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post #14821 of 16189

I just saw the movie Semi-Pro with Will Ferrell in it and it was quite a bit better than I thought it was going to be.

post #14822 of 16189

Had no idea what to expect with this, but gave in to all the strong ratings...ended up having a lot of fun with it. 

 

 

"The History of Future Folk" - 8.2/10

 

 

post #14823 of 16189
^been wanting to watch that, will do after the two I was earlier recommended, also seems as if you had a lot of free time on Netflix... tongue.gif
post #14824 of 16189

"Short Term 12"     10/10

 

post #14825 of 16189

8.5/10

 

post #14826 of 16189

"Inside Llewn Davis" [7.0/10]: I was really interested in the topic. I was really interested in the music. I tend to love Coen Brothers' movies. However, I was a little disappointed in this film. I must say though that I have found that, at least with me, all of the Coen Brothers' films tend to get better with subsequent viewings. (I remember liking "Fargo," Burn After Reading," and "O Brother Where Art Thou" at the initial viewing...) Their films always strike me as being worth a second watch and the second watch tends to reveal subtleties that are not apparent during the initial viewing. I reserve the right to change my opinion at a later date, but for now I'm calling it a "C-."

post #14827 of 16189

Les Diaboliques (1955) - 8

 

Henri-Georges Clouzot film that inspired Hitchcock to make Psycho.

As a movie intending to play with the viewer's nerves it's a much more accomplished than Psycho and has all the merit in the way it achieves so.

Very sagacious, it never runs into the error of predictability nor does it give too many clues contrary to Psycho, I even felt a guilty pleasure from it's genially diabolical final, lol, it left me with a grin on my face.

It's cinematic style, however, is a bit dated and less fleshed out than the beautiful Psycho, so it has less aesthetic appeal.

If it had the same fleshed out aesthetics as Psycho, it would be perfect.

 

 

Psycho (1960) - 8

 

It is not accomplished like Les Diabolique as an horror movie and to it's detriment is very popular already so has less power of persuasion.

But, it is a more pleasant cinematic experience because it's filmed in a trully wonderfull fashion.

Very fleshed out aesthetics, great photography, beautiful scenes, excelent music score (appart from the awfully excited parts) and all around acting.

The opening scene, for example, from a panoramic view of the city to the picking inside the lovers room through the window, culminating with Marion Crane lying in bed is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen and heard.

I get the feeling that Hitchcock knew how to take shots better than necessarily creating suspense or horror... at least in the few movies I've seen from him, some are filmed like true masterpieces of classic cinema... but all this beauty could prove to be counterproductive on a horror movie, dunno...

In Psycho, Hitchcock wanted to explore the psychological aspect of crimes and I think that Anthony Perkins acting was perfect to give credibility to the movie premisse.

Acting, in general, is pretty good, but once in a while some characters seem to force a certain mood or to give clues in an unnatural way. This is congruent with my acting impressions of most Hitchcock films I've seen, sometimes it's all too much denounced and given away, in my opinion this shouldn't be desirable nor is the best way to create suspense because it just makes the film more predictable.


Edited by kkl10 - 1/20/14 at 10:52am
post #14828 of 16189
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

Les Diaboliques (1955) - 8

 

Henri-Georges Clouzot film that inspired Hitchcock to make Psycho.

As a movie intending to play with the viewer's nerves it's a much more accomplished than Psycho and has all the merit in the way it achieves so.

Very sagacious, it never runs into the error of predictability nor does it give too many clues contrary to Psycho, I even felt a guilty pleasure from it's genially diabolical final, lol, it left me with a grin on my face.

It's cinematic style, however, is a bit dated and less fleshed out than the beautiful Psycho, so it has less aesthetic appeal.

If it had the same fleshed out aesthetics as Psycho, it would be perfect.

 

 

Psycho (1960) - 8

 

It is not accomplished like Les Diabolique as an horror movie and to it's detriment is very popular already so has less power of persuasion.

But, it is a more pleasant cinematic experience because it's filmed in a trully wonderfull fashion.

Very fleshed out aesthetics, great photography, beautiful scenes, excelent music score (appart from the awfully excited parts) and all around acting.

The opening scene, for example, from a panoramic view of the city to the picking inside the lovers room through the window, culminating with Marion Crane lying in bed is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen and heard.

I get the feeling that Hitchcock knew how to take shots better than necessarily creating suspense or horror... at least in the few movies I've seen from him, some are filmed like true masterpieces of classic cinema... but all this beauty could prove to be counterproductive on a horror movie, dunno...

In Psycho, Hitchcock wanted to explore the psychological aspect of crimes and I think that Anthony Perkins acting was perfect to give credibility to the movie premisse.

Acting, in general, is pretty good, but once in a while some characters seem to force a certain mood or to give clues in an unnatural way. This is congruent with my acting impressions of most Hitchcock films I've seen, sometimes it's all too much denounced and given away, in my opinion this shouldn't be desirable nor is the best way to create suspense because it just makes the film more predictable.

Psychos a classic movie..one of the best!

post #14829 of 16189
Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit

9/10

Simply amazing.
post #14830 of 16189
Quote:
Originally Posted by kl10 View Post

 

 

Psycho (1960) - 8

 

It is not accomplished like Les Diabolic as an horror movie and to it's detriment is very popular already so has less power of persuasion.

But, it is a more pleasant cinematic experience because it's filmed in a truly wonder full fashion.

Very fleshed out aesthetics, great photography, beautiful scenes, excellent music score (app art from the awfully excited parts) and all around acting.

The opening scene, for example, from a panoramic view of the city to the picking inside the lovers room through the window, culminating with Marion Crane lying in bed is one of the most beautiful I've ever seen and heard.

I get the feeling that Hitchcock knew how to take shots better than necessarily creating suspense or horror... at least in the few movies I've seen from him, some are filmed like true masterpieces of classic cinema... but all this beauty could prove to be counterproductive on a horror movie, dunno...

In Psycho, Hitchcock wanted to explore the psychological aspect of crimes and I think that Anthony Perkins acting was perfect to give credibility to the movie premise.

Acting, in general, is pretty good, but once in a while some characters seem to force a certain mood or to give clues in an unnatural way. This is congruent with my acting impressions of most Hitchcock films I've seen, sometimes it's all too much denounced and given away, in my opinion this shouldn't be desirable nor is the best way to create suspense because it just makes the film more predictable.

 

 

One of the harder things to do is look at the movie Psycho in the mind-set of the viewer of when it came out. There had not been a horror movie of this type ever  before. If you research the history of the movie, it was a contagious theme and a genre breaker, setting a new level for a suspense movie, even though looked at as bad taste when it came out.

 

The studio walked away and Hitchcock ended up producing the movie himself due to his strong belief in the film. The general public was very innocent at the time and people were getting sick and running out of the theater. I personally rate it higher than an 8 just due to the experimentalist nature and the fact that Hitchcock pulled it off in grand form.

 

If you go back and see the huge library of Hitchcock films before it, you can see a gradual change in style and modernization or form, with the movie Psycho being an apex for the film maker.

 

The fact that on both sides of the Atlantic we were soon to experience a plethora of body count movies soon after, is a testament to the movies power and influence upon the film world in general.

post #14831 of 16189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

 

One of the harder things to do is look at the movie Psycho in the mind-set of the viewer of when it came out. There had not been a horror movie of this type ever  before. If you research the history of the movie, it was a contagious theme and a genre breaker, setting a new level for a suspense movie, even though looked at as bad taste when it came out.

 

The studio walked away and Hitchcock ended up producing the movie himself due to his strong belief in the film. The general public was very innocent at the time and people were getting sick and running out of the theater. I personally rate it higher than an 8 just due to the experimentalist nature and the fact that Hitchcock pulled it off in grand form.

 

If you go back and see the huge library of Hitchcock films before it, you can see a gradual change in style and modernization or form, with the movie Psycho being an apex for the film maker.

 

The fact that on both sides of the Atlantic we were soon to experience a plethora of body count movies soon after, is a testament to the movies power and influence upon the film world in general.

A perfect example of the movies influence was Jesus Franco's The Awful Dr. Orloff, the very first Spanish horror film. This movie set a style that Franco was to emulate for the remainder of his prolific creative output. It showed film viewers around the world that the body count genre can be flex-able and done in many creative ways, even on a low budge.  Finally the body count style coming into the mainstream with Paramount Pictures creation of the Friday The 13th series. A series the studio was not proud of but made huge sums of money at the box office.

 

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The Awful Dr. Orloff (Spanish: Gritos en la noche) is a 1962 Spanish–French horror film directed by Jesús Franco. It stars Howard Vernon as the mad Dr. Orloff (or sometimes Orlof) who wants to repair his disfigured daughter's face with skin grafts from others, with the aid of a slavish blind henchman named Morpho. The film is considered to be the earliest Spanish horror film.[4] Howard Vernon continued to appear in a number of Franco's horror films up until his death. Franco would later feature a number of blind or disfigured henchmen named Morpho in many of his later horror films, such as Vampyos Lesbos and Revenge in the House of Usher.


Edited by Redcarmoose - 1/20/14 at 8:50pm
post #14832 of 16189

I'm well aware of the story surrounding Psycho release and it's influence in the horror genre.

Naturally it was a greater novelty and had more power of persuasion at the time of it's release.

But I don't think it is as intelligent nor effective like Les Diaboliques as an horror and suspense movie, which also has it's share of influence on the genre.

What Psycho really premiered was a new level of sexuality and violence depiction on the screen that were not common at the time.

 

But the greatest asset of Psycho, in my opinion, is it's cinematic aesthetics and Mise-en-scène, it is trully a beautiful film to watch and in this aspect was also ahead of most movies at the time. It still manages to have a somewhat modern look nowadays, IMO.

Psycho is a great testament of Hitchcock masterful use of cinematic expression it showed how he really knew how to master the Mise-en-scène of a movie, I think this was one of his greatest talents as a filmmaker.

 

There is still another movie from 1960 that had great influence in the horror genre.

Eyes Without a Face, I've written impressions here, rated it 7 but I've been thinking about revising the rating higher.

This movie was also quite controversial at the time of it's release because of the unseen level of True gore depiction on the screen, in this aspect, it leaves Psycho and most other movies in the dust.

But it's also a very beautiful film to watch due to it's singular poetic beauty.

It's one of the most beautiful horror movies I've ever seen actually.

I bring it up because you mentioned The Awful Dr. Orloff... well this is a poor example of Psycho influence because it just so happens to be a flatout rip-off of Eyes Without a Face.

You can read the wikipedia article I linked, Legacy section, and see the influence this George Franju movie had in Franco filmmaking carrer and others.


Edited by kkl10 - 1/21/14 at 3:08am
post #14833 of 16189

Solid film...well acted and tense throughout. Yet another strong offering from overseas...

 

 

"The Hunt" - 8.8/10

 

 

post #14834 of 16189
Quote:
Originally Posted by kkl10 View Post
 

I'm well aware of the story surrounding Psycho release and it's influence in the horror genre.

Naturally it was a greater novelty and had more power of persuasion at the time of it's release.

But I don't think it is as intelligent nor effective like Les Diaboliques as an horror and suspense movie, which also has it's share of influence on the genre.

What Psycho really premiered was a new level of sexuality and violence depiction on the screen that were not common at the time.

 

But the greatest asset of Psycho, in my opinion, is it's cinematic aesthetics and Mise-en-scène, it is trully a beautiful film to watch and in this aspect was also ahead of most movies at the time. It still manages to have a somewhat modern look nowadays, IMO.

Psycho is a great testament of Hitchcock masterful use of cinematic expression it showed how he really knew how to master the Mise-en-scène of a movie, I think this was one of his greatest talents as a filmmaker.

 

There is still another movie from 1960 that had great influence in the horror genre.

Eyes Without a Face, I've written impressions here, rated it 7 but I've been thinking about revising the rating higher.

This movie was also quite controversial at the time of it's release because of the unseen level of True gore depiction on the screen, in this aspect, it leaves Psycho and most other movies in the dust.

But it's also a very beautiful film to watch due to it's singular poetic beauty.

It's one of the most beautiful horror movies I've ever seen actually.

I bring it up because you mentioned The Awful Dr. Orloff... well this is a poor example of Psycho influence because it just so happens to be a flatout rip-off of Eyes Without a Face.

You can read the wikipedia article I linked, Legacy section, and see the influence this George Franju movie had in Franco filmmaking carrer and others.

 

 

I have spent my years finding world horror and held the DVD of Eyes Without a Face but never purchased it. I will have to look into getting it. I keep thinking that is that woman with no eye brows? In the late 60s and early 1970s we as kids had Famous Monsters Of Filmland which always showed us stills and had information about so many movies. Many of the characters were noted but movies were such hard things to see.

 

Now days we are so lucky to have almost anything on film at our fingertips. If you know the title then often you can get the movie. Also over the last 15 years so many of the obscure films have been surprisingly put on DVD. I really have not watched my old DVDs as much as I should for the investment they were.

post #14835 of 16189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Redcarmoose View Post
 

 

 

I have spent my years finding world horror and held the DVD of Eyes Without a Face but never purchased it. I will have to look into getting it.

 

I highly recommend you do so!

It's a very beautiful movie, aesthetically it owes much to German Expressionism.

Here's where I found out about the movie, there are some screenshots of it. <- it's a great thread by the way, great resource for cinema.

If you can get the bluray I'd suggest so.


Edited by kkl10 - 1/21/14 at 3:59am
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