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Chef KNives? - Page 3

post #31 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Assorted View Post
This exceeds my entire iMod rig.

To quote the previous people, the knife that feels the best is the best knife for you, as long as you sharpen well with a sharpening stone. Using the honing steel in excess isn't ideal. Also, different knives for different purposes. Using a carving knife to slice and dice onions isn't a good idea. The only knife that's capable of all purpose without sharpening is the Chinese butcher knife.
Can't open you second picture. Looks like a very nice Deba. Who is the maker ?
post #32 of 66
Hi folks;

Let me misquote "The Graduate" to add my less than 2 cents...
"One word...Ceramics".

Ceramic knives are very sharp...very brittle..and fairly expensive. Good stuff used right none the less.

Bazile
post #33 of 66
Are there any coated knifes? Like perhaps diamond or silicon carbide knifes? Wouldn't you like a knife that'll never dull? Why have I never heard of those (besides the fact that I never read about knifes)?
post #34 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dept_of_Alchemy View Post
Are there any coated knifes? Like perhaps diamond or silicon carbide knifes? Wouldn't you like a knife that'll never dull? Why have I never heard of those (besides the fact that I never read about knifes)?
I suggest this link Sir;

http://www.mingspantry.com/kyoccerkniff.html

I'm not knife savvy personally. I do get to travel to Japan occasionally, and the lesser named (basically knock offs , I think) impress my knife collecting nephew.
I don't cook much at all. I do claim to be able to cook anything Swanson can freeze, but thats not much of an endorsement. basically ceramics are dang sharp knives with a few (significant) limits.

Baz
post #35 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazile View Post
I suggest this link Sir;

http://www.mingspantry.com/kyoccerkniff.html

I'm not knife savvy personally. I do get to travel to Japan occasionally, and the lesser named (basically knock offs , I think) impress my knife collecting nephew.
I don't cook much at all. I do claim to be able to cook anything Swanson can freeze, but thats not much of an endorsement. basically ceramics are dang sharp knives with a few (significant) limits.

Baz
Sounds like a pain to use. Wonder why with all these materials engineers around here no one's thought of fancier stuff.
post #36 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dept_of_Alchemy View Post
Sounds like a pain to use. Wonder why with all these materials engineers around here no one's thought of fancier stuff.
Knives have been the first item to recieve technological improvments, and have been for the last 8,000 years. Plastics, ceramics, titanium, cryonic freezing, superheating, laser sharpening, etc etc etc.

The fact remains that a steel knife remians the best knife mankind can produce. There are metalurgical changes made (for example: different amounts of chromium, iron, nickel), but it is still the same basic concept drafted 2600 years ago.
post #37 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef8489 View Post
Just currious if anyone else loves high end chef knives. I currently ahve a set of Hattori HD's and love them for work. I purchased a Harroti KD and it is on its way. I am not sure I will like it a much as the HD's and would be selling it or trading for something else( maybe ue-11 pro) Here is a link of the different knives.
KD
HD
So Chef,

It's been around 1/2 a year, so I assume you've received your KD and been using it? So how it feels compared to the 'cheaper' HD version?

I am seriously considering to get myself a HD Santoku to replace my Mundial Santoku. And you must have been chopping and dicing a lot, has the knife started to blunt?
post #38 of 66
With Shun and now these brands it looks like we are moving from knife-of-the-year to knife-of-the-month.

I had used traditional French pattern eight to ten inch Henckels and Wustoff chef's knives for decades. Wasn't too happy with the pattern and would get out the food processor pretty easily. Then I started watching the Food Network and saw everybody had gone to Santoku pattern blades between six and eight inches. What a difference!

Now I've got a titanium seven inch Boker and a eight inch hollow ground granton five star Henckels, both in Santoku pattern and the food processor is getting dusty. It's nothing to prep vegetables for eight to twelve portion meals. Cooking from scratch more and lovin' it!
post #39 of 66
question - i just got a magnetic knife rack...which direction should the knives be placed on the magnet? handle up or down? in the pics above the handles are up...but i've seen both. any thoughts?
post #40 of 66
Handles up (the sharp pointy knife facing up) makes more sense IMO, because you grab it by the handle. Less dangerous too. Whatever you do, don't place the knife on your foot.

Btw where's chef? Still waiting for his user's impression.
post #41 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by dj_mocok View Post
Handles up (the sharp pointy knife facing up) makes more sense IMO, because you grab it by the handle. Less dangerous too. Whatever you do, don't place the knife on your foot.

Btw where's chef? Still waiting for his user's impression.
wait, this doesn't make sense. handles up means the "sharp pointy knife" faces down, right? am i missing something?
post #42 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dj_mocok View Post
So Chef,

It's been around 1/2 a year, so I assume you've received your KD and been using it? So how it feels compared to the 'cheaper' HD version?

I am seriously considering to get myself a HD Santoku to replace my Mundial Santoku. And you must have been chopping and dicing a lot, has the knife started to blunt?
I did recieve my KD ant it was amazong, but I decided to sell it because I could not justify it over my HD's for the price. It is stronger than the HD's and stays sharper quite a bit longer.If one can afford them they are defently worth the price. It is so sharp I accidently cut myself while washing it. I barly grazed my finger and did nto feel anything. Next thing I knew wes I was gushing blood. I never seem to cut myself while using the knives, it is always when washing them.
post #43 of 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by chef8489 View Post
I did recieve my KD ant it was amazong, but I decided to sell it because I could not justify it over my HD's for the price. It is stronger than the HD's and stays sharper quite a bit longer.If one can afford them they are defently worth the price. It is so sharp I accidently cut myself while washing it. I barly grazed my finger and did nto feel anything. Next thing I knew wes I was gushing blood. I never seem to cut myself while using the knives, it is always when washing them.
No, I can't afford KD series, I think it's more of a special collector's item to me. I'd probably get the HD.

The knife is THAT sharp you cut yourself and didn't feel anything? Now you are scaring me, lol. Just wondering, can we sharpen the KD with those regular sharpening block - the diamond coated one? That's the only sharpener I got. Worked okay with my current knife but I'm not sure if this knife needs special sharpener.

I checked the sharpener from their site it's so expensive.


Kugino: Sorry to confuse you, depends on how you look at it, so in your case handle down and pointy knife up then, hehe...
post #44 of 66
Gotta love the Hattori knifes, sharp as razor blades and nice to handle

You should really use whetstones for sharpening these babies though.
post #45 of 66
The KSC-75 of Chef knives would be the Global series. Very light compared to German knives which makes them less tiresome over time. Shun are intermediate. Japanese knives have a sharper bevel than German ones, which requires more robust steel and care. Anthony Bourdain swears by them.

Otherwise the Kyocera Kyotop series is amazing, they keep their sharpness essentially forever. Remember to always use it on a cutting board, and not to cut something with bones.
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