been done in various forms over time. The story wasn't as profound or as insightful as I expected. I had read a review that compared it to "The Grapes Of Wrath." It wasn't even close, but worth a watch if you watch most of the newer releases...


Edited by DLeeWebb - 3/9/14 at 10:42am
post #15254 of 16082

The Big Lebowski (1998): 7/10

 

Overrated by its fans. Sure it's insanely quotable, chock-full of memorable characters, features some very nice cinematography (the likes of which you typically don't get in comedies like this), and has a few scenes of truly great comedy, but the plot is a thin excuse to move from one good line to the next, and the film has its fair share of clunky moments (the dream sequences, the framing narrative, the way the plot resolves).

 

The Proposition (2005): 8/10

 

Roger Ebert described it as a Western moved from Colorado to Hell. That sounds about right.

 

Prisoners (2013): 8/10

 

Wide swathes of this film are absolutely ridiculous--many of its twists, turns, and developments strain at the edges of what I'd consider to be believable, and its ham-fisted symbolism (almost painfully allegorical at moments) and characterization, especially in the case of Hugh Jackman's character, would be enough to sink most films. Luckily, this isn't most films--director Villeneuve displays masterful tension-generating abilities, the acting is top-notch, the script *works* even with its holes and utter lack of subtlety, and the cinematography is more than award-worthy--I was not surprised to learn that it was the work of Roger Deakins, who's been directly responsible for some of the best looking films of recent years (Skyfall, No Country For Old Men, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, and Jarhead, just to name a few). On the acting--I think people will generally react most strongly to Jackman's performance--I've never seen him this dynamic before. That said, I think it's Gyllenhaal who steals the show here--with the help of the make-up team, he takes what I can only imagine was a dull character on paper and turns him into a detective that you'll remember. In sum: this is a hugely flawed movie, but it's been so expertly put together in spite of its problems that if you can suspend your disbelief for its running length I think you'll come out of it pretty damn impressed. 

 

The Past (2013): 9/10

 

Between this and A Separation, Asghar Farhadi makes a strong case for being the best dramatic director currently working right now. Not that The Past isn't without its flaws: the pacing, superb throughout, finally stumbles towards the film's end as the focus shifts somewhat dramatically, and despite a fine performance from Ali Mosaffa (not the same actor who played the primary protagonist in A Separation, as I originally thought) , the character of Ahmad seems a little *too* perfect, and he's largely forgotten by the script in the film's final stretch. Still, make a point of seeing this movie. It's a stunner. 

post #15255 of 16082

Blue is the Warmest Colour - 5

 

A story unfolds, nothing happens.

Curiously I didn't notice the 3 hours running by, throughout the movie I felt in constant state of expectation, ie, I expected it to justify itself or at least to show any redeeming cinematic merit at any moment... I didn't see anything.

To me this is soap opera disguised as cinema with explicit sex scenes to spice up things a bit.

The nice cinematography and the good overall acting (not brilliant) are the only things I appreciated.

I think it's overrrated.

 

 

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