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post #14551 of 16183

"The Good Girl" Jennifer Anniston

 

Very well done black comedy. I really enjoyed it.  can see why it isn't well known, however. Maybe a little bit too gloomy. 4/5, but not one I would watch again.

post #14552 of 16183

Beauty and the Beast (1946): 9/10

 

A marvelous little oddity--certainly one of the most memorable film adaptations of a fairy tale out there. Aspects of the production have not aged well (the overacting and minimal interior design of the Beast's castle are the two biggest offenders), but its trick shots still have the power to astound (Belle exploring the Beast's castle is an especially beautiful sequence), and the Beast is marvelously tactile and soulful in ways that modern special effects creations rarely are. Its moral ambiguity will frustrate some viewers (I wonder what children and their parents thought of it when it was first released?), as will the stilted emotional development of the characters, which at least the Beast mostly makes up for with one of the most sorrowful and pathetic death soliloquies I've seen on film. Still, this is a fine film, a genuine curiosity that's hard not to admire. 

post #14553 of 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post

Beauty and the Beast (1946): 9/10

A marvelous little oddity--certainly one of the most memorable film adaptations of a fairy tale out there. Aspects of the production have not aged well (the overacting and minimal interior design of the Beast's castle are the two biggest offenders), but its trick shots still have the power to astound (Belle exploring the Beast's castle is an especially beautiful sequence), and the Beast is marvelously tactile and soulful in ways that modern special effects creations rarely are. Its moral ambiguity will frustrate some viewers (I wonder what children and their parents thought of it when it was first released?), as will the stilted emotional development of the characters, which at least the Beast mostly makes up for with one of the most sorrowful and pathetic death soliloquies I've seen on film. Still, this is a fine film, a genuine curiosity that's hard not to admire. 

Love the review. Thanks for that.
post #14554 of 16183

"Revenge of the Ninja" (1983).  For what it is, it's a classic filled with nostalgia.  And thanks to a two 16.9 oz cans of Kirin Ichiban, it received a solid 8/10 from a 6/10. Did I mention when I was kid, my first occupation was to become a ninja?

post #14555 of 16183

soliloliliques whaaaat lol. I only recently saw the Disney version I got tempted to see this :). How is the image quality do it survive a 51" TV?

post #14556 of 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by oqvist View Post
 

soliloliliques whaaaat lol. I only recently saw the Disney version I got tempted to see this :). How is the image quality do it survive a 51" TV?

 

I don't own a TV that large, but the easiest version to find on DVD/Blu-Ray is the one from Criterion Collection, who are generally well-respected for the quality of their film clean-ups and restoration. It looked great to me--particularly the surreal sequence when Belle first enters The Beast's castle. I believe the same restoration distributed by Criterion also got theatrical re-release a few years back. There are a few missing frames here and there, but that's hardly an uncommon thing when you're watching films this old. 

post #14557 of 16183
Escape Plan (2013) 7/10
Middle of the road Friday night entertainment that coasts on the two lead characters, it'll do.


Home Front (2013) 7.4/10
Stallone had a hand in this enjoyable, violent thriller with Jason Statham meting out the justice.

Edited by 5aces - 12/16/13 at 3:58pm
post #14558 of 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5aces View Post

Home Front (2013) 7.4/10
Stallone had a hand in this enjoyable, violent thriller with Jason Statham meting out the justice.

 

Is it any different from the usual Jason Statham formula?

post #14559 of 16183

^My exact thoughts.

post #14560 of 16183

Gangster squad! was a great movie. Wish we all still had a sense of fashion. 

 

brb wearing my sweats all day everyday 

post #14561 of 16183

Rashomon (1950): 9/10

 

I revisit it once every few years and it never fails to impress. While many films have tackled reality vs. perception as a central theme since this shook the film world up, few have done it with such beguiling style. Kurosawa and cinematographer Miyagawa created nothing less than a technical masterpiece here, particularly with regards to the use of natural light (frequently cast onto the actors' faces with mirrors) and shadow. (Have you ever seen such a claustrophobic production that was actually filmed outdoors?) There's one lengthy take early in the film that's dizzying in its perfection, where a camera on a dolly rail tracks the progress of the woodcutter character through a thick forest. I had to diagram it out on paper to try and figure out how the shot was accomplished after the first time I saw the film--the newer Criterion DVD, which I picked up last year, has an interview with the cinematographer that spills the beans on exactly how it was accomplished. (I wonder if the beans are similarly spilled on the well shot on the Red Beard DVD? I shall have to investigate!) And, as always, no one films rain better than Kurosawa. Of course, there's also a great script and interesting characters to be found here, but as is the case with many older Japanese films, the overly theatrical and exaggerated acting methods employed by the actors (especially by Toshiro Mifune, who was still a few years away from reaching his tremendous potential) have not aged well, and can result in some confusion for modern audiences. That said, Mifune also pulls off some of his most memorable expressions and body language here--when he is still, the camera tends to rest on him longer than any of the other principals, and for good reason. It doesn't take much imagination to see how he gathered so many fan-girls during his life. Highly recommended.


Edited by metalsonata - 12/16/13 at 10:09pm
post #14562 of 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post
 

Rashomon (1950): 9/10

 

I revisit it once every few years and it never fails to impress. While many films have tackled reality vs. perception as a central theme since this shook the film world up, few have done it with such beguiling style. Kurosawa and cinematographer Miyagawa created nothing less than a technical masterpiece here, particularly with regards to the use of natural light (frequently cast onto the actors' faces with mirrors) and shadow. (Have you ever seen such a claustrophobic production that was actually filmed outdoors?) There's one lengthy take early in the film that's dizzying in its perfection, where a camera on a dolly rail tracks the progress of the woodcutter character through a thick forest. I had to diagram it out on paper to try and figure out how the shot was accomplished after the first time I saw the film--the newer Criterion DVD, which I picked up last year, has an interview with the cinematographer that spills the beans on exactly how it was accomplished. (I wonder if the beans are similarly spilled on the well shot on the Red Beard DVD? I shall have to investigate!) And, as always, no one films rain better than Kurosawa. Of course, there's also a great script and interesting characters to be found here, but as is the case with many older Japanese films, the overly theatrical and exaggerated acting methods employed by the actors (especially by Toshiro Mifune, who was still a few years away from reaching his tremendous potential) have not aged well, and can result in some confusion for modern audiences. That said, Mifune also pulls off some of his most memorable expressions and body language here--when he is still, the camera tends to rest on him longer than any of the other principals, and for good reason. It doesn't take much imagination to see how he gathered so many fan-girls during his life. Highly recommended.

I'm going to have to watch that... it sounds really wonderful! 

post #14563 of 16183

The intouchables for the 4th time. I have actually never seen it at home. 10/10 though it´s extremely sexistic in the disguise of humour but who cares :) 

post #14564 of 16183

Mosquito Coast - 9.5/10

 

Haven't seen this since I was maybe 15 or so (i'm now 33). I remember very few things about it.

Have to say that I liked almost every minute of this.

 

Harrison Ford's character is a real nut and I swear that I have a few "friends" on my Facebook page just like him.

I really need to see more Peter Weir movies. The script for this one was also written by Paul Schrader (Who also wrote Taxi Driver..I think).

 

BTW I went through the whole movie not realizing his wife was Helen Mirren! Didn't even look like her. Probably because this was made in the 80s.

 

Why can't we have more movies similar to this?

post #14565 of 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by proton007 View Post

Is it any different from the usual Jason Statham formula?

Straight up B movie and one of the better Jason Statham roles.
In fact there are a few good roles here with the rest of the movie holding up surprisingly well, I thought.

As with most of his stuff, you pretty much know where things are headed without much complexity.
Statham is an action figure that delivers consistently and I was not disappointed watching Home Front.
Edited by 5aces - 12/17/13 at 6:40pm
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