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facts or marketing? iPod classic couldn't get better sound even with modification - Page 4

post #46 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by YoungClayB View Post
In the end, you really need to be able to listen for yourself and make your own decision. There is A LOT of hoopla here on head-fi regarding sound quality differences and the price that each of us is willing to pay to get there.
So true. You can put me in the cynics camp when it comes to claims of eargasm and other over-top-gushings of improvement in sound. They might indeed be real, but I'll hear it first, thank you, before agreeing.
post #47 of 105
After I went to my first meet I realized that the storied "HUGE" differences were hardly noticeable for me and certainly not worth the big bux necessary to achieve them.
I am thankful that I found this out before spending more than I already have.
I am therefore content with my setup (easy for me to say with the Kenwood, I know) and any upgrade will be for storage or features rather than a pursuit of some holy grail SQ that doesn't exist (for me anyway).

Having said that.....
To each their own. If questing for the ultimate sound floats yer boat, more power to ya.
post #48 of 105
I came to understand the same thing, it's all just music, how different can the same music sound right? And a lot of the differences are small, and the vast majority of the population can't hear the differences between gear. Many don't even believe there are differences.

Some people can hear those differences which change the experience of music to a sufficient degree to make the expense seem good value to them. Those people are audiophiles. The rest just enjoy music.
post #49 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevenkelby View Post
Some people can hear those differences which change the experience of music to a sufficient degree to make the expense seem good value to them. Those people are audiophiles. The rest just enjoy music.
I disagree. Spending a ton of money does not make one an audiophile.
I can stop right where I am and never buy another source or headphone and I will still consider myself an audiophile. Enjoying music is being an audiophile to one degree or another.
What you describe is an equipmentphile or something. Many of them love their equipment far more than the music. Indeed, the music is a remote second place.
post #50 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Night Surfer View Post
I disagree. Spending a ton of money does not make one an audiophile.
I can stop right where I am and never buy another source or headphone and I will still consider myself an audiophile. Enjoying music is being an audiophile to one degree or another.
What you describe is an equipmentphile or something. Many of them love their equipment far more than the music. Indeed, the music is a remote second place.

You misunderstand me. Or more likely, I didn't say what I meant. I meant that an audiophile (to me of course, should have said that) is someone that cares about being able to hear the music reproduced as well as possible, and that is able to hear, and appreciate those differences. Those improvements in sound are also considered to be "worth it" to an audiophile. That doesn't mean that they spend any extra money at all, just that they would if they could, and would appreciate the improvements.

Some people love music and need it 24/7, know all the words, hear all the sounds and truly enjoy the music, but are happy to listen to stock buds and 128 mp3s. There's nothing at all wrong with that of course, but that isn't an audiophile to me, but I'm not saying I know for sure. Sorry if my post sounded like that.
post #51 of 105
No, it's cool. I think your definition is more accurate, or at least how it is understood by most.
post #52 of 105
There is probably a line somewhere between music enthusiast and audiophile. A very, very, very fuzzy line .

Each to his own, right?
post #53 of 105
I don't think there is a clear definition. Straight translation: audiophile = lover of music.

I don't like people necessarily calling me an audiophile right now and I couldn't tell you what category I fit into. I just appreciate good equipment to the point of being anal about it. How is that for a definition?
post #54 of 105
In Spanish we have a different word it is "melómano" and "audiofilo" for audiohile. "Melomano" can be translated as music lover, and "audiofilo" as audio lover. Since in Spanish we have that marked word distinction, I have always separated both meanings and always thought that an audiophile's interest is more centered on how it sounds, how the individual sounds are perceived by him and how they affect the mood, how his gear reproduces said sounds and thus you can simply say that they are different approaches or loving the same thing: one trough a holistic view (the music, the melody) and the other as a reductionistic view (the details, the sounds).

Of course that doesn't mean that one cannot love and identify the other qualities, of course not! I would simply say that the approaches are different and hence, the path to achieve the same goals (enjoying music) is very different.

But being noth thing is what would be really rewarding, right?
post #55 of 105
We spend a lot of money just to bring us close to the the music we love.
Music is exist long before hi-fi, I just want my equipment to bring me close to the music,Robert Johnson's, Bernstein's in '60, young Miles' etc ,like travel back with time machine, I think that audiophile is all about.
post #56 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Night Surfer View Post
...What you describe is an equipmentphile or something. Many of them love their equipment far more than the music. Indeed, the music is a remote second place.
Indeed. Back when I was in college, I was going down the equipmentophile route, constantly spending every penny I had on ever better stuff. It got to the point where I would listen only to a very small selection of music because there were not many recordings that could do my equipment justice. Then one day it hit me. I was listening to my equipment, using the music as a vehicle to do that. It should be the other way around!
post #57 of 105
Guys, don't forget that the art of listening is an ART. Everyone hears differently. That's the nature of this hobby.

It's more like Picasso painting, some people could cry and stare at those paintings for hours and hours and willing to pay million dollar for it. To me, I feel nothing when looking at those painting.

So with sound is pretty much the same. Some people are gifted(to Enjoy Music) or cursed(to spend more from headfi) with exceptional hearing, and they could really hear big differences among equipments.

My wife couldn't even tell the difference between ipod bud Vs E500/Triple.fi. To her all sounded the same.

Any of you go for an annual hearing check up to an audiologist? I do mine every year, and also getting my wax cleaned up as a bonus. That wax build up does affect clarity.
post #58 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Night Surfer View Post
I disagree. Spending a ton of money does not make one an audiophile.
I can stop right where I am and never buy another source or headphone and I will still consider myself an audiophile. Enjoying music is being an audiophile to one degree or another.
What you describe is an equipmentphile or something. Many of them love their equipment far more than the music. Indeed, the music is a remote second place.
Come on, an Audiophile is for those who are constantly changing audio gears and collecting them, analysing criticizing all the time, hopefully to get a better sound each time. Musicians are also not the same as audiophile. There are people who criticize music as well. That’s why there are things like car forums, music forums, audiophile forums. If those people can stop buying then I don’t think they are an audiophile and I don’t think headfi is a really suitable forum for them. As for myself, I don’t like going into a car forum. It doesn’t spark me any interest. Some people keep on upgrading their car components like shock breaker, Nitro and so on. But to me I’m happy with any standard car.

How about this analogy. You love stamps, but you don't buy any stamps around the world, and you consider yourself as a Stamp collector?
Or
You love painting, but you have only one painting at home? Hmmm,
Or
Wine, I'm very bad with wine testing either, I cannot really appreciate those higher price wine.

You see an audiophile, or stamp collector freak, or golf freak, or alike, will spend whatever it takes to continuously improve to whatever they think better provided they have the money, the time, and the resource. Some people even spend millions of dollar on what they consider as their passions.

I thought I would share my 0.02

post #59 of 105
there is another factor involved its we have spent more money
being a newer piece of equipment or mod or high dollar interconnector what ever so it naturally sounds better no one
wants to admit that there was no change or it was not as good
after spending their hard earned money.
post #60 of 105
I agree, we need to stop listening to our equipment, and to the freaking music.

I am using a laptop with terrible speakers, they sound really bad. But I was browsing the internet, and a song I liked on a site popped up, a low encoded MP3 (not really low, like around 192), and it didn't sound good, but I still enjoyed it.
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