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how loud is 90db??? - Page 3

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tot View Post
The perceived difference is a bit subjective though, but I always use 10dB as double as loud.
I guess double the volume is completely subjective.

However I did hear about an experiment probing the hearing of a cat to measure the percieved volume increase in relation to the increase in decibels.

Or maybe I was dreaming at the time.
post #32 of 46
Even 80db is very loud! went to the audiologist yesterday and listened to her voice at 80db with closed headphones... I said "ow"...
post #33 of 46
You know, I've been thinking, it's pretty unacceptable that we all know so little (for certain) about our listening levels, considering how important our biological hearing apparatii are for enjoying any of this equipment, and considering how much money we pay for nuances, while at the same time destroying our capacity to hear them.

What do you guys think about doing a group comparison of our preferences for listening levels? We'd all have to be using the same equipment, then listen to the same music file as we walk around for a few days. Then we'd report back on our average listening level. For example, "I had my iPOD volume bar at about 40% the whole time." For equipment, I would suggest we use whatever is the most owned DAP/headphone... UMAMPED. I have an iPOD 5.5 with SE530s, but maybe that's not the most common combination around here? Of course, it is MY combination, so it has my vote! Would there be any way to use a software program instead of a DAP? We could get more people that way.

Edit: Note that the iPOD volume bar isn't ideal because it requires an estimate. A volume slider with tick marks or specific numbers would be better.


OK OK I'm getting ahead of myself and obviously I don't know much technical details to pull this off. So I'm putting it out there for someone more knowledgable to respond on if this is feasible. I realize it wouldn't prove anything. I just think it would be interesting to see how I stack up to all the rest of you in how loud I listen to my music.
post #34 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dexter Morgan View Post
You know, I've been thinking, it's pretty unacceptable that we all know so little (for certain) about our listening levels, considering how important our biological hearing apparatii are for enjoying any of this equipment, and considering how much money we pay for nuances, while at the same time destroying our capacity to hear them.

What do you guys think about doing a group comparison of our preferences for listening levels? We'd all have to be using the same equipment, then listen to the same music file as we walk around for a few days. Then we'd report back on our average listening level. For example, "I had my iPOD volume bar at about 40% the whole time." For equipment, I would suggest we use whatever is the most owned DAP/headphone... UMAMPED. I have an iPOD 5.5 with SE530s, but maybe that's not the most common combination around here? Of course, it is MY combination, so it has my vote! Would there be any way to use a software program instead of a DAP? We could get more people that way.

Edit: Note that the iPOD volume bar isn't ideal because it requires an estimate. A volume slider with tick marks or specific numbers would be better.


OK OK I'm getting ahead of myself and obviously I don't know much technical details to pull this off. So I'm putting it out there for someone more knowledgable to respond on if this is feasible. I realize it wouldn't prove anything. I just think it would be interesting to see how I stack up to all the rest of you in how loud I listen to my music.
x2,ill take part for sure. i have many iem's but also some iem's in my sig are not owned anymore so its down to you lot,im not sure how it will be sorted but hey is someone with a bit more knowledge has a blast at how we cud do it please share
post #35 of 46
search this forum a bit... a lot of ppl invested in a cheap db-meter and measured their levels (easy for full-sized HPs, less for IEMS)... way more reliable than your method and you will get instant feedback on the healthiness of your listening levels

BTW, I personally listen to very safe levels peaking at 65db, 75db max (ever) with my grados and alessandros
post #36 of 46
I would suggest that anyone who listens music more that let's say one hour per day should get or borrow a SPL meter to have some idea about listening levels.

Measuring an IEM SPL level is not doable, but even if you don't have headphones to measure and compare at least you would have an idea about sound levels.
post #37 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by jinx20001 View Post
i ask this question because i pulled my psp earphones out of the box today and there was a tag on them saying 90db max, i plugged them into my 5.5g ipod and couldnt hear a thing, so i turned the volume all the way up and i was astonished at how quiet these earphones were.

im used to listening mainly to shures se530 and ultimate ears 10 pro's and they are obviously no contest for those high end iem's but can anybody confirm the psp earphones are topping out at 90db and that volume is 90db because i am absolutely amazed at the low volume they produce and infact its scary because the other iem's i use would appear twice as loud at half the volume used.

or is it the fact i used an ipod to test them with?? i have not yet tried my psp because i dont use it for music or anything really

thanks all for any responses, i think it is important for people to realise exactly how loud 90db is, if the psp earphones are indeed topping at 90db i should be deaf by now
A few thing to keep in mind:

Normally something that makes a noise is measured to have a certain sound pressure at a certain distance. For example, a speaker may produce 88 dB one meter (3 feet or so) from the speaker front, with some given electrical input.

For headphones the only figure that makes sense is the sound pressure at the ear, so that's slightly different to how other sound sources are measured.

Different speakers and headphones produce different sound pressure levels ("dB") even with identical electrical input signals. That's why your headphones don't sound loud. The will only reach 90 dB given a strong enough amplifier.

Finally (for this short version), the perceived loudness depends on the average sound level, not the peaks. So some music sound louder because dynamic compression has been used to increase the average level.

Your ear, researchers say, takes damage from the average level. So if it sounds loud, it is loud to your ears! The ear can adjust amazingly to high sound pressure, but that doesn't mean they won't be damaged, so use more sense than I did and protect them during concerts! (Just something general on the end, not meant to imply that you don't!)
post #38 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by ranz_blacker View Post
90 DB is just like 100 DB... but a little less..
Quote:
Originally Posted by misterDX View Post
Are you retarded? 100db is 10 times as loud as 90db, think of 90db as a trailer truck coming over at 100km.hr from 10 meters away, thats pretty loud
exactly! since dB levels are on a logarithmic scale an increase in 10dB equates to a 10-fold increase in intensity...pretty loud, if you ask me.
post #39 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kugino View Post
exactly! since dB levels are on a logarithmic scale an increase in 10dB equates to a 10-fold increase in intensity...pretty loud, if you ask me.
Not 10 times as loud. Roughly twice as loud.
post #40 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by kugino View Post
exactly! since dB levels are on a logarithmic scale an increase in 10dB equates to a 10-fold increase in intensity...pretty loud, if you ask me.

Anyone know how ReplayGain works?


I know adding 3dBs shouldn't be half of adding 6dBs, but is it?
post #41 of 46
I would say that roughly

60dB conversation
70dB raised voice
80dB shouting
90dB shouting at your face
post #42 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chri5peed View Post
Anyone know how ReplayGain works?
It compares the average RMS level of the music to -20dbFS pink noise taking into account hearing sensitivity at 83dB SPL (or was it 89db) to have the same perceived loudness.

The gain number is the volume adjustment needed.
post #43 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tot View Post
6dB is the difference is the signal level is doubled. That means that power is quadrupled.

If you double the power, the increase is 3dB and the signal level increases by sqrt(2).

The perceived difference is a bit subjective though, but I always use 10dB as double as loud.
One of the few accurate pieces of information in this thread.

To the OP, you are dealing with an impedance mismatch and are not hearing 90db.
post #44 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chri5peed View Post
I know adding 3dBs shouldn't be half of adding 6dBs, but is it?
It's multiplying by half or adding a third.

Like...
3 x 2 x 2 = 12
3 + 9 = 12
whereas...
3 x 2 = 6
3 + 3 = 6
and 9 / 3 = 3, not 2... or something.
post #45 of 46

The decibel (dB) is a logarithmic unit..

 

If you check out: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decibel it may make more sense.

 

Everytime you step up 10dB you are effectively multiplying the power ratio by 10.

To find the amplitude ratio, take the square root of the power ratio.

 

To demonstrate the comparitive power of your headphones have a look at this chart:

http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/loudness.html

 

At 90dB your headphones should max out at  the equivalent of a train whistle at 500' or truck traffic.

 

 

Ipods are generally quite quiet.. You need to put them through a proper amp to test them out (turn it down first of course!!).

My old Ipod sounded so weak in comparison I could hear people on the back row of a bus chatting. (Kinda what I was trying to block out).

 

If they were cheap, then they won't sound amazing or put down a lot of power before they blow out.. But then I have had a go on headphones that cost quite a bit (rhymes with 'Leaks Lordio') and they are a complete con.. No detail, power, nothing..

Last pair of cans I bought cost less than £20 and sounded better than a pair I bought for £50!

 

If they turn out to be ok on an amp, best bet is to buy a portable headphone amp or even build one..

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-Cmoy-headphone-amp/

 

Good luck!

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