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post #10846 of 12339

Been looking at some places for nice deals and came up with this one, Canon EOS Digital Rebel T3i 18MP SLR Camera w/ 18-55mm IS II Lens (Refurbished) for $520 - $125 off in cart = $395

 

Would anyone rate this better than the Sony NEX F3 or the Panny GX1?  I mean in term of PQ and easy of use.

post #10847 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neogeo333 View Post

Been looking at some places for nice deals and came up with this one, Canon EOS Digital Rebel T3i 18MP SLR Camera w/ 18-55mm IS II Lens (Refurbished) for $520 - $125 off in cart = $395

 

Would anyone rate this better than the Sony NEX F3 or the Panny GX1?  I mean in term of PQ and easy of use.

 

For the same money I'd go for the GX1. Body can be had for about $250 off Amazon these days, 14mm lens for another $250 or less (check eBay also). Electronic viewfinder for another $200 or so.

BTW you might want to start a new thread, we'll get too many off-topic posts on this.

post #10848 of 12339
I've Shot on the NEX series, and let me tell you hwut. It's great. It really is like a baby dslr. Get that deal, then buy an E-mount 50mm lens.
post #10849 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by AHorseNamedJeff View Post

I've Shot on the NEX series, and let me tell you hwut. It's great. It really is like a baby dslr. Get that deal, then buy an E-mount 50mm lens.

Pictures please of the camera and from the camerawink.gif

post #10850 of 12339
Haha don't have the pictures, just tested it at my friends house. A mirror less will always be easier to use than a DSLR, albeit not as powerful.
post #10851 of 12339

I think that still, DSLRs have the edge: they focus faster and overall, react more quickly. I'd love for that not to be the case. Notable almost-exceptions are Nikon's V1 and the Oly EM5. Those two are ALMOST as fast, but not quite so. They remain harder to focus manual lenses than a DSLR with a good OVF (expensive) but are much smaller.

 

I use a Fujifilm X-Pro 1 alongside my D800. I much prefer using the X, but the D800 is far easier to use.

post #10852 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by shigzeo View Post

I think that still, DSLRs have the edge: they focus faster and overall, react more quickly. I'd love for that not to be the case. Notable almost-exceptions are Nikon's V1 and the Oly EM5. Those two are ALMOST as fast, but not quite so. They remain harder to focus manual lenses than a DSLR with a good OVF (expensive) but are much smaller.

 

I use a Fujifilm X-Pro 1 alongside my D800. I much prefer using the X, but the D800 is far easier to use.

 

I'm still thinking to get either the X-Pro 1 or the X100s, more leaning on the X100s as it will probably cost me much less in the future.  Did you happen have a chance to compare them?

post #10853 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by shigzeo View Post

They remain harder to focus manual lenses than a DSLR with a good OVF (expensive) but are much smaller.

 

That's because of the lens construction. With DSLRs, the larger lenses still have a mechanical focus mechanism; mirrorless use a  focus-by-wire mechanism - essentially the same thing as on compact cameras - except they have a ring on the lens instead of the navigation scroller on the right thumb. Some of the newer Olympus lenses However, when it comes to manual focus, even most of the current DSLR lenses fail next to pure manual focus lenses for me - some newer DSLR lenses don't have a distance scale either and I usually prefocus the lens and adjust a little bit.

post #10854 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

That's because of the lens construction. With DSLRs, the larger lenses still have a mechanical focus mechanism; mirrorless use a  focus-by-wire mechanism - essentially the same thing as on compact cameras - except they have a ring on the lens instead of the navigation scroller on the right thumb. Some of the newer Olympus lenses However, when it comes to manual focus, even most of the current DSLR lenses fail next to pure manual focus lenses for me - some newer DSLR lenses don't have a distance scale either and I usually prefocus the lens and adjust a little bit.

My beloved compact camera has got a ring on the lens :(
A very useful ring.
And the manual focus with it works quiet good IMO.

post #10855 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Yum Goong View Post

My beloved compact camera has got a ring on the lens :(
A very useful ring.
And the manual focus with it works quiet good IMO.

 

Yep, some do, and some work smoother than others.

post #10856 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by jc9394 View Post

 

I'm still thinking to get either the X-Pro 1 or the X100s, more leaning on the X100s as it will probably cost me much less in the future.  Did you happen have a chance to compare them?

The X-Pro has the looks but none of the operation of the cameras it attempts to emulate. The good: threaded shutter tripper, external controls for exposure, and for decent framing, OVF. I don't own any of Fuji's lenses as I don't like to invest in lenses when I have a number of great L and M lenses that I've used on my rangefinder interchangeable cameras. I have the Canon 35/2 LTM M39, the Nikkor 10,5/2,5 LTM M39, the Zeiss 35/2 ZM, and the 12mm Voigt VM lens. Each are great but none are autofocus. The low res EVF of the X-Pro and reliance on magnified view that utilises the entire screen rather than a magnification window, means that it is very hard to frame a sharp shot with speed AND accuracy when using legacy lenses.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ProtegeManiac View Post

 

That's because of the lens construction. With DSLRs, the larger lenses still have a mechanical focus mechanism; mirrorless use a  focus-by-wire mechanism - essentially the same thing as on compact cameras - except they have a ring on the lens instead of the navigation scroller on the right thumb. Some of the newer Olympus lenses However, when it comes to manual focus, even most of the current DSLR lenses fail next to pure manual focus lenses for me - some newer DSLR lenses don't have a distance scale either and I usually prefocus the lens and adjust a little bit.

There are some SLR lenses from Canon that do not have mechanical focus rings. 

 

I'm referring to the very low resolution screens in mirrorless cameras, to their EVF size and clarity versus an OVF. I can focus 100% sharp images with my Nikkor 50/2 Ai lens on my D800, which has a crap OVF next to my FE. It is large, bright, and not hamstrung by pixels at all. The lens also 'pops' into focus. 

 

The other problem is magnified/contrast/highlight/peeking systems. I want: and OVF like the X-Pro coupled to a small magnified window showing only the focus area, leaving the rest for framing. Nothing like that exists now. My old Sony F505 had that function though without the OVF; it split functionality between magnified view and lens-view in the EVF. It was great. Peeking is a good idea, but is not nearly as accurate as a bright OVF. 

 

The only newschool lens I have is the 28-70/2,8ED from Nikon. It is a zoom and all automatic (my other SLR lenses have automatic aperture priority cooperative functionality of course) and I don't care for its manual focus feel or anything other than automatic focus accuracy. I only use it for weddings and sometimes, for what the Japanese call 'snapshots' at tight events. 

 

The lenses I use on mirrorless are the ones stated above. And, they shoot well, but the cameras they are attached to are not ready. No mirroless is as easy or fast to use as my Canon P, a 100% non-electronic camera. Why? Large 100% bright eye level viewfinder. That is amazing for framing. You don't squint to see what you are framing. No tunnel vision as with the X-Pro and most other mirroless (and even my D800 to a certain extent). It has a coupled rangefinder mechanism, so I can use that wonderful bright OVF and just line up the two images. That functionality is distinctly absent from all but the RD-D1 and Leica's cameras. I don't actually want a rangefinder camera. But with a decent (tiny but okay) OVF like the X-Pro 1 has, I'd love to be able to use legacy lenses from the OVF without 'guessing' hyperfocal lengths. 

 

I mistook its functionality. I thought that the overlay was multi-coloured and would be able to, with a firmware upgrade, utilise the EVF overlay to focus in a window... no such luck. It is a very very slow camera to use with legacy glass. So much slower than a 60 year old camera, a 30 year old camera, a 10 year old camera, or a brand new one. Fun, but absolutely crap when using old glass.

post #10857 of 12339
Quote:
Originally Posted by shigzeo View Post

 

I mistook its functionality. I thought that the overlay was multi-coloured and would be able to, with a firmware upgrade, utilise the EVF overlay to focus in a window... no such luck. It is a very very slow camera to use with legacy glass. So much slower than a 60 year old camera, a 30 year old camera, a 10 year old camera, or a brand new one. Fun, but absolutely crap when using old glass.

 

Yeah, unlike say a real rangefinder, the lens and the RF will work together to focus. OVF doesn't work for that; you'd need to switch to the laggy EVF. This is why I haven't really found a digital replacement for my old Canonet 45/1.7 - as far as ergos are concerned the X100 and X-Pro1 come close, but operationally, they don't. No distance scale to prefocus, much less get a TTL view/DOF preview to adjust accurately when necessary. Then, even if the overlay can give you accurate enough compensation for parallax, they can't focus fast enough. That's why when the E-P2 went on sale here I got it and the EVF instead of the X100; only later I realized the non-mechanical focusing is useless when you have moving subjects (and no distance scale, until the 12/2 came out) and the tilting EVF had the disadvantage of being precarious if mounted while inside some of my bags.

 

I had bright hopes for the E-P5, which rumors initially stated could have an offset EVF and thanks to the E-M5 might inherit some of its focusing tech, but it just came out with a new external tilting EVF. I'm watching the GX2 right now and hopefully it'll have the rumored built-in EVF, so I'd still have the same ergos of my Canonet, but more importantly I'll be able to use the M.Zuiko 17/1.8 or 12/2 lenses on it which the X-Series doesn't have (distance scale, and heck even my E-P2+VF2 barely has any lag compared to the X-E1).

post #10858 of 12339

Beauty dish cam left, softbox cam right.

 

EOSD3877

post #10859 of 12339

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-ash3/21356_266087323533530_1107873915_n.jpg

 

Not bad for a cheapo 99 cent picture editing app

post #10860 of 12339




Edited by jbusuego - 6/29/13 at 6:09pm
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