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Job Interview-Fi

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
After applying for so many positions in these past few weeks, I finally got the call for an interview tomorrow morning.
The closest interview I got was when I applied for a retail assistant job at Target. But this one is for a Graduate position in a banking company. Damn I'm already nervous now....

Any tips what I should do or should bring or what to say or what to wear? Any tips will be appreciated. Arghhh! hopefully I could nail it. I swear if I got the job I'm gonna make a head-fi giveaway to celebrate, hehe...

Thanks in advance guys.
post #2 of 46
I don't know how they do interviews in Australia, but for the jobs that I've gotten interviews for, behavioral interviews were the norm.

If this is the same in Australia, my suggestion is to find a list of common behavioral interview questions and kind of prepare yourself to answer them. Don't completely memorize answers because that becomes apparent, but know general answers. These questions, if you haven't been exposed to them, typically ask not what would you do but what did you do.

For example:
Give a specific example where you worked with someone you didn't like and how did you deal with it.

They are looking for specific examples because they really aren't looking for BS answers. It's much harder to BS a story than it is to BS a standpoint!

ex: I would listen to all sides fairly and try to improve my handling of the situation as well as convincing the co-worker.

vs. His verbal taunts were getting to my nerves so I sat down and talked to him. etc etc etc. (It's obvious I made this one up cause it's so crummy! Use real examples and you'll stand out)


Tip 2:
Think up a number of questions to ask the interviewer. Typically, after my interviews the interviewer would ask, "So do you have any questions?". Not having a good question kind of makes it boring for the interviewer and doesn't show much interest. If you ask how life is, what their job is, and then keep on asking follow-up questions, the person is much more likely to remember you as "the guy who's really interested in our company" rather than "some random guy needing a job".

Tip 3:
Bring multiple copies of your resume and memorize what you've written down from top to bottom. Typically an interviewer will read in that order and it's good to know what kind of questions are coming up. The multiple copies are for if you happen to meet someone who could help you or if your resume was somehow lost. You'll look prepared and serious.

Tip 4:
Look nice! Make sure you get up a little early to get all cleaned up. Also, make sure you get a good breakfast and rest. You never know how long you'll have to interview before you can eat. It sucks being hungry in a long interview.


Good luck to you!
I'll be looking forward to interviews myself in a few weeks
post #3 of 46
As a bank manager in an expanding department I'm conducting about 2-3 interviews per week. The things that I'm looking most for is sincerity and assertiveness. Prepare yourself by going to your potential employers website and learn about the company. What do you like about it, what don't you like? After that you might look into the field that you will be working in. Are you good at it already? If not, what can you improve? Do you know people in the company? If so, call them! If not, there are networks on the internet (facebook, linkedin, where you can get lots of info from insiders). Google is your friend too...

The ultimate goal for me as boss is to see what added value a candidate has for my team. Does he/she ask the right questions? Is there a lot of "air" in his/her responses? It's okay if you don't know the answer to some questions but you have to know where to get them. Be confident about the things you wrote in your resume (but not too confident, I had a candidate once who'se goal it was to become CFO of the company, nice but not likely).

Good luck!
post #4 of 46
Great advice above.

Seriously, do not look or smell like a hobo.
post #5 of 46
just pretend that they are wasting your time, not the other way round, and that you begrudge being there and they are wasting your precious audio time, without being to pointed in that regard.

i often find that that reverse psychology works for me, otherwise i am too nervous and subordinate.

it helps bolster my natural introverted characted and levels it out to a normal degree.

depends on your character though...
post #6 of 46
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the tips, they are really good suggestions. One thing though, I just realised that this was for the Recruitment Company, so they are actually interviewing me, and then if I passed this, they would recommend me to the whatever company they hired me for and then did the real interview.

During interview, if they asked me what salary range do I expect, what should I say?

PS: How about bags? should I bring bag or it's okay just to carry a folder? Might be just me, but I find it weird to wear suit but carrying a folder in your hand..?
post #7 of 46
for banks, dress conservative - standard black suit/white dress shirt... nothing too fancy.
post #8 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dj_mocok View Post
During interview, if they asked me what salary range do I expect, what should I say?
Be completely honest. Do you know what the typical salary of this type of job is? Would you be willing to work for the company at less than that pay? If you have no clue what an appropriate salary is, I would do some research beforehand. It's not at all inappropriate to respond with actual numbers when someone asks what salary you're expecting. In fact, answering with "I was hoping for $60-$65k / year; does that sound reasonable to you?" is a much better answer then "Well, I'm not really sure what pay for this job is... what salary do you have in mind?". The former shows that you're experienced in the area and that you know what you want--the latter is far too passive an answer; it makes it extremely clear that you didn't do your homework.
post #9 of 46
Know the company and be interested in the persons you talk to. Ask about his/her background, history and motivation. Instead of a questioning > answering exercise.. try to get a real conversation. Two way, not one way. Built report. This will work. Trust me..I'm in recruitment for over 10 year now. Goodluck..
post #10 of 46
Bring a notebook and pen. Take notes on the important things people tell you. And remember, how you present yourself is equally, if not more important than what you say.
post #11 of 46
Thread Starter 
Just finished the interview; I guess I did okay, I'm not really sure. The recruitment consultant didn't give me much chance to ask question. She asked one question, and when I barely finished with it, she started with other one again.

It's not like she's rushing me or something, she's friendly, but I think she just didn't offer chance for you to ask much. And I didn't get the usual "anything you wanna ask about the job" ending, she just said so thank you again for the time, will let the company know about it, etc...

Maybe she wasn't really interested in me, I don't know. But anyway, I got a telephone interview this Friday from different company, so if this one fails, I hope the other one will be fine.
post #12 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dj_mocok View Post
Just finished the interview; I guess I did okay, I'm not really sure. The recruitment consultant didn't give me much chance to ask question. She asked one question, and when I barely finished with it, she started with other one again.

It's not like she's rushing me or something, she's friendly, but I think she just didn't offer chance for you to ask much. And I didn't get the usual "anything you wanna ask about the job" ending, she just said so thank you again for the time, will let the company know about it, etc...

Maybe she wasn't really interested in me, I don't know. But anyway, I got a telephone interview this Friday from different company, so if this one fails, I hope the other one will be fine.
First one's the hardest. Good luck young man! Keep plugging!
post #13 of 46
You want to be taken seriously for sure. BUT, when I'm interviewing people so many people are too afraid to just flat out be their normal likeable selves. Be charismatic, it will go a long long way.
post #14 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ingwe View Post
First one's the hardest. Good luck young man! Keep plugging!
Thanks. Actually before she started the interview, she asked me whether I've done interviews before, and I told her yes (well, I did, but not for "real job") because I didn't wanna let her assume that I'd perform bad because it's my 1st one. But I also let her know that I got another interview for a different company on this Friday.

Just wondering, when they ask you the usual "What's your strength" and "What's your weakness" questions, what did you guys have for answers?

Me, strength, I mentioned the usual hard working, keen to learn something new, good team player, bla bla...
weakness, I told her that I realise that my english pronounciation (or speaking skills) may not be as accurate as native speakers, but what I'm lacking of, I make it up in working harder than those people.
post #15 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dj_mocok View Post
Just finished the interview; I guess I did okay, I'm not really sure. The recruitment consultant didn't give me much chance to ask question. She asked one question, and when I barely finished with it, she started with other one again.

It's not like she's rushing me or something, she's friendly, but I think she just didn't offer chance for you to ask much. And I didn't get the usual "anything you wanna ask about the job" ending, she just said so thank you again for the time, will let the company know about it, etc...

Maybe she wasn't really interested in me, I don't know. But anyway, I got a telephone interview this Friday from different company, so if this one fails, I hope the other one will be fine.
I own a staffing company and it sounds to me as if the person who interviewed you really was looking for the most basic level of job compatibility, i.e., can you fog a mirror. If they determine that you can fog the mirror they'll pass your name to the client company and then you'll get your real interview. There are staffing companies and there are staffing companies. We really focus on knowing our client's jobs and properly screening the candidates. We actively look for the best fit between job and employee in both hard and soft skills. That's what our clients are paying for. From your description of the first interview, it didn't sound like much of a staffing company. You'll have to compensate for the staffing company's apathetic approach by really shining with your enthusiasm and passion.

Go get 'em man! Really! They're probably so used to seeing low grade candidates from that staffing company that you need to shine like the noon day sun. You can do it! The suggestions above in this thread have been very good.
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