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Rate The Last Movie You Watched - Page 893

post #13381 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by Achmedisdead View Post

That bad, huh? I'm assuming you went into it with appropriately lowered expectations, so it must really be a stinker. 

 

All parties involved mailed it in for this one, man...I remember seeing the original film three times when it was at the theater, just because I was so excited to take a different friend each time. Back then Bruce Willis was known mainly for his role in Moonlighting, so the idea of him in an action role was a strange idea. Needless to say, it paid off. I thought the first sequel was okay, but fell short of the original. The third one was a lot of fun, so thumbs up there, too. The fourth was also an enjoyable ride for me and I was happy to see the franchise continue on. This one? Absolutely stupid. I"m all for the idea of suspending disbelief, cause after all it's a movie for gosh sakes...but this one was so absurd that it was almost a parody on the first four films. I think they must have known it sucked, too, cause there were a couple of very subtle references to the original....almost like they were saying, "I know this one sucks, but remember how good the first one was?"  And the whole dynamic between him and his son was a cliche that just would not stop. 

 

I did have expectations that it wouldn't be up to the standard of the original, but usually what that means is that there is over the top action that is unrealistic, but you also get a fast paced story with a few laughs here and there along the way. In this one, they even failed to prevent John McLain from maintaining his likability, which usually goes a long way in terms of enjoying these films. This movie seemed to me like nothing more than a cash grab. The studio wanted to get one more payday on the back of this franchise, and in the process they just completely sharted themselves. 

 

Really, really disappointing. 

post #13382 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by grokit View Post

I forgot about Unbreakable, very underrated and one of my favorites by any director.

 

+1

 

I don't understand his fall from grace. The Sixth Sense is one of my favorite films ever, and seeing it without any knowledge of the film was a great experience. I was creeped out by Signs and completely engaged with that one, as well. Then it all started going downhill fast and he just can't seem to pull up out of this tailspin. That being said, I suspect he still has a lot of street cred with fans because of Sixth Sense, regardless of how much nonsense he's put on film since then. I always find myself interested to learn about his new projects, so I guess even with the stinkers he still is someone I find myself interested in. 

post #13383 of 16035

I sort of think he just got a big head. You could tell he was still really trying with both The Village (there is truly some very nice cinematography in that film) and The Lady in the Water, but with The Village he forgot that there is more to film-making then twist endings and pretty cinematography, and with Lady in the Water I think he was actually just lashing out at his critics. Casting himself in the role that he did certainly wasn't a subtle move on his part, nor was the fact that the whole film is supposedly based off a story he told to his children. And the critic character in that movie? Don't even get me started.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Focker View Post

 

+1

 

I don't understand his fall from grace. The Sixth Sense is one of my favorite films ever, and seeing it without any knowledge of the film was a great experience. I was creeped out by Signs and completely engaged with that one, as well. Then it all started going downhill fast and he just can't seem to pull up out of this tailspin. That being said, I suspect he still has a lot of street cred with fans because of Sixth Sense, regardless of how much nonsense he's put on film since then. I always find myself interested to learn about his new projects, so I guess even with the stinkers he still is someone I find myself interested in. 

post #13384 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalsonata View Post

And Lady in the Water might be one of the worst movies I've ever had the immense displeasure of watching. I felt as if I had been personally insulted after walking out of the theatre. 

 

Oh really? confused_face(1).gif It's not the first time when I read that this movie was someone's worst experience. It's almost like a cliche to make such a statement. I remember reading comments that people divided into two big camps who enjoyed the movie and who hated it. Either you love it or hate it thing.

 

I quite enjoyed Lady in Water. 

 

 

 

Quote:
but with The Village he forgot that there is more to film-making then twist endings and pretty cinematography

 

Personally for me The Village was not about twist ending which I didn't care or about pretty cinematography. It was about things you didn't mention. I think that he is good at presenting inner character development. Not the objective look from outside as it usually happening in the majority of movies ( with rare exceptions like The Master directed by Anderson) but Shyamalan is trying to convey what is invisible. Those who don't care about spirituality will find many faults in his direction missing his main strengths.

 

Gosh, I didn't like Man of Steel. Pathos of the movie started to kill my interest somewhere in the middle. After that I stopped being engaged and just coldly watched. There was a lot of going at the end but everything was just tiring and exhausting. I felt relieved when I left IMAX hall. Now I'm seriously considering to quit watching movies based on comics. On the other hand there were some which I quite liked, for example, the last Spider-man but it's an exception.


Edited by mutabor - 6/24/13 at 11:54am
post #13385 of 16035
End of Wach - 4/10

Boring mostly. Last scene was good I guess, but...meh.

Super - 9/10

God this was amazing. Cast was excellent. Last scene was phenominal! Whole thing was just great. So ****ed up.
post #13386 of 16035

I think Lady in the Water is targeted toward a very very specific group of people, and anyone who falls outside that group isn't going to just be 'meh' about it--they're going to hate it. I suspect that I happen to be about as far outside that ideal target audience as is possible, though it's worth noting that within my immediate circle of family and friends I'm the only one who despises the film--everyone else loves it. What did you enjoy about it? People I know loved it for its fairy-tale aspects--which I don't quite understand, given that I enjoy fairy tales as well, but found little in the film to love. It seemed *too* insistent with regards to the importance of stories and myths, but I found that, in spite of its insistence, it didn't do much to respect mythology and fairy tales (the supernatural aspects were all so forced, convoluted, and just *silly*), and instead wasted its time preemptively defending itself against criticism. I honestly just felt as if Shyamalan were trolling me, or more specifically, people who tend to approach most of their entertainment with skepticism. 

 

As for The Village, I'm not sure that your argument works, at least not for me. Two of my favorite directors are Andrei Tarkovsky and Ingmar Bergman, both obviously concerned with the spiritual life and inner workings of their characters and the worlds their characters inhabit. I don't believe that I am a conventionally spiritual person, but I find several works from both men to be intensely moving, particularly because of their detached, ponderous excavation of what I suppose most would call the human soul. I see little evidence of this inner character development present in Shyamalan's work, unless one willfully conflates moodiness with characterization, in which case, yes, the characters of The Village are quite moody, indeed. Perhaps Shyamalan is *interested* in such material, but there is an immense gulf between the inclusion of compelling themes in a film and the compelling *exploration* of such themes. You may not care about poor plot-twists and other such superficial ornamentation, but even if I agreed with you that Shyamalan was doing an intriguing job of charting the invisible, I would still come to the conclusion that his love of red herrings and plot twists cheapen the overall effect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mutabor View Post

 

Oh really? confused_face(1).gif It's not the first time when I read that this movie was someone's worst experience. It's almost like a cliche to make such a statement. I remember reading comments that people divided into two big camps who enjoyed the movie and who hated it. Either you love it or hate it thing.

 

I quite enjoyed Lady in Water. 

 

 

 

 

Personally for me The Village was not about twist ending which I didn't care or about pretty cinematography. It was about things you didn't mention. I think that he is good at presenting inner character development. Not the objective look from outside as it usually happening in the majority of movies ( with rare exceptions like The Master directed by Anderson) but Shyamalan is trying to convey what is invisible. Those who don't care about spirituality will find many faults in his direction missing his main strengths.

 

Gosh, I didn't like Man of Steel. Pathos of the movie started to kill my interest somewhere in the middle. After that I stopped being engaged and just coldly watched. There was a lot of going at the end but everything was just tiring and exhausting. I felt relieved when I left IMAX hall. Now I'm seriously considering to quit watching movies based on comics. On the other hand there were some which I quite liked, for example, the last Spider-man but it's an exception.

post #13387 of 16035
I loved Lady in the Water.
post #13388 of 16035

I thought it had its moments, definitely didn't hate it.

post #13389 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by MorbidToaster View Post


Super - 9/10

God this was amazing. Cast was excellent. Last scene was phenominal! Whole thing was just great. So ****ed up.

Loved Super. Hugely underrated superhero movie. Loved the scene with the brain surgery/tentacles.

Can't wait to see what James Gunn does with a huge budget for Guardians of the Galaxy.
post #13390 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by grokit View Post

And here I thought he was a marooned Kryptonian thriving under a yellow sun...


Jor even says "He is something the inhabitants and strive to be"

post #13391 of 16035

Back to Battan - 6/10

 

John Wayne WWII movie. Pretty terrible and too much propaganda. Not very realistic but at least they show the death march in the Philippines.

 

Operation Pacific - 5/10

 

In this one John Wayne actually saves two nuns and a some children and brings them onboard his sub. Yeah right...I highly doubt such things were even allowed.

John Wayne even comes back to the villagers with food and saves the day. Sure...

 

Only good John Wayne war movie i've seen is "In Harm's Way". At least that was based off a book.

 

Stalag 17 - 9/10

 

This one I didn't like that much the first viewing. The comedy was a bit different than I'm used to and found it not all that interested. I've seen it 3 times now and really like it a lot.

 

The Gallant Hours - 8/10

 

Old WWII movie about Admiral William Halsey. One of the first war movies i've seen with no actual combat footage. There's some interesting stuff in here about how they shot down Admiral Yamamoto after breaking the Japanese codes.

This is also one of the first older WWII movies where they didn't refer to the Japanese as the "Japs"! About time.

 

I just bought a boxed set of "Hogan's Heros". Wow, I just can't get into it. A comedy about POWs...I keep telling myself not to take any of it serious and then I can start to laugh at some parts. Not my type of comedy I guess.

post #13392 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

Back to Battan - 6/10

 

John Wayne WWII movie. Pretty terrible and too much propaganda. Not very realistic but at least they show the death march in the Philippines.

 

Operation Pacific - 5/10

 

In this one John Wayne actually saves two nuns and a some children and brings them onboard his sub. Yeah right...I highly doubt such things were even allowed.

John Wayne even comes back to the villagers with food and saves the day. Sure...

 

Only good John Wayne war movie i've seen is "In Harm's Way". At least that was based off a book.

 

Stalag 17 - 9/10

 

This one I didn't like that much the first viewing. The comedy was a bit different than I'm used to and found it not all that interested. I've seen it 3 times now and really like it a lot.

 

The Gallant Hours - 8/10

 

Old WWII movie about Admiral William Halsey. One of the first war movies i've seen with no actual combat footage. There's some interesting stuff in here about how they shot down Admiral Yamamoto after breaking the Japanese codes.

This is also one of the first older WWII movies where they didn't refer to the Japanese as the "Japs"! About time.

 

I just bought a boxed set of "Hogan's Heros". Wow, I just can't get into it. A comedy about POWs...I keep telling myself not to take any of it serious and then I can start to laugh at some parts. Not my type of comedy I guess.

World War ll obsessed?  Stalag 17 was great cinema, "Hogan's Heroes" was very loosely based on that movie. 


Edited by RUMAY408 - 6/26/13 at 12:34pm
post #13393 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUMAY408 View Post

World War ll obsessed?  Stalag 17 was great cinema, "Hogan's Heroes" was very loosely based on that movie. 

 

Not really. I think it's just that I've been reading up on it lately a lot. It seems that with WWII movies I can usually learn something new and still be entertained.

I also just finished the book "With the Old Breed" and just bought "Retribution".

 

I've found that old WWII movies are super cheap and easy to find too. I can get them at a used DVD store for usually a few dollars. I got a John Wayne WWII movie boxed set for just $5. Not too bad.

 

But yeah I think it's my goal to see as many WWII movies as I can biggrin.gif

post #13394 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdockweiler View Post

 

Not really. I think it's just that I've been reading up on it lately a lot. It seems that with WWII movies I can usually learn something new and still be entertained.

I also just finished the book "With the Old Breed" and just bought "Retribution".

 

I've found that old WWII movies are super cheap and easy to find too. I can get them at a used DVD store for usually a few dollars. I got a John Wayne WWII movie boxed set for just $5. Not too bad.

 

But yeah I think it's my goal to see as many WWII movies as I can biggrin.gif

I'm obsessed with WWll escape stories. The post was meant more as a "I know where you are coming from."  A must "The Great Escape" on film and "Escape From Colditz" in book form.  Colditz is so amazing I've read it 4X's. 

 

Very sorry about the derail.

post #13395 of 16035
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUMAY408 View Post
I'm obsessed with WWll escape stories. The post was meant more as a "I know where you are coming from."  A must "The Great Escape" on film and "Escape From Colditz" in book form.  Colditz is so amazing I've read it 4X's. 

I absolutely love "The Great Escape." No lie I must have watched it 25X in my life. Hey, it's more of a dramatized documentary, but being into escape stories, if you haven't seen the episode of the PBS series, "Secrets Of The Dead" called "Escape From Auschwitz," it's worth your time. I promise. You can watch the full episode here... http://video.pbs.org/video/1239472626

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