Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Post Your Photography Here #2 (new dial-up 800X600 friendly)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Post Your Photography Here #2 (new dial-up 800X600 friendly) - Page 758

post #11356 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorseNamedJeff View Post

For shutter vibration troubles on a tripod, just do a two second timer or use a remote.

I actually ordered a remote so my hand won't be on it, and yeah I program the AF on the AEL button so I can push the shutter then wait 2secs. I was just wondering whether, given how strong that small shutter feels when I take a shot, if it might vibrate enough down through the (cheap) tripod (that doesn't have all the fancy rubber dampening) then back up to the cam and lens. Seems no one's actually got a problem like this so I'm considering that lens right now.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMinor View Post

9mm? Holy cow. Are you shooting full frames?

I'm not even aware of Fx lenses that go that wide....afaik isn't the widest non-fisheye lens the 14mm AIS (and now the 14-24mm) on FX?
post #11357 of 12574

From what I read here, I assume that you people know a lot more about cameras than me.
I've been looking into mirrorless system cameras lately and I'm very intrigued by the Sony NEX-6.
But here is my problem....

Would this fine camera really be a big step up from my trusty Sony RX100?

I don't plan to go all crazy on buying a lot of expensive lenses for it. I read that the kit lense is pretty good and I might want to buy an additional macro lense.

Any other suggestions? My budget is ca. $900.

post #11358 of 12574

The NEX-6 is a great camera.  It would only be a step up if you plan on buying additional lenses.  The only limitation with the NEX system is the limited selection of lenses.  You may also want to look into the Micro 4/3 system which is shared by Olympus and Panasonic.  There is a ton of aftermarket lens support for the M4/3 system as well.

post #11359 of 12574

The RX100 is a pretty darned good camera, Why do you want to switch from it?

post #11360 of 12574

More pictures please  :D 

post #11361 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorseNamedJeff View Post
 

The RX100 is a pretty darned good camera, Why do you want to switch from it?

Hmmm something with better low-light and macro capabilities would be nice.....that's pretty much it.

I've just been looking into system cameras to see if one of these woukd be a huge upgrade for a rasonable price.
No real plans to buy one any soon.

post #11362 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post
 

Hmmm something with better low-light and macro capabilities would be nice.....that's pretty much it.

I've just been looking into system cameras to see if one of these woukd be a huge upgrade for a rasonable price.
No real plans to buy one any soon.

 

For better macro and low light capability you need a system with interchangeable lenses so you can buy some "fast glass."

post #11363 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post

Hmmm something with better low-light and macro capabilities would be nice.....that's pretty much it.


I've just been looking into system cameras to see if one of these woukd be a huge upgrade for a rasonable price.

No real plans to buy one any soon.

A few things to consider though. In terms of low light capability, the advantage of a large sensor system cam like the NEX6 is that has an EVF. That helps the ergos (you can anchor it to your cheeks), and also EVF cams have an AF and live view that boosts the ISO temporarily for the EVF and AF to help composition and focusing* then takes the shot at the ISO you set manually.

On the other hand, with kit zooms and large sensor cams vs premium compacts the gap for low light performance in practice might not be as wide as you might think. If anything, the pop-up flash is more powerful and can be tilted to bounce off the ceiling. Lenses 1-stop brighter than the kit zoom are much larger than the kit lens - Sony can cram an APS-C sensor into a body the size of micro 4/3, but the lenses aren'tt getting smaller than that especially when they favor zooms (even Fuji's tiny lenses are either built into the X100 or aren't stunningly sharp like the 18mm pancake). For macro work I still suggest having a quality tripod, that way for stationary subjects you can use low ISO and longer exposure. I tend to prefer colors shot at low ambient light at long exposure times.

I was considering the NEX6 too but my needs were very different. I didn't like the plastic body, although it's tough, but I was planning to use a metal, superwide RF lens on it (plus they still had some purple corners like the NEX7). I'm probably just going to wait for later APS-C, EVF cams til all the kinks are worked out.

*on older cams meant for daylight street shooting like the E-P2/1, that doesn't help the fact that it doesn't have an AF beam (omitted presumably because what street shooter will want to blind his subject? until you realize you also use it in other situations and your friends' iPhones worked better during that party)
post #11364 of 12574

https://fbcdn-sphotos-e-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/1380771_300886133386982_273167041_n.jpg

 

I dunno, far from great but still pretty decent for a simple iPhone

post #11365 of 12574

 

 


Edited by matthewh133 - 9/29/13 at 2:43am
post #11366 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post


A few things to consider though. In terms of low light capability, the advantage of a large sensor system cam like the NEX6 is that has an EVF. That helps the ergos (you can anchor it to your cheeks), and also EVF cams have an AF and live view that boosts the ISO temporarily for the EVF and AF to help composition and focusing* then takes the shot at the ISO you set manually.

On the other hand, with kit zooms and large sensor cams vs premium compacts the gap for low light performance in practice might not be as wide as you might think. If anything, the pop-up flash is more powerful and can be tilted to bounce off the ceiling. Lenses 1-stop brighter than the kit zoom are much larger than the kit lens - Sony can cram an APS-C sensor into a body the size of micro 4/3, but the lenses aren'tt getting smaller than that especially when they favor zooms (even Fuji's tiny lenses are either built into the X100 or aren't stunningly sharp like the 18mm pancake). For macro work I still suggest having a quality tripod, that way for stationary subjects you can use low ISO and longer exposure. I tend to prefer colors shot at low ambient light at long exposure times.

I was considering the NEX6 too but my needs were very different. I didn't like the plastic body, although it's tough, but I was planning to use a metal, superwide RF lens on it (plus they still had some purple corners like the NEX7). I'm probably just going to wait for later APS-C, EVF cams til all the kinks are worked out.

*on older cams meant for daylight street shooting like the E-P2/1, that doesn't help the fact that it doesn't have an AF beam (omitted presumably because what street shooter will want to blind his subject? until you realize you also use it in other situations and your friends' iPhones worked better during that party)


Hmmm sounds like I would have to invest quiet a bit more than I thought for the big upgrade I was hoping for.
I think I will drop my plans for now and see what nifty little cameras will come out in the near future.

Instead I'll buy myself one of these cool little MagFilters for my RX100 and toy around with some ND and polarization filters :)



More pictures!

post #11367 of 12574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post
 


Hmmm sounds like I would have to invest quiet a bit more than I thought for the big upgrade I was hoping for.
I think I will drop my plans for now and see what nifty little cameras will come out in the near future.

Instead I'll buy myself one of these cool little MagFilters for my RX100 and toy around with some ND and polarization filters :)

 

Oh, one thing I forgot - the EVF's are very useful in daylight shooting where the sun would otherwise washout the LCD. The thing is, maybe you should also look into micro4/3 and CX-format cameras - most of their primes and now the powered kit zooms at least are much smaller than E-mount lenses that the package as a whole won't be too far off from a compact cam if you use these.  Compare the size of the 24/1.8 E-mount to the 17/1.8 Olympus, and the 20/1.7 and 14/2.5 from Panasonic. The 45/2.8 Leica-Panasonic and the Sony macro are comparable though, but with the micro4/3 primes you can leave those mounted in most compact bags and just mount the macro when you need it.

post #11368 of 12574

 

One shot that I was pretty proud of.

post #11369 of 12574

Vampire Puppy

 

10013533253_fcc87432d0_z.jpg

post #11370 of 12574

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
Head-Fi.org › Forums › Misc.-Category Forums › Members' Lounge (General Discussion) › Post Your Photography Here #2 (new dial-up 800X600 friendly)