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coffee gadgets... - Page 39

post #571 of 585

Sifting out the fines can help make a better cup, the fines tend to get over extracted due to their super small size.

 

I like the travel setup, and the v60 is my favourite method of making coffee. As far as the Skertons grind goes, I did a bit of modification on my Hario Skerton to get the grinds better, but the grind in the article looks pretty good.   

post #572 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by anoobis View Post

More as an aside now, I found this interesting http://boingboing.net/2010/09/30/perfecting-my-travel.html

Anyone concur or disagree?

 

 

I both concur and disagree.

 

He says a couple of things that indicate while he might be a self proclaimed "coffee snob" he's also not very knowledgeable on the subject as a whole.  That's normal for people who call themselves "coffee snobs" though, similar to people who call themselves "wine snobs".  In general they may have deep knowledge in a very narrow slice of the coffee world, and even deeper passions regarding it, but not a wide ranging knowledge of coffee.

 

However, you're really asking about the setup right?

 

His setup is pretty good.  Certainly capable of making a very fine cup of coffee with high clarity.  For making good coffee his equipment choices are all great.

 

For an ideal travel set, though, I find it lacking.

 

I would switch out the Hario Pourover & Kalita drip kettle for the Clever Coffee Dripper.  I would also add a combination thermometer/timer, which is something he would have needed to truly get the most out of the setup he described; especially in a hotel room where water temperature control could potentially be very difficult.

 

The Clever Coffee Dripper (which he incorrectly calls a "Clever Coffee Maker") would be a more ideal travel option for a number of reasons:

  1. It's easier.  Some hotel rooms would be nightmares to use a Hario Pourover in.  Any hotel room (with a microwave) will be easy to use a Clever Coffee Dripper in.  No mucking about with elbow room, lighting, etc.  Travel can be stressful, unless you find taking several minutes of concentrated effort (with failure being a genuine possibility) to be soothing the Clever Coffee Dripper wins on this tip.
  2. It's far more flexible and forgiving.  The Hario Pourover is much like using highly analytical headphones; it will magnify any flaws in the coffee beans & grind.  So you really have to ensure you have very good beans on hand with the Hario.  If you're on a trip and you run out of beans, forcing a trip to the local super market you are screwed as the Hario will make "OK" beans taste like crap.  In addition not all beans work well with the Hario; some high quality blends and even single origin beans don't play nice with it at all.  The Clever Coffee Dripper, on the other hand, is very forgiving by comparison.  "OK" beans taste "OK" and all high quality beans taste good to great.  The best "grocery store beans" will taste OK (or even good depending on the store) in the Clever whereas it's highly likely to be a disaster with the Hario.
  3. It's less bulky.  The Hario requires both the Hario pourover and the drip kettle.  The Clever Coffee Dripper doesn't require any fancy kettle at all.

 

Just my thoughts though.  

post #573 of 585

i just bought a Moccamster KBG-741! So excited! Can't stand the world of expresso-nespresso-senseo-crap anymore! I need the real coffee smell in the morning as it was before! 

 

 

i'm so happy!!:beerchug:

post #574 of 585

I've had my Moccamaster for a few years now. Occasionally I am tempted by other coffee gadgetry, dials, buttons, gauges, steaming, high pressure gizmo devices but the Moccamaster does one thing and does it superbly...make great coffee even if it is a little basic.

post #575 of 585

thanks! It's great to have some feedback from someone who has it since i couple of years and is still happy with it!

:beerchug: 

 

i've been doing coffee for years with this 

so basic is fine! But need to have more cups in the morning, so that Misses does not get jealous ! :wink_face:


Edited by whoever - 12/30/13 at 8:30pm
post #576 of 585

I've had my Technivorm for several years as well.  Just make sure you descale it form time to time, and you'll be fine for years!.  I use Dezscal on the recommendation of Boyds Coffee (who are the US importers, iirc).  They sent me some for free, when I called them to get instructions as to how to send in the unit for repair when it stopped working.  Instead, they sent me this stuff, and an instruction sheet, and it works fine-- great company!!!

post #577 of 585

just discovered this corner of head-fi and it's taken a while to get through the thread...

 

I grind using a MAHLKÖNIG VARIO Grinder GENERATION II, which I assume is a Euro branding of the Baratza mentioned in this thread (it certainly looks the same to me). 

 

I do freeze whole beans (a risky statement on a first posting in in this thread, I know).

 

I also clean my grinder with Urnex Grindz Coffee Grinder Cleaning Tablets, but I have no idea whether it's worth it...

post #578 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by whoever View Post
 

i just bought a Moccamster KBG-741! So excited! Can't stand the world of expresso-nespresso-senseo-crap anymore! I need the real coffee smell in the morning as it was before! 

i'm so happy!!:beerchug:

I'm thoroughly frustrated by British coffee culture - most of my compatriots seem to have completely bought into the Starbucks mentality and the infantile jargon... and the awful awful coffee. I will say in their defence that the Starbucks coffee grinder I bought was both cheap and long-lived and is now my work grinder.

 

Once the admirable tea and coffee company Whittard started closing nearly all their shops a few years ago, I had trouble sourcing good beans. Thankfully, I persuaded the food market at St Pancras station (London), which I pass through on my daily commute to stock coffee beans (and ground coffee, for those who want that sort of thing) from the Monmouth Coffee Company.

 

I prefer to use a porcelain filter cone and paper filters, sending the first filtering through the cone a second time for a good rich brew (a tip from Brillat-Savarin). I mainly go for African peaberry beans from Kenya or Ethiopia, as the flavour is much more to my taste. The main trouble with this method is loss of heat, although the porcelain cone retains heat better than my old plastic cone. An electric hotplate that can be set to a low temperature is a good thing to have.

 

I do very occasionally chuck a cardamom pod or two in with the beans for grinding - heresy to some, but a habit I got from an Eastern European friend. It's a nice flavour combination as long as you don't overdo it.


Edited by PalJoey - 2/12/14 at 8:53am
post #579 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post
 

I'm thoroughly frustrated by British coffee culture - most of my compatriots seem to have completely bought into the Starbucks mentality and the infantile jargon... and the awful awful coffee. I will say in their defence that the Starbucks coffee grinder I bought was both cheap and long-lived and is now my work grinder.

 

Once the admirable tea and coffee company Whittard started closing nearly all their shops a few years ago, I had trouble sourcing good beans. Thankfully, I persuaded the food market at St Pancras station (London), which I pass through on my daily commute to stock coffee beans (and ground coffee, for those who want that sort of thing) from the Monmouth Coffee Company.

 

I prefer to use a porcelain filter cone and paper filters, sending the first filtering through the cone a second time for a good rich brew (a tip from Brillat-Savarin). I mainly go for African peaberry beans from Kenya or Ethiopia, as the flavour is much more to my taste. The main trouble with this method is loss of heat, although the porcelain cone retains heat better than my old plastic cone. An electric hotplate that can be set to a low temperature is a good thing to have.

 

I do very occasionally chuck a cardamom pod or two in with the beans for grinding - heresy to some, but a habit I got from an Eastern European friend. It's a nice flavour combination as long as you don't overdo it.

There are a few decent bean vendors in London. If you are near London Bridge, there's an actual Monmouth Coffee cafe where you can try a good range of beans and buy them in pretty much any quantity. There's also a decent place in soho (on old compton st I think), so it's not a complete loss...

post #580 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc-k View Post
 

There are a few decent bean vendors in London. If you are near London Bridge, there's an actual Monmouth Coffee cafe where you can try a good range of beans and buy them in pretty much any quantity. There's also a decent place in soho (on old compton st I think), so it's not a complete loss...


I'd love to get down to London Bridge and Borough Market more often, but the only time I can get there is on a saturday, when the place is rammed full of people.

 

Thank God for the guys at St Pancras for agreeing to sell coffee as well as just serving it. I just asked on the off-chance and they improvised a container, guesstimated the price and sold me the beans. A week or so later, there was a pre-bagged selection on offer. They always have their espresso beans, but the others vary from time to time. Ethiopian Kebel Konga was a recent one, which was superb.

 

The Sourced Market at the North end of the station is really worth checking out, if you're passing through. They have a selection of produce from a variety of Borough Market traders. Cheeses from the likes of Neal's Yard, charcuterie from Cannon & Cannon and others (I had some venison salami from there yesterday evening) and a small but good selection of booze. And, on weekdays, http://www.kerbfood.com/kings-cross/ is a short walk away, offering a choice of top-notch street food.

 

When I first started commuting through the Kings Cross/St Pancras area, you'd be more likely to go home with a stab wound than a bottle of Chateau Musar.

post #581 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post
 


When I first started commuting through the Kings Cross/St Pancras area, you'd be more likely to go home with a stab wound than a bottle of Chateau Musar.

and possibly a lady who charges by the minute...

post #582 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by dc-k View Post
 

and possibly a lady who charges by the minute...


I was offered "business?" by a young lady at 8:30 in the morning once, just outside Kings Cross.

post #583 of 585
Quote:
Originally Posted by PalJoey View Post


I was offered "business?" by a young lady at 8:30 in the morning once, just outside Kings Cross.
that's why I have good sound isolation... ;-)
post #584 of 585

FourBarrel coffee

+

American Weigh Scales Black Blade Digital Pocket Scale

+

Baratza Encore grinder

+

Bodum French Press (8cp) 

=


Edited by rekondita - 10/18/14 at 7:09pm
post #585 of 585

I have a plethora of coffee things, from $20 coffee makers, to my espresso machine, my collection of stove top makers, about 5 different grinders neat little storage solutions. Coffee is my other hobby, heh

 

I think my most used is my little Aeropress I see some people talking about here. Its fantastic, dead easy to clean and use, and the coffee it makes isn't bad. My one compliant is paper filters. If you have a nice grind, non-paper filters are better. They keep more of the flavorful oils in the cup (which is why actual french press coffee is so oily and how presses get more flavor and richer cup sometimes)

 

you can by some nice metal filters for it, but cost something like $35 for a small metal disk with holes. Its more expensive then the Aeropress 

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